Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
crf450319

Time to grease it up !

20 posts in this topic

Well, with any new (or not) bike I buy, I always pull them apart and re-grease the linkage/swingarm and steering stem bearings. I've found that new bikes don't have an over abundance of grease in any of the bearings, so to "fix" that I re-pack all of them. You know what they say, an ounce of prevention...

Kinda helps me get to know the new bike, and in this case the new brand as well.

IMG_0259.jpg

IMG_0260.jpg

IMG_0261.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hear you on this. I just pulled apart my new CRF450 linkage and steering stem and I found a light slathering of white grease on the steering races but the bearings were almost dry. The bearings in the linkage have some very light grease which looks almost like oil. The linkage bolts were dry. If you have a brand new bike I strongly suggest you take it apart before riding it and spend the time greasing these bearings to save a lot of hassle and expense later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just did my 2010. I hate those little needles you would think in this day and age they would have some fitting you can just squeeze grease right into a closed case bearing. Wonder who will be the first to come out with that. There was no grease on my bike a very small amount on the headset thats it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done this to every dirt bike I've ever had, I don't understand why the factories lube them better than they do ? I'm guessing there's a reason for it, I just haven't figured it out yet.

I had a buddy that bought a used bike a couple years ago, the guy he bought it from had never serviced the linkage in 2 years. It ended up costing my buddy almost $400 to have the old bearings pressed out and new ones put in, granted he could have saved himself some $$ if he'd done a little more of the work himself.

I bought my first MX bike (1991 CR 250R in '98) 12 years ago and a friend of mine showed me what should be done at least every season. Although I've done this every year to all of my bikes, and did my CRF 450R just before I sold it. I had 30 hours on that grease and one bearing was quite dry and another wasn't far behind. Funny because I hadn't been riding in the mud very often and I keep the pressure washer away from the linkage. I might start doing this half-way through the season as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just did my 2010. I hate those little needles you would think in this day and age they would have some fitting you can just squeeze grease right into a closed case bearing. Wonder who will be the first to come out with that. There was no grease on my bike a very small amount on the headset thats it.

when they first came out believe it or not, it was equipped with zerk fittings.

like the fork air bleeder valves, you wonder why they soon discontinued them?:thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a 50/50 mix of Bel-Ray grease and antiseeze. This is a superior moisture protective lube that lasts much longer that just grease. Up here in New England, water, mud and more water is the norm... water eventually breakes down grease alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

after less then 80 hours on my 06, all the bearings where 50% dry with little rust.:thumbsup: got on it right on time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Up here in New England, water, mud and more water is the norm... water eventually breakes down grease alone.
Not so with marine grade grease, such as for boat trailer wheel bearings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just tore apart a 2010 YZF. Almost bone dry! Tore apart another 2010. More lube on it than, well, insert your own ending.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never bothered with the bearings in the swingarm but those photos have me wondering if I should grease mine now...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've never bothered with the bearings in the swingarm but those photos have me wondering if I should grease mine now...

If you have to beat the swingarm pivot bolt out with a 5lb sledge, you will know you waited too long..... :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I greased the swingarm pivot bolt but I didn't pull the swingarm apart to hit the bearings inside there... or if I did I don't remember doing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I greased the swingarm pivot bolt but I didn't pull the swingarm apart to hit the bearings inside there... or if I did I don't remember doing it.

If you don't remember greasing it...it's time to tear it down again. It will save you future headaches..and having to use sledge hammers...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my pressure washer so, I end up tear down my bikes 4-5 times per season. Wheel bearings more often due to tire changes. My brand new bike is in a million pieces right now and I haven't even rode it yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tore down the 09 Tues. From start to finish it didnt take 2.5 hrs, and thats with me stopping, starting, having a sandwich.........

Mine has close to 100 hrs of ride time. It needed grease but it all came apart easily.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not so with marine grade grease, such as for boat trailer wheel bearings.

Thats what I use Gray but I remember you saying something about moly grease or grease with graphite. Is marine grade grease simply better for my wet NW conditions than moly or graphite????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Water resistance and moly content are two separate attributes. A Marine grease that contains moly is the ultimate.

Moly embeds itself in the surface of the bearing parts, and is effective to some degree even if all of the oily components of the grease dry up or wash out. Grease that won't repel water, or at least resist being washed out by water can't really be effective around a lot of water.

If you have to choose one over the other in a very wet environment, you'd want to go with water resistance over moly content.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've torn all my new bikes apart and re-lubed as well, but not until after the first ride. Just can't seem to wait. It's always harder to re-grease this way because you have to clean everything but I've accepted it. One interesting note - they were always well lubed. The last bikes I did were a YZ250 and a CRF450. The YZ took some effort to push the swingarm bolt out (even after only one ride) but the CRF pushed out with just finger pressure. Both were well greased. Despite the luck, I will continue to tear apart new bikes and re-grease - but not until after the first ride!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Water resistance and moly content are two separate attributes. A Marine grease that contains moly is the ultimate.

Moly embeds itself in the surface of the bearing parts, and is effective to some degree even if all of the oily components of the grease dry up or wash out. Grease that won't repel water, or at least resist being washed out by water can't really be effective around a lot of water.

If you have to choose one over the other in a very wet environment, you'd want to go with water resistance over moly content.

Thanks thats what I thought:thumbsup: What about mixing the two 50/50??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0