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JTM18

09 YZ450F (55hrs)

12 posts in this topic

I just reached the 55 hr mark on my 09 yz450f. I was just wondering what if anything needs to be done to it maintenance wise. Does the bike need to be re-greased and where? Do the valves need to be checked? Top end? Anything that YOU would do to your bike if you haven't done anything to it besides change oil and air filter on regular basis.

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Here's what I've done to mine during the course of my 41.7 hours :

April/10 - New bike Greased linkage, swingarm and steering head bearings.

April 30/10 Fork oil (both chambers) and shock fluid replaced @ 10.2 hours

June 18/10 New fork & shock springs, replaced outer chamber oil in forks @ 20.3 hours

July 8/10 Linkage bearings cleaned/re-greased 27.7 hours

July 8/10 Pro Circuit can re-packed 27.7 hours

July 21/10 Fork oil (both chambers) and shock fluid replaced @ 30.8hrs, 10.5 hours on oil in outer chambers, 20.6 hours on upper cartridge and shock oil.

August 13/10 Right intake 0.0055 Mid intake 0.0045 Left intake 0.0045 Both ex. 0.0085

August 14/10 Cleaned carb. & lubed throttle & clutch cables. 36.3 hours

The above doesn't include engine oil/filter changes, when I've lubed the clutch & throttle cables or any of the other basic maint. I do. I'd want to change the fork/shock oil(s), re-grease the linkage/steering head/swingarm bearings, check your valves and clean the carb out at 55 hours.

:ride:

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If you have never greased your wheel , linkage, swingarm bearings by now they are probably toast. Mine got greased at 1 hour and they needed it.

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Where is your manual. What needs to be done is in the book

i would replace the piston and ringsat this time and refresh suspension fluids if it has been any longer than 25 hours since you have done that.also i would regrease linkage and steering stem,lube and inspect all cables,replace packing in muffler and give everything a good looking over for any signs of wear.also while doing top end check valve clearances of course.this is what i would do if you were a fast intermediate and up,with track riding and racing involved,otherwise if your just play riding and trail riding i would go a little longer before i would do a top end,say 75 hours-thats just off the top of my head for now-mike

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i would replace the piston and rings at this time

That's a bit excessive, don't you think, unless he does nothing but race the bike full time?

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that's a bit excessive, don't you think, unless he does nothing but race the bike full time?

x2...

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That's a bit excessive, don't you think, unless he does nothing but race the bike full time?

i did say if hes a racer,otherwise it would be,i think i mentioned that too

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I would grease all of the bearings.

Remove the rear wheel , swing arm, shock and linkage and get organized on a table.

Do one bearing at a time and make sure that you count how many roller bearings came out so you know how many to put back in. They're small and easy to lose :ride:.

Take your bearings and dump them in a clean pop bottle with some kerosene or diesel (about a cup) in the bottom. Put the cap on and shake well, dump them out on a paper towel and dry.

Clean out the race of the bearing with paper towels or degreaser, whatever your prefer and apply a nice thick layer of marine grease inside the race.

Place the needle bearings back in (they stick, so you don't have to worry about them falling out before you insert your bushing) and clean up your bushing and put that back in.

The dust seals can be re-used, but if you want you can replace them.

The steering head bearings should also be re-greased, remove your forks and handle bars. Remove the triple clamp bolt and remove the upper clamp. Remove the steering head nut (I Use a clutch holding tool, works great for this) and slide the lower clamp with stem and bearing out. The upper bearing is free and not pressed onto the stem, so you can clean that up in diesel, dry and re-pack it. The lower bearing because it is pressed on is tough to clean, you can go all the way but it may be tricky.

I would probably soak the whole assembly in a tub of diesel cleaning out the bearing and then dry it off. Use some grease and heat it up so that it's runny (I have not tried this yet, just a theory I think would work btw) and pour it onto the bearing letting the grease get into the roller bearings like as if you were to pack it.

Realistically though I would just wipe it off and apply some new grease as best you can.

The races are in the frame and should be cleaned off with a paper towel, apply a bit of grease there as well for the hell of it.

Upper shock bearing (at least on my 250) is a special one that cannot be removed and cleaned like the needle bearings of the rest of the bike. I usually rotate it at all angle and clean it as best I can with a paper towel and apply some new grease to it, doesn't need much.

Leaving this too long will have you smacking yourself in the face, I assure you. These bearings rust easily and if you trail ride through water crossings and mud holes, you usually have to do this twice a season if you ride lots or else you get siezed bearings.

When they're siezed (the needle bearings) you can re-use them if they are not broken, they do not require the precise tolerances like bearings in an engine or your front/rear wheel. But if they are heavily pitted and/or broken, buy a new one.

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That's a bit excessive, don't you think, unless he does nothing but race the bike full time?

I had an 06 with 50 hrs on it and replaced the rings and piston. I raced this bike every weekend the whole year (some weekends they werent a race).

Measured the piston and rings and they werent even worn. just replaced new parts with new parts.

My 2010 450 has 20 some odd hrs. on it now and I,m not going to replace the piston and rings til 100 hrs.

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there is alot of factors involving piston wear ,one persons 50 hours are not equal to another.if you ride hard and race its not unheard of to replace the top end at 55 hours,not to mention it just makes good sense.very pricey repair when these babies DO let go.much cheaper to be proactive,thats my opinion take it or leave it-regards mike

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I just reached the 55 hr mark on my 09 yz450f. I was just wondering what if anything needs to be done to it maintenance wise. Does the bike need to be re-greased and where? Do the valves need to be checked? Top end? Anything that YOU would do to your bike if you haven't done anything to it besides change oil and air filter on regular basis.

I would take the entire bike apart. Swingarm, head bearings, ect. If the motor run good, leave it alone. Clean, inspect,replace where necessary, everything else.

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