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jackbombay

Looking at a 2007 yz450 on Saturday

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I'm new to "real dirt bikes" but I've done a fair bit of reading here and it seems llike the 2007 is pretty solid, this one is particular is reported to be very low hours, still on its original tires, original owner, the bike looks super clean in the pics.

Anything I should pay particular attention to when checking it out?

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Well one thing you want to do is make sure it does have low hours. Look at wear on the pegs, the kick starter, the rear brakes, the headset, the chain guide and pad. These should be dead giveaways if the bike is used heavily or not. Anyone can take the plastic / tires off when they get it and put it back on when they sell it ;).

Make sure it starts easy. If it doesn't could need some valve adjustments.

Make sure the exhaust color is blacker than grayer. You want it running rich rather than lean. Just look at the exhaust carbon build up.

Make sure it shifts smoothly.

Other than that, everything else can easily be repaired imo.

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Well one thing you want to do is make sure it does have low hours. Look at wear on the pegs, the kick starter, the rear brakes, the headset, the chain guide and pad. These should be dead giveaways if the bike is used heavily or not.

I was certainly planning on looking at all those parts closely, in the pics the frame next to the pegs looks like it has very little boot wear on it.

As far as checking the headset I assume you put the bike on a stand and check that theadset turns freely/smoothly?

Abotu how thick are the rear brake pads when new?

Make sure it starts easy. If it doesn't could need some valve adjustments.

I'll ask him to leave the bike cold.

Make sure the exhaust color is blacker than grayer. You want it running rich rather than lean. Just look at the exhaust carbon build up.

Thats one I woulnd't have though of!

Thanks for the info :-)

Edited by jackbombay

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Pads should be 3-4mm, depending on how low the hours are. Yes on the headset.

The boot wear will come off easily the first time you wash it and using some scotchbrite on it :thumbsup:

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check under the chain wear bar on the swingarm up by the engine,its known to wear through the swingarm over time.Also make sure the shocks aren't leaking and the linkage bearings aren't loose.

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The steering head bearings will be dry and need to be inspected if the past owner has not updated them to the newer ones with the better seals. I have the same bike, you'll love it.... Stan

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The bike just about came out of a time machine from the year 2008, everything was in extremely good condition and had very little wear, asking price was $2700...

But after a lot of thinking and talking with friends who have ridden around here for years on all sorts of different bikes I don't think it is the right bike for me, I'll be mostly trail riding and our trails are pretty technical so the bike would need a fair bit of work to really be suited to what I'd be using it for.

The 2 guys I know who ride the most around here both say they would never ride in the big holes without a happy button one of them noted that you'll only ever stall the bike in places that are typically the last place you would want to kick start it. I was looking at a rekluse to deal with that and a bigger sprocket for the back, but the power delivery on these YZ's is already quite the punch to the face so gearing down would only make that more pronounced. The suspension would also ideally be softened as well.

I know there are plenty of guys that love their YZs on trails, and for someone that has a fair bit of experience on big dirt bikes I'm sure this bike is a blast.

I'm torn, it seems like a WR really matches my needs, but a lot of guys talk about them as if its a bike for grandma to go to the store to get some denture cleaner. There are a couple KTM 450/525 exc's for sale around me in my price range so I'm going to take a look at those. The WRs for sale around here are a few hundred bucks more than the YZs for sure, and there are certainly fewer of them to choose from, there aren't many KTMs either though.

Winter is certainly here to stay for a while, but I was hoping to pick up a bike for a good price this fall, if nothing comes along waiting till spring isn't the end of the world.

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I also have an 07 450 that I have ridden in the mountains as well as the desert here in southern Idaho. I have stock gearing on it and its fine for me. A friend has an 09 WR450 and we have switched bikes many times. After riding my bike he felt he made mistake buying the WR. The E start is great but the biggest issue is the weight. Its feels like a huge difference (which it is). The power delivery is non issue as my YZF is pretty managable. The tall first gear takes some additional clutch work but for me its not been too much of an issue. I think when i replace the chain and sprockets I will go up one tooth in the back to gear it down a little bit. The other major difference between a WR and YZ is the suspension. The YZ gets the SSS forks and upgraded shock. The WR has neither and its very noticable riding them back to back. Even thought the YZF is an MX bike the suspension is pretty plush while the WR is mushy at higher speeds.

Your comments on a KTM point to one of those maybe splitting the difference. You get the E start but less weight and more performance than a WR in a bike that is more suited to the woods than a YZ is. If I could afford it I would use my YZF for the desert and pick up a KTM 2 stroke (300 EXC) for the woods.

As you have probably already seen, here in Idaho KTMs command a premium price.

Good luck with your search.

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The power delivery is non issue as my YZF is pretty managable. The tall first gear takes some additional clutch work but for me its not been too much of an issue.

There are several guys around here that ride YZ450s in the woods, but all of them have told me of times that the bike did a back flip out from under them when climbing steep single track, presumably because of a combination of hooking up and peaky power delivery (compared to a Wr or KTM EXC) of the YZ. That makes me a little nervous.

I've been on and off motorcycles since I was 15 (38 now), so I'm not a total noob, but the YZ does seem like going from knee deep to neck deep.

Your comments on a KTM point to one of those maybe splitting the difference. You get the E start but less weight and more performance than a WR in a bike that is more suited to the woods than a YZ is. If I could afford it I would use my YZF for the desert and pick up a KTM 2 stroke (300 EXC) for the woods.

The 450/525 KTMs actually weight 4 pounds more than the same year WR, although reviews on the KTMs are generally quite good where the WR reviews are, well, your experience riding the YZ and WR back to back is telling.

There are some KTM 300 2 strokes around right now, no estart, but kick starting a 2 stroke is easier than the large displacement high comp 4 strokes. The KTM 300 is 36 pounds lighter than a KTM 450, with the green spring for the powervalve the KTM 300 sounds half way friendly, and a wide ratio trans which is one of my big hesitations about the YZ, and the 300 would have enough power for the times I head to the sand, it is also the lightest bike I have looked up specs on.

As you have probably already seen, here in Idaho KTMs command a premium price.

They're right about the same as the WRs ironically enough, except for the 300 2 strokes that is, but those aren't too bad, but right at the top of my budget...

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Listen to the man who has both and was just riding them friday on some tight trails. My friend and i were trading off and because the yz has a rekluse exp2.0 it was deemed the best trail bike. The power on a yz450is far from peaky and could not be smoother. It does however have enough power to hurt the stupid. Crappy weak starters on all trail bikes. Not worth the extra weight. The yz never stalls even when i fell over in a rut. Didn't have to pull in the clutch when i picked the bike up.

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