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Spring Adjustment

9 posts in this topic

Rear spring adjustment? Is there a better way than sticking a screwdriver between the reservoir and the frame? I don't want to use a hammmer and screwdriver to turn the locking rings on the top of the spring. Please tell me, I need to stiffen up the rear end.

Dennis

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That's how the pros do it only they use a good punch that won't slip and mess up the nut. You generally only need to bang on the top (locking) nut. Once that's loose you can normally just grab the spring and twist it and the nut will turn to. Unless you're unlucky and it's stubborn like mine. Everyone else I know can just turn the spring. Just becarefull where you place the punch so that it doesn't slip off and round the nut tabs.

Khris

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When in doubt, GAS IT!

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I took the subframe off and used large channell locks.

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Pretend it's flat and give it the gas.

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Den, I agree with Khris' suggestion to use a long punch, and turn the entire spring by hand. I remove my mudflap to get a good grip on the spring. Also, it's easier if you have the bike on a work stand with the back wheel off the ground.

RAZOR

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Well, I took the advise and used a punch. I hope I have the 3 to 3.5 inches that the manual calls for. Thr only problem I had was touching the ground. Before I had no problem with the spring so mushy. A little adjustment on the dampining and looks like I'm about ready. Thanks Guys!!! :)

Dennis

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One more thing to add to this, I hope this doesn't scare you!! A friend used this method and it worked great but he didn't get the lock nut tight enough when finished and it worked it's way loose. When this happened the actual thread surface supporting the spring was essentially cut in half and the result was that the shock actually forced the single nut upwards and destroyed the threads on the shock body. Basically the lesson is to make sure that lock nut is tight!! But don't strip it!

Khris

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When in doubt, GAS IT!

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How tight is tight? I gave it a couple of wacks when I thought it was seated. I'm going back out there and check it.

Thanks,

Dennis

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That's hard to say, I know the first time someone did it for me I was surprised how much he pounded that lock nut tight. Then he told me the story and I understand why. I would go until it's tight, I know that doesn't help does it! When I do it I give it five or six good hits once it's snug, you know to really tighten it up. It'll get to a point where you should tell it won't go anymore. Another reason it's hard to judge is cause the shock moves when you hit it. I know that I eyeball it occasionally for the first couple of rides just to make sure. Sorry I can't really give you a torque measurement for the amount of hitting power I use. Maybe someone else can help describe it.

Khris

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When in doubt, GAS IT!

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Take a black marker and mark both of the nuts. If they move from the original mark after tightning, you need to get it tighter. I also used the "twist the spring" technique. Marked the spring and counted revolutions.

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It's your world, I just play in it!

'00WR, WB E-Series S-Bend w/7 discs, Stock header, throttle stop trimmed, airbox cover removed. Stock jetting. 4500ft.

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