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Ryel

New inner Tube

13 posts in this topic

Searching the TT store I find the following information:

Bridgestone Heavy Duty Tube Size - 80/100-21 Valve Stem Type TR-4 $38.94

Bridgestone Ultra Heavy Duty Tube Size 80/100-21 $34.40

Michelin Airstop tubes are used by those who want the very best $28.45

Maxxis Heavy-Duty Tube 90/100-21 - TR4 $18.95

MSR Heavy-Duty Tube - 80/100-21 - TR-6 Valve Stem PRICE: $20.85

MSR Ultra Heavy-Duty Tube - 80/100-21 - TR-6 Valve Stem 1.75mm thick $43.65

Kenda Heavy Duty Tube - 80/100-21 - TR-6 2.5mm heavy-duty butyl rubber $27.50

Kenda looks like the best buy with it's 2.5mm rubber but what makes the MSR worth $43.65, or the Bridgestone at $38.94?

What do I need to understand to make the best purchase of a new tube?

and where do I find that information?

ps

what is the difference between Valve Stem Type TR-4 and TR-6?

Edited by Ryel

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Tr4_Rubber_Base_Tube_Tyre_Valve_For_Motorcycle_Scooter.jpg

I would find out how thick the Maxxis tube is, then make a decision.

Remember the 90/100-21 tube will stretch a little bit less in your tire than the 80.

If your tube is stretched out, it will much more easily puncture, versus one that mates with the tire nicely.

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For off road I've always heard and been told moose heavy duty or Bridgestone ultra heavy duty. I've always run moose hd tubes and never had issues. The street riders say that the thick tubes hurt performance on pavement due to increased unsprung weight though.

One thing to note is that any of the natural rubber tubes will leak down some psii daily. I can air my moose tubes up to 18psi and two days later they are 15 psi...natural rubber wears better but does leak down some over time. Just make your or ride check for tire pressure mandatory as well as having a way to inflate them a couple psi trail side on a multi day ride (co2 works great for this imho)

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WOW! 4mm thickness and they don't use the TR6 stem? still a great deal.

I know nothing about the stems, what makes the TR6 stem better for a 4mm thick tube?

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Look at the post above, wider base for less ripout.

Okay, I saw that. That's a plus no matter the tube thickness, though. Since you specifically stated 4mm tube I thought I was missing something with regards to how one stem design is better for a particular tube thickness.

If you rip a stem its not usually the tubes fault. Most of the time I've seen that happen its been user error.

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I came into this thread with little knowledge and no pre-conceived choices.

Now I know the difference between TR-4 and TR-6 stem

I know that each tube has different thickness

I learned that some are natural rubber and some are Butyl-rubber

I learned that natural rubber needs to be checked and filled regularly

I learned that natural rubber claims to be more resilient to puncture, not confirmed.

ps

I learned that price has nothing to do with quality

Edited by Ryel
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I have been really impressed with the Kenda Tuff tube, TT sells it, I think it was like $12 for a front. I have also heard that HD Bridgestone that is 4mm is super strong. My experience has been that the stem is always the weak point so that TR-6 stem looks like a good choice as well.

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Speaking from experience the HD tubes are a pain in the butt to change on the fly. Because they are heavier they are stiffer and are hard to get into the tire, hard to fish the valve stem through the rim and harder to pack into a fender bag. If you ride dirt stick with standard tubes (unless you are riding the desert). Just my two cents.

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Speaking from experience the HD tubes are a pain in the butt to change on the fly. Because they are heavier they are stiffer and are hard to get into the tire, hard to fish the valve stem through the rim and harder to pack into a fender bag. If you ride dirt stick with standard tubes (unless you are riding the desert). Just my two cents.

I run heavy duty and ultra heavy duty tubes in the tires but carry standard duty tubes for spares.

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