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Merc1212

Laying EFI bike down on ground

21 posts in this topic

So you're out practicing and you come up on a kid trapped under his bike. Or you're out trail riding and there's nothing around to lean the bike on. I always did everything I could to keep my carbed bike upright thinking it would be a pain to start afterwards if I didn't. Do the new EFI bikes still have this problem, or is it safe to let them rest on their sides for extended periods?

Thanks

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even carbed bikes are easy to start after this, if you know the drill

hold throttle wide open, cycle engine a few times, let go of throttle, kick, they start up

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yeah no problem, I lay mine down if im in the middle of no where and have to pee or when someone takes a dive and needs help. Only real difference is no fuel leaking out.

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I used the excuse on a trail ride the other week.

"Can't lay it down, no kickstand, I'll get the next tree. Flooding. Bad." *hands waving to nothing and back to bike and gesturing like a Home Shopping Network host.

Of course I was joking and did my part in clearing trail.

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Not a problem. Carbed bikes flood when laid over because part of the fuel in the bowl runs into the intake port. If you leave the gas on, this naturally becomes a continuous process, and gets that much worse.

With EFI, unless the engine is running, there is no fuel delivered anywhere, so no flooding occurs. The engine should restart normally regardless of having been laid down.

The engine will also run perfectly well in any position in which fuel will enter the pump from the tank. BTW, Yamaha uses a tip-over sensor in the ECU that will shut the bike off if it goes too far over.

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"BTW, Yamaha uses a tip-over sensor in the ECU that will shut the bike off if it goes too far over."

well they must have deleted it or made an major adjustment on JS bike. he throws out some sick whips LOL.

but that info is very helpful. i wonder how Gray knows what he knows? it's amazing

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I crashed last weekend in which I was in quite a bit of pain and could not get the bike up at all. I was sitting beside my bike trying to breath and the bike kept on running for about 30 seconds and then shutoff.

After about 10 minutes or so my buddy came back and helped me out and we both got the bike back up. Trying to kick the bike over in pain it started after 1 kick! Bike was stalled out on the ground for about 10 minutes before it was picked back up and started.

These bikes do not flood, even on their side with the engine running, just doesn't happen. I've done this about 5-6 times now and I have found that the bike always cuts out after about 30 seconds or so. I think that there must be some kind of sensor in the ECU to detect falls in which it will kill the bike automatically, maybe I'm wrong..

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I think that there must be some kind of sensor in the ECU to detect falls in which it will kill the bike automatically, maybe I'm wrong..
There is, as I said. The person who discovered this feature was one who installed a Honda style steering damper on his bike. In the process, he temporarily relocated the ECU by stuffing it under the gas tank, but it lay on its side, and he couldn't get it to run until he re-oriented it to a vertical position again. Yamaha verified the presence of the sensor, or he might never have figured it out.

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What about oil......does trans oild leak out when laid over? If not, maybe I'll just lay the bike on its side when in the pits to confuse my competiters......LOL

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What about oil......does trans oild leak out when laid over?
The transmission uses engine oil and has no separate supply of its own. But, the engine should not leak any significant oil when lying on it's side.

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There is, as I said. The person who discovered this feature was one who installed a Honda style steering damper on his bike. In the process, he temporarily relocated the ECU by stuffing it under the gas tank, but it lay on its side, and he couldn't get it to run until he re-oriented it to a vertical position again. Yamaha verified the presence of the sensor, or he might never have figured it out.

I gotta learn to read... not sure how I missed that in this thread.

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I wonder how long it takes for the sensor. Could a big whip at the dunes, going vert, make it puke? Yamaha suuuurely had to give it a decent time to stay "activated."

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I wonder how long it takes for the sensor. Could a big whip at the dunes, going vert, make it puke? Yamaha suuuurely had to give it a decent time to stay "activated."

From what's posted in this thread, it looks like around 20-30 seconds.

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There was a guy here having issues when doing jumps and landing with his bike cutting out... Never checked up on the thread but makes me wonder if this sensor had something to do with his issue? The sensor only kills the bike after 20 seconds or so, too long for a regular jump, but maybe his was faulty...

I wonder if it's easy enough to disassembly the ECU and disable this portion for testing purposes in his case..

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It's plausible. But dismantling the ECU is not possible. They are a sealed solid state unit.

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It's too bad that the tuner didn't have an option to disable this feature for testing purposes, would be alot easier than just doing what the manual recommends "replace ECU" which costs a fortune...

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i love my new 450 but when reading these threads some folks are going to be banging there heads againt a wall when these get older with all the sensors

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i love my new 450 but when reading these threads some folks are going to be banging there heads againt a wall when these get older with all the sensors

perhaps but if one would embrace it with a positve additude FI systems are very easy to diagnose problems.....way less comlplicated than some would have you believe.

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