09 WR450 Rear Bottoming out

So I have a brand new 09 wr450 that I havent ridden at all yet. Just finished the free (or close to it) mods and was sitting on the bike and realized.... the rear suspension was bottomed out. If I bound the bike it definitely is plush then a very rigid stop at the bottom. I weight 200lbs.. now I know thats more than the "ideal" rider, but that seems extreme. Anything I should be checking? Just sitting on the bike there is only maybe 1 inch of silver rod still visible.

Crazy thing is I dont recall it doing that prior to be removing the shock to get to the carb... I say crazy because the shock only goes on & off one way.. So I highly doubt anything got screwed up with reassembly.

So I have a brand new 09 wr450 that I havent ridden at all yet. Just finished the free (or close to it) mods and was sitting on the bike and realized.... the rear suspension was bottomed out. If I bound the bike it definitely is plush then a very rigid stop at the bottom. I weight 200lbs.. now I know thats more than the "ideal" rider, but that seems extreme. Anything I should be checking? Just sitting on the bike there is only maybe 1 inch of silver rod still visible.

Crazy thing is I dont recall it doing that prior to be removing the shock to get to the carb... I say crazy because the shock only goes on & off one way.. So I highly doubt anything got screwed up with reassembly.

Have you set your sag?

Have you adjusted your clickers?

Many bikes, the WR included, get shipped with less that good oil in the shock and fork. A few hours of riding, and a little heat, and the oil is no good anymore. But it shouldn't bottom........

rear spring is too soft for you

I went upto a 6kg/mm spring, as I weigh about 210lbs

I've now got 28/103mm sag

As standard the rear spring was sagging 25/130mm which is just way to soft

Set your static sag, using the prelaod collar, so its 25mm

Measure you rider sag

I think you'll find its well over the 100mm mark

If it is you'll be needing a stiffer spring

rear spring is too soft for you

I went upto a 6kg/mm spring, as I weigh about 210lbs

I've now got 28/103mm sag

As standard the rear spring was sagging 25/130mm which is just way to soft

Set your static sag, using the prelaod collar, so its 25mm

Measure you rider sag

I think you'll find its well over the 100mm mark

If it is you'll be needing a stiffer spring

Does the 28 in 28/103 mean you have 28 mm of preload on the 6.0 spring? If so, that's way too much, especially at 210 lbs. Ideally, you want to get the right sag numbers without preloading the spring more than 15 mm. Anymore and you should be looking at a higher rate spring. Are you standing on the footpegs, centered over the bike, when taking measurements, or sitting? Sitting is not the right way to do it, especially if you are tall as you naturally push your weight further back on the bike, further skewing your readings.

No it means static sag is 28mm and rider sag is 103mm

Actual preload on the spring is less than 15mm

Yes its sitting, as I sit most of the time, but it made very little difference standing anyway

It works for me

No it means static sag is 28mm and rider sag is 103mm

Actual preload on the spring is less than 15mm

Yes its sitting, as I sit most of the time, but it made very little difference standing anyway

It works for me

:busted:

Who sets the intial sag... factory or dealer upon uncrating?

I havent set the race sag yet (I know thats supposed to be done first) but to get it at 25mm of static sag i seriously had to move the spring like an inch down. Was way off... almost bottoming out without a rider.. was set at 50mm.....

Ever hear of this?

Who sets the intial sag... factory or dealer upon uncrating?

I havent set the race sag yet (I know thats supposed to be done first) but to get it at 25mm of static sag i seriously had to move the spring like an inch down. Was way off... almost bottoming out without a rider.. was set at 50mm.....

Ever hear of this?

No one sets the sag.......but you.

Is there a better way to measure the rear shock without taking off the subframe? I want to see if I fall within the min & max allowed adjustments.

Is there a better way to measure the rear shock without taking off the subframe? I want to see if I fall within the min & max allowed adjustments.

Are you talking about measuring the spring's service limit?

It should be fine, unless the bike is worn out, which yours isn't.

I don't know of any other 'shock measurement'.........

You still haven't answered the questions about sag settings, or clicker adjustments........

Are you sure nobody let the "air" out of your shock either before you bought it or while it was off? I've had quite a few people look at the nitrogen nipple and ask about a need to fill it with air or goof around that area. The spring should hold it up, but it will be very easy to sag without a charge.

Are you 100% sure it's back together correctly and fully? Like you said, it only goes on one way but again, unless you're 280 lbs and the shock magically got set to the lowest preload on a brand new bike it should be fairly close factory. At least useable, I'd think. My 04 at pretty much factory settings works for me at 235 lbs.

I'd look at another similar year WR or YZ and make sure you are right with getti g it all together. And maybe have your shock recharged at your dealer to be sure.

Mike

You need a heavier spring and set your sag: http://www.tootechracing.com/suspension_tips.htm

To achieve proper sag (which means the bike won't understeer, won't bottom violently, won't ride rude due to ramping up because of too much weight) you should be around 100mm and adjust a few mm either way for personal preference.

The stock spring is set for a rider around 185-190 pounds. There is absolutely no way a rider 200 or more pounds can get a properly handling bike with the stock spring: it will behave as I wrote in the paragraph above. I'd say a vast majority just ride what they got but their bikes are not performing anywhere close to what it is capable of. Buying a new shock spring, installing it and resetting sag is a daunting task for most so they just run what they brung. Having too much sag takes away from the usable travel needed to suspend the bike and rider for the big hit. Basic example: if your WRF has 12 inches of travel and you need 4 inches of sag there is basilly 8 inches left for the big hit. When a rider has too much sag they are taking away from the suspension the linkage uses for the whoops, ditches, jumps, etc.

Having said that, I know of a WRF rider who let all the reservoir "air" out. Bottomed just sitting in the garage!

Not setting sag or being properly sprung is like buying an expensive pair of running shoes and not tying the laces. Yes, you can still walk and maybe run, but the efficiency will never be there no matter how many pairs of socks you put on to make up for the improper fit.

OK..

Race sag is 108, static is 25.

For the race sag I had my 35lb daughter sit on my shoulders while I stood up and had the wife measure... figured all my gear is right around that weight.

OK..

Race sag is 108, static is 25.

For the race sag I had my 35lb daughter sit on my shoulders while I stood up and had the wife measure... figured all my gear is right around that weight.

You could ride with that, but a stiffer spring would help with steering quality.

Thanks everyone for the input. I'm taking it out this Friday, next real trip is next month. Normally ride 4-500 Miles in Baja over a few days. My plan is to do it like this and then when I return and get through Christmas send her off to get the suspension all redone. Thinking $600 may get me close.

I'd get the basics set before throwing money at it. I've seen people drop one of the collars that go into the bottom of the shock. If the collar is missing and the bolt is tightened, it can bind giving some weird issues.

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