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TheDude1973

99 yz400f first trip to the shop. Few questions

9 posts in this topic

Interesting that today I'd be posting the first time on here. The bike got its inaugural endo-ver end on top of me today too. It's like its official, I'm back into riding.

My experince trail riding has been 100% at rampart range in Colorado. Fun stuff to ride in especially if it's not too dry. I started riding when I was about 10 and rode until I was 18 or so. I'm 39 now, and it seems lie the dirt bike world has changed more than I can understand without professional help. So I'm taking it to my cousin who has a bike shop down in town (Denver).

So based on everything I've read digging through the forum, here's what I plan on asking.

1. Is the bike worth putting some money into and keeping for a few or more years as a trail bike?

2. Fork seals and suspension; both front and rear. If they're still factory original, do we need to do a complete tear down, or just basic seal maintenance?

3. I'm going to ask about installing hot cams , and getting rid of the manual decomp for the rest of eternity.

4. Exhaust I believe is stock? I'm going to stick with it, unless there's a better option for tight trail riding.

5. Radiator and cooling issues. Just want to see if he has any ideas on keeping it cool on slow tractor paced tight tought trails.

6. Have him look at the carb, and if it's the stock carb from 1999, see if he can locate (or install after I've located) a newer 450f carb.

7. Its geared at 13/50 currently. That doesn't slow me to what I'd consider tractor mode. I'm thinking of 13/52 for a solution.

8. There's some cable damage, and I'm going to have him replace that.

I'm a bit old for ripping through trails anymore. That period passed me by. But I still love the hell out of some day long ride that keeps my 100% focus and attention the whole time. So I just want to do older rider slow steady riding, but still tackle the challanging trails. Is there anything I've forgotten and should consider?

Thanks, this board is pretty sweet!

Dude

Edited by TheDude1973

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I have a 2000 426 I going to send my rear shock out to have new oil and might as well have the it revalved as long as it in there I going to get the forks revavled also yes it cost about $500.00 but cheeper than buying a new bike.

I put the hot cam in mine worth every penny for the easy of starting I keeped the stock decompreson lever also just me I pull the lever in when I first going to start it kick though about 5 times to clear it put on TDC and fires up first kick every time after I get running I dont use it the rest of the days riding.

For the carb just do the mods posted on the sticky board and you should be fine save your self some money.

I put a front master cylinder off a Honda CRF and ran a front Brake hose from a CRF also so the bike will stop much better.

So good luck have fun riding I am 50 years old now I stopped riding 4 years ago and got the ich like you said I not out to break speed records just to go out now and then and have some fun.

Yes we getting old but not dead yet might well do what we love to do is ride one of these day you willnt beable to any more thats when we stop LOL.

Edited by marv02

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1. The bike's worth not much more than $1200 tops these days. You decide.

2. If they're original, the fluid needs changing. Most competent mechanics can change the fork seals easily enough if they leave the dampers in the fork. KYB shock seals are a piece of cake, but it does require breaking down one end of the shock shaft or the other, and working on a shock should only be attempted by a really competent mechanic who at least has a good set of written instructions to work with, if not training or experience. Not tough, but picky work.

3. Do it. There are no disadvantages.

5. 400's are tough that way. The YZ has small radiators compared to either the WR or the YZ426, and any of these that you can find for sale will bolt on (might have to make up a shroud bracket). Battery operated fans are the ultimate cure for the problem, though.

6. If the beast runs acceptably with the OEM carb, save your money and run it. If not, don't spend too much time and money trying make a silk purse out of it. A carb from an '05 or later YZ450 is a virtual bolt-on, and the overall performance improvement is well worth it. If you go that way, you'll need throttle cables and the complete hot start cable, etc., so try to get one that comes with as much stuff as possible.

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Thank you both. I'm probably going to throw her on CL, and get into a smaller bike. I weigh about 170, and I can't seem to manhandle the bike in a way that makes me feel totally in control. Something in an air cooled four stroke in the 250cc displacement size range.

It's high riding season on the trails here in Colorado, so I know I can get $1200 for it. Maybe put another thousand on top of what I get for my bike towards something a little newer.

I really appreciate the responses. Truth is, I think for my riding style, and the 20 year break I took from the hobby, this is just too much bike for me.

Dude

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Im not 100 percent sure but I think anything in the air cooled type of bike will be heavier than what you have???

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Im not 100 percent sure but I think anything in the air cooled type of bike will be heavier than what you have???

Maybe so. I just assumed since the radiator and water weight are gone, and it's the same displacement, it would weigh less

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Maybe so. I just assumed since the radiator and water weight are gone, and it's the same displacement, it would weigh less

The YZ400 is a bit on the heavy side at around 260 wet, but mostly it's big (later YZF's are lighter). For comparison, a TTR230 is just over 250 wet, but it has a 5 inch lower seat height. A CRF230 is about the same.

The radiators, coolant, and everything associated with the cooling system is only about 6-7 pounds. The difference is the more expensive materials used to build the YZ/WR line and keep it that light compared with the TTR's and XR's.

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