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coop63

Easiest way to install crank bearings!

7 posts in this topic

The crankcase can safely be heated to as much as 275 ℉ with an accurately controlled heat source, and 25 minutes is usually adequate. Dry ice is not strictly necessary, but it is colder, of course. 40 minutes in a normal food freezer should do the job.

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I've heard of doing this before, even with quad swinger carrier bearings. Never seen a video of it though. Pretty cool

Rob

Edited by 02YZ85

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The crankcase can safely be heated to as much as 275 ℉ with an accurately controlled heat source, and 25 minutes is usually adequate. Dry ice is not strictly necessary, but it is colder, of course. 40 minutes in a normal food freezer should do the job.

Of note, I changed to dry ice some time back.. as it works faster, and there is less chance of moisture coating the bearing then if you place in the freezer. (though if you let it warm up in a humid area, you will still get condensation .. so protect those bearings with a water resistant lube BEFORE freezing them, then lube directly after install to drive out moisture.

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Any of you who have ever worked with an automotive drive axle will appreciate this: Last week end my son and I did a ring and pinion in his Jeep in my driveway. The rear pinion bearing is normally a tight press fit, but we ran it up to 350 on the top rack of my gas grill and dropped it straight onto the pinion shaft when we pulled it out of the fridge. Just dropped it.

One thing worth noting about this technique. Steel doesn't expand or shrink very much with temp changes, so what often happens is that the steel part, in the case of the bearings in the crankcase, can easily pick up enough heat from the case to "stick" part way in, especially if you don't get it exactly squared up when inserting. If that happens, be ready to work around the outer race with an appropriate tool to drive it in the rest of the way. It will still be much easier to drive the bearing down to its seat than if you were working both parts at room temperature.

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few times I did the heat cool method I had mixed results,sometimes they just fell in and other time you had to tap it in part ways.I'm betting that when I had to tap it was still easier than if I didn't heat/cool everything.I just used the good ole freezer and a heat gun for the case.

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few times I did the heat cool method I had mixed results,sometimes they just fell in and other time you had to tap it in part ways.I'm betting that when I had to tap it was still easier than if I didn't heat/cool everything.I just used the good ole freezer and a heat gun for the case.

Try a oven to evenly and completely heat the case or item with the Bore. The heat gun likely did not do what you needed.

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