2010 yz450f necessary Prep BEFORE 1'st ride ?

after reading this link from the Kawasaki 250f specific section (this thread link was linked directly from their stickied FAQ) http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=842778 I am wondering how much -or all- of this "Pre - 1'st ride" Prep work needs to be or should be done ?

I have already ridden my new 2010 450f maybe 10-15 minutes mind you.

if you didn't bother reading the link, then, what would the suggested pre 1'st ride prep on a brand spankin new 2010 yz450 be ?

For mine the first thing I did was drain the oil and change the filter even though they were brand new from the factory, you never know until you do it yourself.

I checked the coolant and I took the air filter and washed it in diesel and then soap and water and let dry. Re-oiled it with the oil of my choice. I checked tire pressure and chain slack and then I started the bike. I warmed it up to about 90 degrees and turned it off, checking all over for leaks.

After it cooled off a bit I took it up and down my street for a little 2 minute run to make sure everything was ok. While riding I would preload the suspension with my weight up and down quite a bit to make sure that the linkage/swingarm bearings were working properly.

I then tested both the front and rear brakes, after this I shut her off and checked for leaks again.

That's it, I took it out two days later and broke it in with low-mid throttle for about an hour. Let her cool and then went all out and rode the bike for another hour, had a blast.

I changed the oil and filter again, just to get all the assembly grease and any other building grease/crap out of the system.

have fun with it!

Leave the timing/fueling alone for the first ride, then put in the jay marmot map for the second and you can really feel the difference!

The link you provided is pretty detailed, but I have to disagree with the red loctite on the linkage bolts. The nuts on the 2010 linkage have locking washers in them and they will not back out if you torque them properly.

Read your manual and look at the general maint area, that's pretty much what you need to know.

It was only after the first 4-6 hours of riding that I did a teardown and checked for grease, in which I re-greased but the bike didn't need it at all. This comes down to how good your dealer is at bike prep.

I'm not going to even bother calling them (dealer) and getting 2'nd hand information as to how well they prepped the bike.. I will probably get fed a line anyways

I will be getting my hands dirty this weekend, thanks guys..

You might wanna invest in a good chain cause the one on it is a total pile and needs adjusting every 30 min of riding and its not to good on the sprockets.

Dealer tried to tell me it was a good chain that came with it. I will replace it eventually, but going to change the sprockets anyways.

Dealer tried to tell me it was a good chain that came with it. I will replace it eventually, but going to change the sprockets anyways.

Might be good for a scooter!

Yeah thats what I did too (just rode it). Chain was shot or past shot at about 15 hrs so I just got a good regina and cheap steel sprockets.

Might be good for a scooter!

Yeah thats what I did too (just rode it). Chain was shot or past shot at about 15 hrs so I just got a good regina and cheap steel sprockets.

I've had the bike two weekends, adjusted chain after first, didn't even ride it that much second weekend and its time to adjust it again. My old bike has an O-ring chain that hasn't been adjusted in 3 years, of course I don't ride it a ton but still it doesn't budge.

My chain lasted about 10 hours before it started to get pretty loose, I gave it to my brother who's chain was just sagging off the rear sprocket, he was pretty happy!

Bought a pro taper front and rear with a DID chain, it's been 12 hours and the slack has just reached 3" from the 2.5 that I set it at, slower rate than stock...

I didn't go with an o-ring cause they're thicker and the chain is already pretty close to the frame especially when it's flying around with a bit of slack. Didn't want it to chew up the frame so I went with a regular chain. Also, regular chaines are MUCH easier to get the master link in, where as the o-ring requires plyers and a lot of swearing and cursing.

was only after the first 4-6 hours of riding that I did teardown and checked for grease, in which I re-greased but the bike didn't need it at all. This comes down to how good your dealer is at bike prep.

Grease question: I've got Bel Ray waterproof grease (the blue stuff in the white tub) . . . is that compatible with the grease that comes from the Yamaha factory in the rear suspension linkage?

I've got my shock off to swap springs, so I figure I'll grease it while it's apart but want to be sure the greases are compatible.

It will work fine.

It was only after the first 4-6 hours of riding that I did a teardown and checked for grease, in which I re-greased but the bike didn't need it at all. This comes down to how good your dealer is at bike prep.

The dealer does not grease anything. They, basically assemble the front wheel, handlebars, front fender, and a few other little things. The bikes comes from Yamaha with the airfilter oiled and filled with oil.

I brought mine to my shop and stripped it to go through all of it. Made sure there was an adequate amount of grease throughout the chassis bearings, torqued all linkage bolts, loosened all major bolts, including engine mounts, and torqued to spec, safety wired grips, and other necessary items, set tire pressure, checked spokes, checked air filter, and basically went through and made sure everything was prepped as it should be. I've got two hours until my 15 hour service, which I will re check all major bolts, check to make sure the grease in all bearings is still adequate, and service/revalve my suspension to my liking and I should be good.

The chain stretching is what wears the sprocket out...If you wait until the chain is worn, chances are the sprocket is worn as well, and will likewise affect the "new" chain you put on it, as the teeth will already be "further apart" due to the original chain stretching. The last 2 450fs I have owned have had the stock chain replaced before I ever took the bike out. Strangely enough, while not nearly good enough quality for the 450, that chain will last quite nicely on a 2 stroke. I have an EG 300 that rarely requires adjustment of that take-off chain, and on my vintage YZ 360, It seems to go forever...:thumbsup:

Might be good for a scooter!

Yeah thats what I did too (just rode it). Chain was shot or past shot at about 15 hrs so I just got a good regina and cheap steel sprockets.

I've always had luck with DID chains, which came stock on my bike.

But it's the non oring DID gold chain that comes on the white LE models . . . does a diff chain come stock on the blue bikes?

FWIW I have always used oring chains, which last longer and need less adjustment than non oring chains. Guess their disadvantage is more weight.

I've always had luck with DID chains, which came stock on my bike.

But it's the non oring DID gold chain that comes on the white LE models . . . does a diff chain come stock on the blue bikes?

Gold cad plating does not make a premium chain. Like most manufacturers of quality roller chain, DID makes chains in a wide range of qualities and wear resistance. The black chain on the blue bikes and the plated chain on the are both at the very low end of the product line, and should be replaced right after the brand new bike is ridden up and down the street enough times to impress the neighbor kids.

With a good quality chain like the Regina ORN6, the stock sprockets will last a good year at least.

Gold cad plating does not make a premium chain. Like most manufacturers of quality roller chain, DID makes chains in a wide range of qualities and wear resistance. The black chain on the blue bikes and the plated chain on the are both at the very low end of the product line, and should be replaced right after the brand new bike is ridden up and down the street enough times to impress the neighbor kids.

With a good quality chain like the Regina ORN6, the stock sprockets will last a good year at least.

OH I figured that about the color, but being a DID, I thought the quality might be better than what you're saying about throwing it away immediately.

I didn't realize DID made that cheap of a chain. I'll leave it on at least for break and since I wanna swap rear sprockets anyway, to gear it down a bit.

I've had good luck with the DID X-ring chains, how would that compare to the ORN6? (is the orn6 oring or xring?)

ORN6 is standard o-ring no fancy stuff and IMO the best chain for the price. I'll never buy anything else again. Of course I gotta wear this one out yet which will take a long while :thumbsup:

It's an O-ring. They make a "Z" ring (the seal cross section is Z shaped), the ZRH. Same idea; reduce seal drag by making them lip seals instead of O-rings, but IMO, seal drag is of very much exaggerated importance, and all the X, Z, and alphabet soup is a pricy gimmick.

The ORN6 is an extremely sturdy chain with very excellent wear qualities comparable to pretty much anything on the market, but sells for significantly less than the high end DID chains do. A much better value, IMO.

Good info about the chains, I will probably try out one of those Regina's.

Thanks guys!

As far as getting those regina's from rocky mountain, order the longer size 120, I waited for a 116 for 2 months till I finally decided to call and change it. Back order ftl, so now I can put my new sprockets on this weekend and grease some bearings. Wish I had dirt to ride it on though.

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