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wgetty01

Post sand dune riding clean up

15 posts in this topic

Made it to the dunes this weekend and had a blast! However i know sand is everywhere on my bike. I cleaned it as I usually do after I ride however I know there is more sand in places unknown. Where or what should I disassemble to clean specifically next to tearing the entire bike apart? I'm only going to ride there once or twice a year and this was my first go at it.

Any pointers would be much appreciated! Thanks!

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I would not use a pressure washer. just use you regular hose. all i would do extra is take off your air box after washing your bike thoroughly and clean the inside of your air box make sure you put a rag in you carb. i would also clean my chain vary good also.

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I would not use a pressure washer.
Neither would I. PW's are an great way to ruin sealed chains, steering head bearings, etc.

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Spray down with a hose, spray with cleaner, and rinse off...

I check the air box, and take the carb off to look for evidence of sand "leakage"

That's about it. I ride with guys that almost ONLY ride in the dunes, and most of them dont even clean thier bikes after and they last forever.

My motto "don't be over cautious" :thumbsup:

Edited by YamahaDoc

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Like the others have said, give it a regular cleaning then take the airbox off and pressure wash the crap out of it. There IS sand in all those little nooks and crannies that needs to come out. Obviously clean your air filter very well also.

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Neither would I. PW's are an great way to ruin sealed chains, steering head bearings, etc.

pressure washers are great.

just hold it back away from the chain, bearing areas and electrical connections or any area that may secomb to high pressure water. just hold the cleaner back over a foot away.

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I ride only in sand. It's not the sand that gets you, it's moisture!!

I made the mistake of lubing my chain because it looked rusty when I first got the bike - big mistake - just makes a nice grinding paste when it meets sand.

I now always just rinse down with water. The only place sand will stick is in the airbox and to any other bits of the bike where oil/grease/lube is sitting (around breathers and the like). Watch out for it gathering around the axles - it can get wedged around the chain adjusters (on any greasy bits in particular), so whip your axles out occasionally and give the area around them a good cleaning.

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pressure washers are great.

just hold it back away from the chain, bearing areas and electrical connections or any area that may secomb to high pressure water. just hold the cleaner back over a foot away.

X2, I've used pressure washers exclusively for 12 years and never had an issue. I'm mindful of not hitting the chain/linkage or any pivot points, but aside from that they're all I use. I should mention that I clean/re-grease my swingarm bearings once a year and clean/re-grease my linkage every 20 hours or run time. If you're not re-packing your bearings with grease every so often then I might be even more cautious.

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I'm mindful of not hitting the chain/linkage or any pivot points, but aside from that they're all I use.
The problem is that not everyone is as smart as you, not everyone knows the hazards, and too few realize that it's much easier to screw things up by pressure washing than it is to avoid it.

Just sayin'...

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The problem is that not everyone is as smart as you, not everyone knows the hazards, and too few realize that it's much easier to screw things up by pressure washing than it is to avoid it.

Just sayin'...

That's what is so great about forums like this one, you can pose a question and get information resulting in an informed decision. To make a blanket statement like this "Never use a pressure washer", doesn't seem to make that much sense to me. The convenience a pressure washer offers, VS the risk(s) associated with it's use makes it an easy choice for me.

:thumbsup:

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Thanks for the pointers. I changed the air filter between day one and day two but will go through and completely clean the air filter(s) and box. I knew pressure washers were good as long as you dont blast certain areas.

Whats the best way to thoroughly clean the chain aside from a scrub brush or is that all that is needed?

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i just got back from florence. This is new to me but I think I had some of the most fun on a dirtbike last week. I am heading over to pull maintance today after only a once over with the pressure washer saturday.

just curious where did you go at the coast? your not from Bend are you?

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pressure washers clean wheels very well swingarm, plastics and engine guards whats left is the electrical can be done with degreasers anyone who has ever had a problem washing would know pressure washers are nice to have

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Thanks for the pointers. I changed the air filter between day one and day two but will go through and completely clean the air filter(s) and box. I knew pressure washers were good as long as you dont blast certain areas.

Whats the best way to thoroughly clean the chain aside from a scrub brush or is that all that is needed?

i soak/submerge mine in a tub of old gearbox oil and leave it out in the sun to warm up. i only do this to older chains that have had the lube dried up. the oil seems to soak through past the seals and the chain becomes much easier to move around.

i know some on here will bitch that the "seals will swell" blah,blah,blah, but i think the seals hold up well to it. and as stated, i only do it once the chain starts showing signs of stiffness anyway.

let it hang up for a few hours then wipe it down with a rag and your done for another 15 rides

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