Are you supposed to feel sore and fatigued after riding?

Just picked up an '03 YZ450F, been tooling around in the woods where I will be doing 90% of my riding. I am not huge into racing, going fast, or otherwise balls-to-the-wall riding. Simply going out and having some fun, you know? fast once in awhile, but mostly just chilling out.

Anyways, the other day I went trailriding for about 45 minutes and I just felt kind of "hunched over" whenever I was standing, and my wrists hurt every once and awhile (especially throttle side). It made me wonder if I need to do something, or change something with the handlebars/suspension. Suspension I am currently looking into and will report back about adjusting that, since it is apparently such a common item of discussion there is an entire sub-forum for it.

My question to you guys: does it matter that the previous owner was 5'7" and 150lbs soaking wet, while I am 6'4" and about 220 soaking wet? (as far as handlebar positioning/spacers/rake)?

Gotta work on suspension too I think :busted:

love the forum BTW :excuseme:

Yes your supposed to feel sore ans fatigued after riding, but from the sounds of it, your suffering from a different type, the improper setup type.

Sounds like you could benefit from some taller bars to assist with you being in a more upright riding position.

I put bar risers on my 426 - just brought the bars up by about 2 inches. It was a transformation in terms of reducing fatigue and all round rideability.

I also lifted the gear change lever one notch on the spline and lowered the back brake pedal a little to suit where my feet and boots felt most comfortable.

Just these three little changes have transformed the feel of the bike, to the extent that my mate, who is a few inches shorter, loves the feel of it and has commented that it just feels better setup than his stock 450.

I'm only six foot, so I'd say you definitely need to make a few changes!

Just picked up an '03 YZ450F, been tooling around in the woods where I will be doing 90% of my riding. I am not huge into racing, going fast, or otherwise balls-to-the-wall riding. Simply going out and having some fun, you know? fast once in awhile, but mostly just chilling out.

Anyways, the other day I went trailriding for about 45 minutes and I just felt kind of "hunched over" whenever I was standing, and my wrists hurt every once and awhile (especially throttle side). It made me wonder if I need to do something, or change something with the handlebars/suspension. Suspension I am currently looking into and will report back about adjusting that, since it is apparently such a common item of discussion there is an entire sub-forum for it.

My question to you guys: does it matter that the previous owner was 5'7" and 150lbs soaking wet, while I am 6'4" and about 220 soaking wet? (as far as handlebar positioning/spacers/rake)?

Gotta work on suspension too I think :busted:

love the forum BTW :excuseme:

I'm so old, I get sore and fatigued just thinking about my upcoming ride ! :busted:

Seriously you will absolutely get tired and fatigued . Sounds like you are just getting back into serious riding ? A MX bike is extremly physically demanding period. The more you ride the better your affiliated muscles will get. Another negitive factor of fatigue (peticulary your arms) is holding on to the bars too tight, and simply being nerveous. Try to relax on the bike, and hold on to the bars, but not too tight. I also strongly suggest a Scott's steering danpener. Damepeners absorb front end impact and allow the rider to much more relax your grip on the bars. The '03 YZ's were notorious for brutal hard hitting power, and not very trail friendly. Add a flywheel weight to mellow out the bottom to mid engine hit.

I'm nearly 50. Usually after the first couple of rides I'm OK. There is definately some conditioning involved.

If I take a month off riding for whatever crazy reason, and get back on for a hard and gnarly ride, afterward I feel like someone put me in a football game. Without pads.

Stretch, hydrate, ride, repeat.

At your height vs the previous owner you probably need to make some control adjustments and maybe different bend in handle bars. Try the free adjustments first;

- Handlebar forward or back

To get an idea of location I have always used this trick as a starting point for adjusting: sit on your bike in your normal riding position, raise your arms straight over you head (hands up style) and let them drop. They will land on your handlebars, move your bars so when you drop your arms they naturally land with your hands on your grips. From this point go ride and make minor forward or back adjustments. On my 426 i found the bars to be wider than what I liked so I bought bars slightly narrower with less pull back bend and now feel much more in control = less fatigue.

- Hand controls - clutch and brake levers

Put you bike on a stand and get on it standing up in your standing riding position. Check the reach to your levers and adjust them (probably down) so your wrists are not bent up to comfortably reach them. This really helps for the standing trail riding work.

- Shift lever

Stand or sit; but probably better standing on your bike with your riding boot on and see if your foot can naturally slip under your shift lever. Move the lever (probably up one notch) so your foot does not need to bend down or up too far to get a click.

- Rear brake lever

Same drill as the shift lever, I have found on my 426 that the lever does not have enough adjustment to go low enough for my liking, but on the other hand the big four stroke has enough engine compression that i don't use the rear brake so much as on my 2 stroke.

After you get all this dialed start working your suspension adjustments. I am also 220lb (6ft) and have been tweaking my suspension for the trail riding I like to do vs the track setting the stock setup is designed for.

And finally, yes that big 426 will work the hell out of you and you will be tired and sore.

I also have an 03 YZF. Here's what I've done to make the bike easier to ride. I'm 5-11, 190 lbs.

7 oz Steahly flywheel weight, (a heavier weight would work better for woods riding)

Scotts top triple clamp and sub mount damper (raises bars 1/2 inch)

Pro-Action suspension revalve for MX riding

Tall seat

Good luck!

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