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davidjay

Electrical short damage

6 posts in this topic

I new I had a short circuit on my 2003 wr 450. I had been disconnecting the battery after use. I recently left the battery connected for a week and as I expected the battery had 3vdc when I went to ride. I charged it over night, checked the battery voltage ( 12.5 vdc) and was surprised to find it still would not fire up. Could any electrical components be damaged by the short circuit? I was doing some test on the system, I believe the the cut off relay may be bad. There was some mistakes in the printing of the manual on how to test this relay. Could any one give me some pointers here on how to run this test. Answers to both of these questions would be helpfull.

Edited by davidjay

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You killed the battery, and now it will hold voltage, but not current.

Take off your plastics, tank, headlight, and find the short. It will just be a wire that has the insulation rubbed through.

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I new I had a short circuit on my 2003 wr 450. I had been disconnecting the battery after use. I recently left the battery connected for a week and as I expected the battery had 3vdc when I went to ride. I charged it over night, checked the battery voltage ( 12.5 vdc) and was surprised to find it still would not fire up. Could any electrical components be damaged by the short circuit? I was doing some test on the system, I believe the the cut off relay may be bad. There was some mistakes in the printing of the manual on how to test this relay. Could any one give me some pointers here on how to run this test. Answers to both of these questions would be helpfull.

David, Do you have an ohm meter? It is my favorite tool to use for finding a short in wiring systems, especially DC systems like you are having trouble with. Disconnect your battery connect the ohm meter to the battery leads. With the switch off, you should get a high resistance reading. Switch on will make the reading drop. If you have a low reading with switch off you can start disconnecting things one at a time until you find out where your short is.

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You killed the battery, and now it will hold voltage, but not current.

Take off your plastics, tank, headlight, and find the short. It will just be a wire that has the insulation rubbed through.

Can I confirm this with my meter set to dc amps? If the battery was functioning properly what would my current be? The fuse is a 10 amp fuse. Conversley, if the battery were not holding amps, what would the meter show, 0 amps?

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David, Do you have an ohm meter? It is my favorite tool to use for finding a short in wiring systems, especially DC systems like you are having trouble with. Disconnect your battery connect the ohm meter to the battery leads. With the switch off, you should get a high resistance reading. Switch on will make the reading drop. If you have a low reading with switch off you can start disconnecting things one at a time until you find out where your short is.

I do not have a switch on my bike. The electronic ignition is not in place. I have to kick the bike over to start. If I get what you are saying, I should show a very low resistance on my battery leads because I have a full 12+volt leak taking place. If I disconnect the part of the circuit that the short is in, my resistance reading should go up? would this hold true for shorts in the stator/ pulse generator? How about bad diodes or relays?

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David,

Answer is yes, it will hold true if the battery is being drained by a short as opposed to "not being charged" by a defective stator. You can use most modern ohm meters to check your diodes as well.

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