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KTMFarmer

Downside to Rekluse?

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There are some tradeoffs. I am not very up on this, maybe others will chime in.

1. you can not bump start the bike

2. If the motor goes off, it will roll in neutral, like backwards if on a hill.

advantages

1. you can rig your back brack to the old clutch lever. Which could be nice on really steep side hill trails where you can't reach your back brake pedal.

don't know that much about it but it sounds like I will stick to old technology.

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Rekluse has (3) distinct versions of the 'auto-clutch'

1. EXP 2.0: this is an expanding 'disc' that takes the place of a few clutch plates. It's primary goal is eliminate stalling, and improve traction on difficult surfaces. It also allows you to ride in a higher gear. It will not stall, but it will flame-out if you bike does that. It makes your clutch lever stiffer, and it no longer has adjustable position (cable slack). Basically, it 'self-modulates' the clutch upon take-off, and always keeps the rear wheel from spinning or stalling, until you get above the desired engagement point in RPMs. It adjusts with your clutch lever perch and with special engagement springs.

2. CORE EXP 2.0: Same as above, but replaces your entire clutch system with new Billet parts, and gets an improvement in how it adjusts, and how the clutch lever feels (like stock).

3. Z-Start Pro: This is the best of the best. Total adjustability, and abuseability is what you get here. No longer an expanding disc, but a series of ramps and stainless steel balls. This clutch feels and works great.

With all systems, you can still use your clutch lever, and disegage the clutch at any time. You can still fan the clutch.

With the EXP systems, you can still bump start, but not on the fly. You have to make an adjustment first.

With all systems, the motor is essentially in neutral once the bike stalls. But stalling it is not easy. I have stalled my EXP 2.0 (4) times in 20+ rides.

With the all systems, you can adjust it so the bike does not go into 'neutral' when you have stayed off the throttle; however you find it works better if you adjust the clutch they way they recommend. A quick blip of the throttle gets you back into full engine braking , and you stay there unless you come to a stop, at idle. Going down hill at idle speeds does not disengage the clutch; you have to stop moving first, or take off coasting down hill with no throttle.

Essentially, the bike feels 98% the same as before (a tiny bit of 'snap' is softened from the power delivery) until you get down near idle, or if you are in a gear too high. Then you feel the auto-clutch take over, and slowly and smoothly engage the clutch fcr you.

It's great for people like me who want to take an MX bike (tall first gear) on trail rides without gearing it down. It's also great for people who have trouble with hills, or rocks.

Edited by Krannie

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With all systems, you can still use your clutch lever , and disegage the clutch at any time. You can still fan the clutch.

Please explain how you adjust a Z-Start Pro to bump start.

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The only downside to is the price of admission.

Exactly

Some MX guys don't like the feel.

The EXP units take away a few clutch plates, so expect the remaining plates to wear a bit faster.

They make difficult hills or slippery sections much easier. Some say they make a C rider into a B rider.

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The EXP and Core EXP both work with a conventional type of pressure plate. The EXP removes plates from the original stack to make room for an expanding plate assembly, while the Core EXP is a more or less complete replacement clutch using the same technology. The expanding assembly is spring loaded and expands to a thicker dimension under centrifugal force, and the engagement can be adjusted by selecting lighter or heavier wedges and springs. Both adjust the cable so that the free travel is correct while the clutch is engaged, which causes the push rod to hold the pressure plate off the stack at idle. This also allows the readjustment of the cable so that the clutch will close at idle, allowing bump starts, and gives both clutches a normal feel under way, apart from the automatic engagement.

The EXP is not considered to be adequate for racing or severe use.

The Z-Start Pro is a different system that replaces the clutch boss and pressure plate. All of the springs in this system force the clutch open and disengage it. The pressure plate is a multi-part assembly that uses steel balls and ramps to apply pressure to the clutch stack as RPM rises. It can be tuned by spring selection and by adding/subtracting balls from the pressure assembly. It can be overridden by the bar lever in a conventional fashion, but the lever feel is unnaturally light. Some like this, some don't, and some don't care either way. There is also a lot of slack in the lever at low or no RPM.

Since the springs in the ZSP and the push rod do the same thing, open the clutch, removing all the slack you care to will not make the ZSP close up unless the engine runs, so it cannot be bump started under any circumstance.

Adjusted correctly, engine braking occurs in a normal manner because once the engine has engaged the clutch, it stays engaged until the RPM drops low enough. If you don't pull the clutch lever in, the trans will turn the engine, and the clutch will stay engaged regardless of how long you are off the throttle, until you come to near a stop. If you do pull the clutch and let it idle down, the clutch disengages, but as pointed out, a blip over idle will re-engage it.

The only downside to any of these is the inconvenience related to bump starting, a possible safety issue if you kick start the bike in gear without realizing it's not neutral, and the aforementioned lack of engine hold on a hill. In terms of advantages for tight off-road situations, there's really nothing better.

The majority (not all) off-roaders who have used both tend to prefer the ZSP over the core for various reasons mostly related to how smooth it is and the ease of tuning. MX'ers seem to gravitate to the Core EXP for its normal clutch feel.

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I run the pro on two of my bikes and love them. I still use my clutch regularly, but you really notice the rekluse when your deep into a 2hr mud harescramble and you come on a greasy hill that is full of ruts and roots. That point when you know that if you dont make the hill then its going to be a long day. The auto clutch kicks in and gives you the perfect clutch control and slipping. Once you get one you will love it.

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...you really notice the rekluse when your deep into a 2hr mud harescramble and you come on a greasy hill that is full of ruts and roots...
Or a set of 4 truck-sized silt whoops at the bottom of a rocky climb with 3 12" steps at the top followed by a hard left turn to avoid a drop off, followed by a check point, and you start the hill in second and don't shift or touch the clutch lever even once, just for example....

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Or a set of 4 truck-sized silt whoops at the bottom of a rocky climb with 3 12" steps at the top followed by a hard left turn to avoid a drop off, followed by a check point, and you start the hill in second and don't shift or touch the clutch lever even once, just for example....

....I know that section......:smashpc:

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Thanks for the info. Can you tell me what the difference is between the Z-Start and the Z-Start Pro? I have a chance to get a used Z-Start.

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Hey grayracer, you said something like the Core EXP is not meant for racing or abuse and that the z-start pro is the best. On the Rekluse website it says:

"Rekluse Core EXP – Core as in “Hard-Core,” is our award winning premier product. It is the #1 choice for performance minded riders that insist on perfect clutch lever feel that also demand the highest performance and durability available."

And it costs a bit more than the ZSP. Just wondering why the discrepancy. This is a good thread though because I had no idea on how these models were different and why one may be better than the other.

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Hey grayracer, you said something like the Core EXP is not meant for racing or abuse and that the z-start pro is the best. On the Rekluse website it says:

"Rekluse Core EXP – Core as in “Hard-Core,” is our award winning premier product. It is the #1 choice for performance minded riders that insist on perfect clutch lever feel that also demand the highest performance and durability available."

And it costs a bit more than the ZSP. Just wondering why the discrepancy. This is a good thread though because I had no idea on how these models were different and why one may be better than the other.

The ORIGINAL EXP was not as robust as the 2.0 version (all that is now available) and is a different design.

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Thanks for the info. Can you tell me what the difference is between the Z-Start and the Z-Start Pro? I have a chance to get a used Z-Start.
The Z-Start was the first one they produced. It was offered with no way to override the clutch manually. Then, a kit was produced to go with it to restore the manual override, but you could only use it at lower RPM because the clutch would fight you at higher speeds. The Z-Start Pro is an improvement on the original that retains manual override at all speeds, along with improved operation overall.
Hey grayracer, you said something like the Core EXP is not meant for racing or abuse and that the z-start pro is the best.
You need to reread my post, because that's not what I said. The CORE EXP is a full house racing clutch using the EXP principal. The Z-Start Pro is also a racing grade clutch using the original Z-Start fundamentals. The EXP (NOT the Core EXP) is the one that is the weaker one.

I also did not say, "the Z-Start Pro is best". I said a higher percentage of off-roaders prefer it to the Core EXP. Read again.

As far as the EXP, the nothing about unit itself is what makes it a weaker clutch. The fact is that you have to reduce the number of plates in the OEM clutch to install it, so it's just a matter of there being less clutch doing the same job. A lot of recreational riders use it and do OK with it.

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Darn. I thought you knew something I could use.
Me too. I haven't learned anything new today and I need to fill my quota :smashpc:

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