Octane booster. Anyone use it?

I'm running 92 pump gas. Would adding octane booster do any good? Also the guy in the back of the corner store owns a race team and he sells VP race gas for 10 bucks a gallon. Any advantages? I run his gas in my camaro when I take it to the track and I can feel the difference. It seems to run better and shave .002 off my et. What about my YZ400f? :thumbsup:

I have used octane booster before. I didn't notice any difference while riding, however I only ride woods, no track. I do use race gas mixed 50/50 for winter storage because the first winter I had my bike the crud gas we are now buying gummed up my carb and caused the float to stick. That was even using sta-bil. I would recommend the Lucasoctane boost as I have heard it is the only one on the market to actually raise the rating number by a couple full points.

Unless you are running high comp pistons or if you're bike is pinging, race gas or octane boosters won't help

In fact, they will make less power, the trick is to use the lowest octane you can without pinging

Be aware that octane boosters don't actually add the acclaimed 3 octane points. It's more like .3 per about 15 gallons.

Generally higher octane fuel also require different tuning to see the full benifits.

High octane fuel actually burns slower, this is benificial if you're running a tubo/sc high compression or really advanced timing because it's less likely to pre-ignite.

I run 91 (non ethanol) in my 06 yz450f and am happy with it, these bikes were designed to be ran on premium pump fuel.

I would be very suprised if anyone could actually feel a .002 difference in their ET.

High octane fuel actually burns slower, this is benificial if you're running a tubo/sc high compression or really advanced timing because it's less likely to pre-ignite.

Thats what I was going to say. High compression alone can Ignite the fuel before the spark.

I have 13.5-1 compression on my bike and all I run is 91 octane .

When I fill up my 5 gal cans I put 2.5 gal of 110 and 2.5 gal of 91. Runs fine.

They sell 100 oct at the pump here. I tried it one day. The bike did feel a bit stronger, but maybe there was some placebo affect in there? Never had any issue on typical premium though, so I'm not spending the $6.50 a gallon on the stuff.

Here we go again. Octane number of a fuel measures only its resistance to detonation under extreme heat and pressure. If you're not pinging on the fuel you run now, the added octane won't do anything.

Sometimes, some high octane fuels are just better fuels, as is the case with a lot of race fuels. People use them, see an improvement, and incorrectly credit that to higher octane. I know of at least one case where a commercially available high octane pump fuel made the bike run considerably worse, so it works both ways, but it's not the octane number that does that.

Oh yeah, and the 0.3 gain in octane number actually IS the 3 points they advertised.

So, the answer is no, octane booster won't do anything for you but drain your wallet.

Here we go again. Octane number of a fuel measures only its resistance to detonation under extreme heat and pressure. If you're not pinging on the fuel you run now, the added octane won't do anything.

You could run 89 octane in your bike and it will run just as good as higher octane but you risk damaging your engine if the fuel pre ignites.

You could run 89 octane in your bike and it will run just as good as higher octane but you risk damaging your engine if the fuel pre ignites.

No shit.

That's true, and in fact, the higher altitude you run at, the more appropriate lower octane fuels become. It's pretty safe to use 87 octane (as rated on US pumps) at above 5000 feet.

Another thing that often causes people to be unnecessarily concerned over octane number is the fact that the manual calls for 95 octane, and the typical highest octane premium normally available in the US is 91 or 92. The thing is that there are 3 different octane ratings systems, Research, Motor, and AKI (Anti-Knock Index).

The Research method produces the highest numbers, but is the least relevant to high performance engines. The Motor method is a lot more realistic testing cycle, but produces much lower numbers for fuels of the exact same detonation resistance. AKI is a US Government creation that takes the average of both, which is what that cryptic formula, R+M/2, on the gas pump is all about.

The manual calls for 95 Research Octane, the system in general use pretty much everywhere except North America, as far as I know. 95 Research is roughly equivalent to 86 Motor Octane, and if you average those two numbers, it comes up 90.5. So, 91 octane at a US gas pump meets the requirements, simple as that.

If you use anything higher then 91 pump gas you must do a little Re-jet even if the race gas is unleaded ,My advise keep it simple run pump gas if your trying to make a 400/426 or even 450 faster race gas isnt going to be an overall cheap salution ,1 time build ups like Hot Cams , big bore or buy a bigger bike or just ride faster. Iv heard of pro moto riders using a mild stock bike to race & be just as fast as there $30,000 Pro built bike.

If you use anything higher then 91 pump gas you must do a little Re-jet even if the race gas is unleaded
This is not necessarily true in every case. It is something that you should be aware of, but not all higher octane fuels will require any rejetting.

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