Cheating with a 2010

The three things that really matter...

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I understand the first two, but what's the bottom picture showing me?

I'm afraid I don't get it...

Wait! I think I got it, Rekluse, good suspension and over sized brakes?!

oversized rotor dude.

"powerful brakes"

You don't see the oversized rotor kit? :)

'vince', What's your opinion so far of the suspension versus the stock '10?

what kinda offroad riding are you doing to need oversize rotors?

Can you feel my jealousy from here?

Its great on the small stuff gray, soaks up near everything I want it to, but still bottoms on real hard hits, I've tried one click harder on the compression, but it made the small stuff really harsh. I think I may try adding 3cc's of oil per leg.

I am definitely open to suggestions since I know you understand the SPI stuff fairly well.

EDIT: Since I didn't answer the full question, against the stock suspension, the SPI revalve kit makes everything more manageable for my weight. Im about 200lbs, and a slow B rider. The stock suspension would ride too far down in the stroke for it to do any good on the big hits, and it made the small chop harsher because it handled all of it in the midstroke. Now the SPI suspension rides higher in the stroke and sort of just bounces over the small stuff, and uses more of the stroke on hard hits, but like I said, it still bottoms on hard landings.

Edited by almostinvincible119
Didn't answer full question
what kinda offroad riding are you doing to need oversize rotors?

MX, and you would not believe how much better they are over stock. Running into corners beside someone with stock brakes, you can tell in the last 25 feet that the person with oversized brakes is able to touch them at the last minute, while the rider with stock brakes is braking for that full 25 feet.

Short version: They're wonderful

Its great on the small stuff gray, soaks up near everything I want it to, but still bottoms on real hard hits, I've tried one click harder on the compression, but it made the small stuff really harsh. I think I may try adding 3cc's of oil per leg.
You are using the heavier SPI #5 in the outer chambers? Springs for your weight? If so, adding a bit of oil to beef up the air spring will help. The air spring effect is pretty progressive. You may want more than 3 more cc per side, though. How much oil are you running now, and, have you talked to Dave?
Its great on the small stuff gray, soaks up near everything I want it to, but still bottoms on real hard hits, I've tried one click harder on the compression, but it made the small stuff really harsh. I think I may try adding 3cc's of oil per leg.

I am definitely open to suggestions since I know you understand the SPI stuff fairly well.

EDIT: Since I didn't answer the full question, against the stock suspension, the SPI revalve kit makes everything more manageable for my weight. Im about 200lbs, and a slow B rider. The stock suspension would ride too far down in the stroke for it to do any good on the big hits, and it made the small chop harsher because it handled all of it in the midstroke. Now the SPI suspension rides higher in the stroke and sort of just bounces over the small stuff, and uses more of the stroke on hard hits, but like I said, it still bottoms on hard landings.

Is the SPI kit you got, called the Dell Taco kit with the EPNP and clover with the 215.VM2.K5 fluid in the shock and forks?

This is the SPI kit that i have in my 2010 450F. My local tuner that is at the tracks about every sunday has been working on dialing it in for me. He knows Dave Johnson and got this kit for me to go in my bike cause he said it would really help it a lot.

It has really helped alot on the big deep breaking bumps, soaks it all up and does well on the small also but I'm having a little problem with the rear want to kick out a little off of pointed jumps or jumps that have been chewed on at the lip if you will.

I went harder on the rebound and it helped some and took the kick out but it still has a little. My tuner told me yesterday to go down one turn on the spring and try to strive for "what he likes for the static sag to be" 35mm.

I set my rider sag at 98mm with a true static of 33mm, what i mean by true static sag is first (with the bike off the stand push down firmly and fast on the rear of the seat a couple of times and measure the static sag) in my case this was 36mm.

Then grab the rear fender about at the seat bolts and lift up on the rear fender and slowly let it fall under its own weight. in my case this was 30mm. i then met the measurement in the middle which was 33mm and that was my true static sag.

I'm going to try it there this coming sunday at the practice track and see if the rear settled down any after i hit a jump. Hope it takes that little swing to the side out.

One other thing it was doing was when i hit a jump like the table top at the race this sunday. i noticed on the video the wife took that the front was wanting to stay up and not fall down any when i was about to land.

In other words when I hit the jump I kinda was landing with the rear tire lower than the front instead of the front tire diving down some toward the angle of the backside of the table top.

I have the forks pretty well dialed in with the compression at 10 out and the rebound at 10 clicks out. My high speed comp on the rear is turned all the way out and the rear low comp is 10 out and rebound is 10 out.

I believe this will be a really good suspension once i get all the kinks ironed out. I just need to do a little more testing with the preload to find the sweet spot.

You are using the heavier SPI #5 in the outer chambers? Springs for your weight? If so, adding a bit of oil to beef up the air spring will help. The air spring effect is pretty progressive. You may want more than 3 more cc per side, though. How much oil are you running now, and, have you talked to Dave?

No, havent talked to Dave yet, didn't really want to burden him without trying to add oil first, maybe I should call him and see what he would suggest. But Im running 360cc's per side and yes, I am using SPI-3 in the upper chamber and SPI-5 in the lower chamber. The springs are probably a little soft for my weight, but Dave set the valving up to get around having to purchase springs.

Just got the shock done, getting it charged with nitrogen tomorrow and we'll see how she works out. But if its anything like the forks, it will be leaps and bounds better over stock.

I called dave about mine to discuss what I had and he had the blueprint of my suspension and told me what was done to it according to what I told my tuner and then he relayed the info to dave so he could buld the kit for my skill level and weight.

He told me to call anytime if I needed any help but said i was in good hands and company with my tuner.

No, havent talked to Dave yet, didn't really want to burden him without trying to add oil first, maybe I should call him and see what he would suggest. But Im running 360cc's per side and yes, I am using SPI-3 in the upper chamber and SPI-5 in the lower chamber.
Try the oil level adjustment, but note that 365 cc is the max recommended by Yamaha. Frankly, it may even act different with the reworked shock in place, too. Don't worry about calling him, he expects it, and he'd rather help you clear something up than fool around and be frustrated by it.

...

One other thing it was doing was when i hit a jump like the table top at the race this sunday. i noticed on the video the wife took that the front was wanting to stay up and not fall down any when i was about to land.

In other words when I hit the jump I kinda was landing with the rear tire lower than the front instead of the front tire diving down some toward the angle of the backside of the table top.

...

Try less rebound damping in the back.

It might just be your form. Stiffer legs or shifting the weight back a little will cause more rebound off the face and bring the front down.

Is the SPI kit you got, called the Dell Taco kit with the EPNP and clover with the 215.VM2.K5 fluid in the shock and forks?

This is the SPI kit that i have in my 2010 450F. My local tuner that is at the tracks about every sunday has been working on dialing it in for me. He knows Dave Johnson and got this kit for me to go in my bike cause he said it would really help it a lot.

Yes, thats the kit. Im running 12 clicks on comp, and 10 on rebound. I went to 11 clicks for a session and it totally changed the entire bike, it magnified the small stuff. I had gold valves on my 06 and they hardly bottomed at all, so I think I'm going to try to add some oil and see where I stand.

Try the oil level adjustment, but note that 365 cc is the max recommended by Yamaha. Frankly, it may even act different with the reworked shock in place, too. Don't worry about calling him, he expects it, and he'd rather help you clear something up than fool around and be frustrated by it.

You think that the front would quit bottoming on harder hits when the shock gets done?

I know that the components work in sync, but how would that affect bottoming.

Under some circumstances, yes. Others obviously not. Impacts at the rear pitch the bike forward around the CG, adding to the load on the front. It's worth another try. Just don't be afraid of calling Dave in on it.

Under some circumstances, yes. Others obviously not. Impacts at the rear pitch the bike forward around the CG, adding to the load on the front. It's worth another try. Just don't be afraid of calling Dave in on it.

Gotcha, Im gonna put the shock on tomorrow afternoon and ride it this weekend. I'll be carrying extra oil to the track just to see how it feels, but I'm not expecting miracles.

Would it be possible to keep the stock shock spring (which feels just right) and bump the fork spring up one step and kind of go with a less aggressive valving set up and make the bike a little stiffer through the bottom of the stroke?

Would it be possible to keep the stock shock spring (which feels just right) and bump the fork spring up one step and kind of go with a less aggressive valving set up and make the bike a little stiffer through the bottom of the stroke?

I think so, but suspension is not my greatest area of expertise. You can quite possibly compensate for the heavier springs with the clickers, but I can only guess at how Dave set things up differently for you than the typical Dell Taco. It's also worth trying, because either way, 200 pounds in street clothes is a notch higher than the stock springs are "right" for.

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