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cherrypicker7

Replacement Battery

3 posts in this topic

Been hearing a lot about the new Lithium Ion technology and was thinking about replacing worn out stock battery in my WR. Checked into a website that was discussing the pros and cons. First advantage is they are approximately 1/3 weight and size I would guess of what I'm now running. They can be recharged hundreds of times. Two things I found that are of a concern, actually three, they tend to be more expensive, some on occasion burst into fire, and the clincher they need to be replaced probably at least every three years. I don't know this for a fact, but I certainly don't want to have the bike catch on fire and burn down the garage or attached house. I don't like the idea of spending more money on something that needs to be replaced that frequently and with minimal upkeep the OEM stuff will last nearly as long. Weight isn't that big of an issue anyway. The exploding/catching on fire thing is a real biggy, have you been reading about the VOLT?

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Li Ion battery technology is so new (for powersports applications anyway), there is bound to be a lot of teething problems with it.

I, for one, am not fond of the thought of a battery blowing up between my knees.

I think I'll wait a few more years before buying one.

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There are several threads on this topic. One of the big reasons they blow up is due to overcharging. I believe the limit is around 16 volts for a 4 cell/8 cell pack, someone correct me if I'm wrong. Most regulator/rectifiers are limited to around 12.8-13.1 volts but there is some variance among manufactures. So you have to trust the charging system on your bike. One drawback is that if you leave the power on and drain your Li-ion battery, it can damage one of the cells and your battery is toast. I found out the hard way. A normal lead acid battery will take a deep discharge once or twice and not be affected as much. My battery is 1.5-2 years old and is going strong. You don't want one on a bike that doesn't have a kick start. When cold, they don't work well until they warm up. JLow

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