HEADS UP!!!

Site upgrade in progress... Core site functions are working, but some non-critical features/functions will be temporarily unavailable while we work to restore them over the next couple of weeks.

Please post any bugs you encounter, but before you do, check to see if it's already listed.

Thanks for your patience while we work to improve the community.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
basketcase

Tool for adjusting DR650 rear shock preload?

16 posts in this topic

Is there a DIY way to adjust the rear shock pre-load on the DR650, or does one have to purchase a special tool from Suzuki or an aftermarket source to do the chore?

I am mulling the future options for upgrading the springs, but for now I would like to tinker with the pre-load and see how it acts.

Thanks in advance, :banana:

Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a long flat blade screwdriver to loosen the top/lock ring. Have a helper or use a jack to lift the bike up, just slightly. The weight of the bike should now be on the kickstand and front tire. Use both hands, grab the spring and turn it...the lower ring will turn as well. When you have made whatever adj. you like, set the bike down on the rear tire, tighten the top ring with the screwdriver, and you are done. The spring can usually be adjusted by hand in this manner, with the weight off the rear tire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to both of you. That is useful knowledge!

I looked up the preload settings in the service manual and the suggestion for the various settings show the spring pre-set length as:

- Softest = 253.5 mm (10.0 in)

- Standard = 247.5 mm (9.7 in)

- Stiffest = 238.5 mm (9.4 in)

Where exactly is this measurement taken?

From the bottom to the top of the spring only, or including the spacers/adapters?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just play around a bit.

I'm running 40mm or static sag and 80mm of race sag (7.6kg spring)

1 complete turn of the retainer ring=3mm at the rear axle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you grind the head of a large flat head screwdriver at an angle you will do less damage when hammering the top "locknut". You will be able to have more surface area in contact and won't create burrs which interfere with locking the "nut" back down properly. A over a full cm of contact vs a couple of mm. I bought a cheap large screwdriver, ground it down to the correct angle, and saved it as a specialized tool with the other bike stuff that is rapidly piling up. Got the advice from Rick at Cogent Dynamics...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or you could just buy the proper tool to do the job for $23 (at least with my Wilbers shock I have enough room in the frame):

pitposse_2094_55894240

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was going to make one of those, but I figured the angled driver was easier and guaranteed to fit in the tight space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Use a long flat blade screwdriver to loosen the top/lock ring. Have a helper or use a jack to lift the bike up, just slightly. The weight of the bike should now be on the kickstand and front tire. Use both hands, grab the spring and turn it...the lower ring will turn as well. When you have made whatever adj. you like, set the bike down on the rear tire, tighten the top ring with the screwdriver, and you are done. The spring can usually be adjusted by hand in this manner, with the weight off the rear tire.

+1 Before turning anything clean the threads on the shock and spray it down with WD40. Loosen the spring first to get the WD on the nut. I use a pair of leather gloves to turn the shock spring. You must make sure the rear wheel is off the ground so there is no more than adjuster tension on the spring. :banana:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to all for the assistance.

Re, the other question in post #4. What about the reference points for the measurement?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have often used a pair of 12" channel lock pliers to adjust the rings..you can pretty much adjust them to what size you need and they hold the teeth pretty well..no banging on the spring rings...when you wanna tighten..just turn em the other way...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks to all for the assistance.

Re, the other question in post #4. What about the reference points for the measurement?

it's the length of the spring only

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
it's the length of the spring only

Thanksl

Okay. So this afternoon I had a little time to tinker and used a large screwdriver to loosen the locking ring. I couldn't get a good enough angle or grip on it with gloves without taking the wheel off so I also used the screwdriver to move the adjustment ring.

The spring was set for the softest setting (10") and I moved it right at a half-inch. The difference in stiffness is notable. And the way the bike parks is an improvement.

Previously when I was seated on the bike and put the side stand down the side stand would touch the ground, meaning I had to absolutely have a hand on the bike to pull it left when dismounting. Parking on any kind of right incline was impossible.

Now, it has a half-inch or more of space between the tip of the side stand and the ground when I lower the stand.

To count revolutions of the adjustment ring I marked the outer edge of one of the lugs with a red marker so I could see it come around. Does anyone happen to know exactly how far one complete turn of the ring moves it on the threads? That could be useful knowledge for future tweaking.

Thanks again to all.

Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anybody got the stiffer spring from Kientech at all? My bike feels like a pogo stick, is it too much pre load or what. It's an 07 with 7500 miles on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The stiffer spring overpowers the damping.

Either do the quick (10w oil + 150psi nitrogen) fix or get it re-built with better valving.

Rick. 1 turn = 3mm ride height on the back end (where you should be measuring the difference this makes).

Aim for about 90mm drop from the fully extended measurement to with you sitting on it.

The ststic sag will be too small at this point but not much you can do until you get a spring suited for your weight on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0