Scott Meshey 141

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About Scott Meshey 141

  • Rank
    TT Newbie

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Florida
  • Interests
    I'm a Motocross racer for life! It's been my passion ever since I was a little kid. I strive for excellence in all aspects in my life, whether it is racing, college, or my personal being. I also enjoy good food with great people, paddle boarding (and the beach in general), and physics. As an elite athlete, physical training is just another part of my life, however I do enjoy a good workout session and being physically fit. I also enjoy writing about my experiences as a racer, and being able to share what I have learned from my experiences with others, whether it's simply for reading pleasure or if it helps give someone a realistic look at what Motocross is for a grass-roots racer.

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  1. TP199 was a real MVP for staying a people's hero and interacting with the fans as much as he did. It seems like there are very few who can see racing as more than just a "show" anymore. It's nice to see that some pros, guys who are idols to the up-and-comings, staying humble enough to not be above interacting with all fans, remembering they were once the kids lining up just to even be in the presence of their heroes. I know when I have people, no matter their age, coming up to me to talk, I take my time to have a good conversation. When kids come talk to me, I take the time and give them my full attention, because I remember what it was like to be that age and to look up to someone. When I first started riding, I looked up a local A guy named Casey Clark. I actually decided to use his number, 141, for myself... and I still continue to run it today. The reason the top guys get paid is because of the locals. Kudos to Deven. I know the feeling of being just outside of the unpopable bubble, trying to break in.
  2. Hello ThumperTalk readers! Welcome to the second entry of my blog series, following my journey exiting the amateur ranks into pro status. For more information about the blog series, check out the first entry, The Beginning of the Journey. For now, I’ll be taking a dip into my approach to the Loretta Lynn’s qualification process and preparing myself for regionals and forward. In the past, I’ve had a bit of a “just wing it” approach to what I did as far as racing went. While it has garnered me some success, it does not yield what I am truly capable of. Before I was released by my doctor to come back to racing, my family and I made the decision that we would change things up a bit. Of course, changes in plans isn’t uncharacteristic in a sport where there isn’t a whole lot that is certain. Like any racer, sometimes we have to switch up our lines in order to achieve the same goal. Wildwood MX, Picture by Bobby Bammann My approach is this… be as prepared as possible and do not rush the processes that take time. It wouldn’t be very wise to rush into the first regional event with semi-adequate preparation, not only in the sense of myself, but also my bike. Instead, I am giving myself plenty of time to continue riding, becoming faster on the bike and becoming stronger physically and mentally through gate drops and training with great people who know the process and know what it takes to reach where I want to go. Every time I am on the bike, I strive to learn something new about myself, the bike, push myself to try new things, and if I am unsure about something, be open to the advice given. With that being said, big thanks to those in my company that are making my journey to make myself great more possible than ever; Ricky Renner, RJ Hampshire, and DJ MacFarlane. I personally believe that the best form of training is to race. If you fall in a moto during training, you can rush to get up and get back going again to simulate a race. However, the environment of actually being in a race where everything you do has a real consequence can create a very different mindset. Gate drops are key in order to have your important race days on lock *insert key-and-lock emoji here*. Obviously, having A class payback is always a nice incentive to go racing… getting some gate drops in and make a couple bucks in the process. On the other hand, experience, and of course fun, is what it’s all about. If you can’t keep it fun, then it’s not worth pursuing. Dade City MX, Picture by Erwin Ziegler I’ve never lived at a training facility, so my efforts have required a different level of mental toughness where no one is forcing my hand at being “mentally tough”. My efforts are self-imposed and they require the want and drive in myself to achieve success. Most of my competitors at the top level of amateur racing have spent months and years at training facilities with the constant intensity of daily and hourly practice and training sessions, being pushed beyond what I have ever experienced, other than my few weeks here-and-there training with professionals. After a year off, my hunger and desire to get back and surpass my previous standing in the racing community pushes me to aggressively attack my riding and training time with a new level of determination and maturity to quickly reconcile mistakes, figure out why I goofed it, make necessary adjustments, and find the best course of action for me to be the best I can be. Lazy River MX Loretta Lynn's Area Qualifier, still shot from a video taken by Ricky Renner By this time next month, regionals will be finishing up and it’ll be time to prepare for the big show. Check in for content along the way and come along for the ride, tap/click the "Follow" button! I’ll see you at the races. Scott Meshey #141
  3. 2018 honda

    Glad to see that they went to an electric start, such a lifesaver! If only they would do some much needed updates on the 250...
  4. I would keep the 80. He will only get bigger and he will become more comfortable with a bike he knows and learn to use the power more and more.
  5. Unfortunately with Vurbmoto's shutdown, none of the content that I had posted will display. Thanks for the interest! I'm excited to share the journey.
  6. I’M BACK! Hello ThumperTalk readers! My name is Scott Meshey. If you’re from the Motocross community there is a good chance you might know me through my blog series from Vurbmoto “Life with the Mesheys”, if not, please check my profile. Get to know me, and I hope you follow along with this blog series. For this entry, I’ll dish out some background and where I am headed right now, kicking off the start of the series. So let’s get to it! My blog series for Vurbmoto ran for 3 and a half years until their recent shutdown. The opportunity to share my experiences through Vurb and now on ThumperTalk is something I truly enjoy. This blog series will follow my progression, good, bad, and everything in between to the pro ranks, sharing my experiences and wisdom I gain along the way. Whether you ride the trails on the weekends, hit the back roads after work, are a serious racer, or a parent of a racer, I hope my experiences give insight not only to just Motocross racing, but I hope they give a unique perspective of the challenges behind the goggles. I want readers to enjoy reading my experiences, but I also want others that aspire to achieve the same goals as myself, particularly the youngsters of the sport, to learn from these blogs in their quest to be the best. I’ve been riding since I was 4. I started competing at amateur Motocross nationals when I was about 9 or 10 years old, contending at the Loretta Lynn’s Amateur Motocross National 9 years in a row, the Winter National Olympics or “Mini O’s”, the RCSX at Daytona, the Lake Whitney Spring Championship, the Mill Creek Spring Classic, and the JS7 Freestone National Championship. I’ve ridden for several amateur teams, and had the privilege of working with some legends of the sport. In 2016, I jumped into the pro Arenacross series for a few rounds to get experience in the pro ranks. Unfortunately, my experience was cut short by unresolved health problems from a bad case of pneumonia in 2015. Loretta Lynn’s 2015, Picture by Sarah Behrens Photography This brings me to where I am today. After hitting the reset button and off the bike for a year, I’m back home in the motocross scene, eager to continue sharing my story and experiences with the dirt biking world, back to good health with amazing people behind me. I’ll be going to Loretta’s for my 10th year in the 250A and Open Pro Sport classes, and jumping into the pro Motocross series thereafter. Come along for the ride and tap/click the follow button! I’ll see you at the races. Scott Meshey #141