NumberCruncher

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About NumberCruncher

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    Washington
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    Dirt Bikes and Photography
  1. I suspect the EFI module picks up on one side and not the other. If it were just gravity, have a tap on both sides with a Y fitting to the carb. Durned EFI bikes . . . NC
  2. Curious if it is EFI related. NC
  3. Tied going into the final three races? Winner takes it all. Whomever wins the title will deserve it. NC
  4. Wimp! I received an email notification with your lame reply and you are too chicken shit to keep it here. Losers like you tempt me to get myself banned so I don't waste time here. I'll just buy a TM or Sherco. Those won't need any prep. NC Curious to see if any of the stupid people here quote me without getting this far. I will always maintain that a bike should be assembled properly by the factory and prepped by my local dealer. After that it is up to me, regardless of brand. Five bikes in my garage, which one will be my sixth . . .
  5. To make your post worthwhile, can you at least look at my point number one, added here below, and tell me what is wrong with it? The answer, of course, is nothing. 1) Properly assembled at the factory. THERE IS NO REASON A PERSON SHOULD HAVE TO CHECK ANY NUTS AND BOLTS FOR PROPER TORQUING! If the factory does their job properly, this would prove that nothing needed adjustment and all that effort was wasted. Do you check every fitting on your computer when you buy a new one? Do you make sure the speaker drivers in your new HT setup are properly seated? No. Why. Because you have a reasonable expectation that the factory should do their job properly. Anyone who argues this is a fool! The manufacturer is responsible for putting the bike together properly, not the buyer. If the manufactures have determined that a dirt bike should not have to be assembled with grease/oil/proper torquing then our industry is in a downward death spiral. You are just enabling manufacturers to get away with shoddy construction. I don't do that. But then if you ever worked for me I'd probably have to fire your lazy pot smoking ass for your poor performance. Fortunately I am retired and don't have to deal with your mentality in the workplace. It is sad a person like you actually rides a Beta. I bought a brand two years ago and did not immediately pull the roof off. Or the siding. I didn't re-strecth the carpet. I didn't repave the garage. I do have to mow the lawn however . . . I'll let you know anytime I have something for sale. I'd love to sell it to a sucker like you. NC
  6. Deleted. NC
  7. Your last point is dead on the money. I always laugh at how the more money people spend, the more they tolerate and expect problems. "Just spent $275k on that new Ferrari. How do I like it? Well, you know, its a high strung tempermental race car and I blew the engine the second time I drove it. It'll be down a month. Warranty won't cover anything but I am cool with that. But check this out, you know that god damned Honda Civic I bought? That piece of Japanese crap needs the oil changed every 5,000 miles. I can't believe it! I spent good money on that car." NC
  8. Comments are directed at people who think we should buy a new bike and immediately tear it down to prep it for intended use. New to this game but I don't inspect a brand new car for half the crap some of you guys are calling out. If you are just going to ride recreationally, you shouldn't have to check each coolant line. Yeah it is a good idea but where do you draw the line? Should I re-torque the head as well? It seems like some people expect a bike to have zero maintenance, zero oil consumption, zero fuel consumption and come with the winning lottery numbers. Others it seems expect to pay $500 for assembly and have to disassemble the entire bike yourself. There should be a happy medium. Having said that, any new bike should be: 1) Properly assembled at the factory. THERE IS NO REASON A PERSON SHOULD HAVE TO CHECK ANY NUTS AND BOLTS FOR PROPER TORQUING! If the factory does their job properly, this would prove that nothing needed adjustment and all that effort was wasted. Do you check every fitting on your computer when you buy a new one? Do you make sure the speaker drivers in your new HT setup are properly seated? No. Why. Because you have a reasonable expectation that the factory should do their job properly. Anyone who argues this is a fool! The manufacturer is responsible for putting the bike together properly, not the buyer. If the manufactures have determined that a dirt bike should not have to be assembled with grease/oil/proper torquing then our industry is in a downward death spiral. 2) The dealer should do a reasonable PDI to make sure nothing broke in shipping the bike. The dealer shouldn't have to re-torque the cylinder head any more than the buyer should. This additional set of eyes should make the bike ready to ride, right off the showroom floor. I shouldn't have to check the oil or radiator level. It may be a good idea but I shouldn't have to. 3) If "most bikes" are not raced through the most brutal conditions, then a dealer does not need to prep the bike for such extreme conditions. If any one hard core racer knows he will need to grease a particular bearing every ten hours of use then fine, go ahead and do that TEN hours after you first pick the bike up. Why would the factory not properly grease a fitting that requires grease? See point #1 above. 4) If there is something the manufacturer cannot do, like ship the bike with oil in the crankcase, that needs to be communicated to the importer and then to the dealer. If there is something that the dealer cannot do, (and I am making this up) like change ignition timing after break in, then this should be communicated to the rider at the time the bike is picked up if not prior to buying the bike itself. 5) Once the bike is in the hands of the buyer it should be ready to go. How the rider uses the bike will determine the frequency and scope of maintenance. 6) These points simply make sense as the manufacturer has a vested interest in building the bike properly and communicating this to the importer of a given country. The importer then knows what to tell the dealers and the dealer knows what to tell the buyer. But nobody should have to do the other persons job for him. 7) I get that our lives are on the line with a motorcycle more than just about any consumer product. But what may be prudent to do and what has to be done are do different things. If you were a manufacturer would you believe in a simple process of we build it properly and will tell the importer what they should do and they can pass that to the dealer and then to the buyer? How can it be anything other than this? Would you ever work at a company where before you did your job you had to re-do the person's job before you? NC
  9. The only way I ever got a 450 to NOT overheat was to switch to a 250 and sometimes add a big bore kit. I think all the 450s run real hot. The MXers are the worst for sure but most foe the enduros run warm as well. I think if you have a fan you should be okay and I would add a coolant recovery bottle as well. That should take care of most of the issues. To the extent one can stay off the clutch is a big help but we all know there are times when that is necessary. Then again I have known people who always ride the clutch even in first gear. Some of them are just geared way too tall and if you are riding a bike like that in tight woods, you will certainly overheat. Sorry I can't give better advice but as you know from experience, two strokes almost never run hot. I think a richer EFI map will help any four stroke but then you have the hassle of doing that as well. I would visually inspect the size of the radiator on any bike you want to buy. Some are quite a bit bigger than others and a larger reservoir of coolant can only help. NC
  10. Glad to hear it is a "good" wait as you are building it up. Cool. NC
  11. Down waiting on parts? What part and for low long? I thought the "parts issues" for non-Japanese bikes was long gone? NC
  12. Glad you mentioned the low seat height. Oh to be able to reach flat footed on ANY new dirt bike . . . that is a dream! Have you sat on a Sherco four stroke? There is a reason they have as much ground clearance as any 250cc two stroke mer. Sky high seat. Not to mention how quiet a KDX 200 was and how well they worked for tight woods with only a jetting change. NC
  13. The KDX was such an awesome bike for only $4,000. That segment of the market is totally neglected now. If Kawasaki brought that bike back at say $4,500 they'd sell a ton of them. Don't know what we got until it is taken away. I still hope to come across a barn find where some dude bought a cabin in the mountains along with two KDX200's that sat unused for the past ten years and I can pick them up for dirt cheap. Yeah I know this is probably not going to happen but I bet there are at least a few new KDX's either in the crate or sitting under a tarp in the shed. NC
  14. It kinda makes sense, however frustrating that may be. Say a guy gets a reputation for doing great suspension work and gets too busy so he hires a couple kids. Gives them a diagram of what to do based on what you want but they either don't care or don't know enough and you get an assembly line job so to speak. I can see why so many fork guys will redo them for free. It takes time and money to keep sending them back and most people won't do that. NC
  15. I had Les do the Marzocchis on all my late model Husky's and if I need any suspension work, Les is my go to. Great guy and great service. Everyone in the PNW uses him. He is likely getting a bit backlogged right now so give him a ring and see if he can squeeze you in. Highly recommended. NC