HEADS UP!!!

Site upgrade in progress... Core site functions are working, but some non-critical features/functions will be temporarily unavailable while we work to restore them over the next couple of weeks.

Please post any bugs you encounter, but before you do, check to see if it's already listed.

Thanks for your patience while we work to improve the community.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Bigoldbeef

Why can't yamaha import a bike like this to the USA?!

67 posts in this topic

There was also a 98 2stroke wr250 that was brought into Canada and Aus, not street legal here but was in Japan and Aus i think, great bike, looked like a YZ but 18 rear wheel , kick stand mount and a "lighting coil". Was my favourite bike, never used first or 5th in the trails and would do 150kph or 90mph in fifth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we don't get them in the US because our clueless dealers go to the convention every year in vegas and tell yamaha they want more cruisers , mx and sportbikes. Because that's what they think sells.

Most the euro dealers are actually guys that ride, so know what to ask for.,

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roughly $50k for EPA and CARB certification. If Husky can do it on multiple bikes for as few as they sell then why can't Yamaha?

Without knowing that those figures are correct, assuming they are, then it seems like a real bargain and I'm at a loss as to why Yamaha wouldn't jump on the opportunity. There must be something here that we aren't factoring in with this discussion. I'm going to throw out a few thoughts.

On top of EPA and CARB, there is also the DOT. They regulate much of the design and construction of motor vehicles sold in the US. I don't have in depth experience dealing with DOT, but I have read a fair amount of the regulation concerning lighting and other electrical items on motors vehicles. One of the things I know is that to obtain the proper certifications to register the bikes on the street here will involve a lot of testing. A lot of testing of lights, fuel tanks, controls, and probably a few other things I don't even know about.

Again, the question can be asked " If Husky can do it on multiple bikes for as few as they sell then why can't Yamaha?". There might be something to do with the numbers of vehicles imported and waivers or specific exemptions if you import up to, let's say for arguments sake, 5000 bikes total. I don't have a big background on the Husky's, but if they were to get the DOT waivers then they would only need to deal with the EPA and CARB. $50000 over 5000 bikes is only $10 per bike. Maybe they can only get waivers/exemptions for the controls but the lights still need to meet DOT requirements. It might be just as easy for them to buy someone else's already certified lights. So why can't Yamaha use their WR250 lights? They're already certified. I don't have an answer for that one.

Roadworthiness regulations in the US are generally different than the rest of the world, I think we can all agree upon that. There isn't really much opportunity to import parts from other countries because they probably won't work here. I can't think of the last time I've seen EU and DOT markings on motorcycle parts. Japan may be a little different but I wouldn't bet the farm on that.

My point is that while I think we all agree that it would be nice to be able to buy the bike we already love and easily register it in the US. But I'm guessing they have enough bean counters at Yamaha to know what is profitable and what is not. Sure, KTM is selling a buttload of their bikes, but I guarantee they have a different business model than Yamaha. And in the long run, if KTM is eventually the only alternative, I'll buy Orange and deal with it. But until then I'm not going to drink the Kool-Aid and follow the lemmings over the cliff. I'll ride my Yamahas until I can't ride them anymore. And probably a little longer.

I'm going to count on the aftermarket to help get me through but their parts only go so far. When we really start dealing with EPA/CARB, we're going to be in trouble unless Yamaha steps up somehow and give us the street-legal WR we want.

trailhead

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because of politics. Specifically regulations implemented by the so-called Environmental "Protection" Agency. Look at all the hoops they had to jump through just to make the WR250R legal in the US - not to mention all the additional crap required by Californiastan. And it's only going to get worse...

im pretty sure all the a bomb tests the us did back in the 40's? polluted the earth more then us few on bikes do in our entire lifetime

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OUR STUPID CONTROLLING GOVERNMENT IS THE REASON WE CANT HAVE FUN ANYMORE!!! I REMEMBER A DAY WHEN THERE WAS MUCH MORE FREEDOM HERE BUT NOT NO MORE SINCE THE WAR ON FREEDOM HAS BEEN RATCHETED UP IN THE LAST 25 YEARS...aghhhhhhh!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woah woah woah, lets get it together hahaha

Plenty of bikes are being produced to conform to regulation, none of us want to step on eachothers toes. We are a rare breed of riders and what I think the original poster was trying to say is, can't we all agree that riding that bike legally in the street would be rad? I don't think he was asking for a real legit answer haha more of a rhetorical "why"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without knowing that those figures are correct, assuming they are

KTM said that's what it roughly cost them for each conforming model. As small as the market seems to be you'd have to sell a fair number of bikes to amortize that.

On top of EPA and CARB, there is also the DOT. They regulate much of the design and construction of motor vehicles sold in the US. I don't have in depth experience dealing with DOT, but I have read a fair amount of the regulation concerning lighting and other electrical items on motors vehicles. One of the things I know is that to obtain the proper certifications to register the bikes on the street here will involve a lot of testing. A lot of testing of lights, fuel tanks, controls, and probably a few other things I don't even know about.

Sadly virtually the entire world a couple of years back got together and unified emissions and safety standards on motor vehicles. Our politicians refused to even contemplate working with everybody else. Not only that we're not even unified in our own country with California hijacking reasonable policy.

Again, the question can be asked " If Husky can do it on multiple bikes for as few as they sell then why can't Yamaha? ". There might be something to do with the numbers of vehicles imported and waivers or specific exemptions if you import up to, let's say for arguments sake, 5000 bikes total. I don't have a big background on the Husky's, but if they were to get the DOT waivers then they would only need to deal with the EPA and CARB. $50000 over 5000 bikes is only $10 per bike. Maybe they can only get waivers/exemptions for the controls but the lights still need to meet DOT requirements. It might be just as easy for them to buy someone else's already certified lights. So why can't Yamaha use their WR250 lights? They're already certified. I don't have an answer for that one.

Waivers are no longer granted for on road vehicles. Customs will impound even single examples of vehicles now that are non conforming.

KTM is selling a buttload of their bikes, but I guarantee they have a different business model than Yamaha. And in the long run, if KTM is eventually the only alternative, I'll buy Orange and deal with it. But until then I'm not going to drink the Kool-Aid and follow the lemmings over the cliff. I'll ride my Yamahas until I can't ride them anymore. And probably a little longer.

Who in the world cares what color the bikes are? I own a 500exc, yz250, dr650, ec300, Montesa and Harley. Different tools, different jobs. The only lemming here seems to be you. ;)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0