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mdenhaan

I need tips for 06 YZ450F

13 posts in this topic

Hi guys,

I'm a newbie and could use some advice. Just got back into riding after 20 years away and bought a mint condition 06 YZ450F. Any tips on this particular bike as far a maintanence or issues that have come up with this year and model so I know what to look for. Don't know much about it, but it's fast, runs like a top and seems like a great bike.

Big Mike

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There really aren't any major issues to tend to with these bikes. The biggest complaint is that the front end does NOT like to stick, which most address by swapping out the front tire and/or revalving the suspension. Did you get the manual with it? That will be the biggest help on maintenance. One thing to note is that there are 2 bolts to remove the drain the oil, one on the left side of the motor and one on the bottom of the motor.

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  • Unless you know it was already done, open up the steering head and suspension linkage and clean it up and grease it. Replace the upper steering head bearing with PN 93332-00078-00
  • The steering head upper seal is not very good at sealing, which is why the bearing was revised. Avoid high pressure water in this area, and be sure to use a grease rated for marine use.
  • If the bike still has the OEM chain on it, discard it immediately. My second '06 was bought used with two rides on it, so the sprockets were still OK. I installed a new Regina ORN6 and those same sprockets are still on the bike today. If you leave OEM chain in place, you will need to adjust it every ride, and it will destroy the sprockets in less than 6 months.
  • The cam chain and tensioner should be replaced at least annually, and it's a good idea to inspect the chain for kinking and binding links a couple of times a year.
  • Clean and oil the air filter every ride unless you live in some kind of idyllic, dust free area.
  • If you use a good, proven durable oil designed specifically for use in a motorcycle that shares its engine oil with the transmission, change the oil at least every 8 hours (3 ride days, more or less). If you use even a premium automotive oil, change every ride day until you've done a used oil analysis that shows it is staying at its rated viscosity longer than that. Change the oil filter at least each 8 hours.
  • Browse: http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=447989

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good stuff Grey....

Also most of us found the stock handlebars were way way too low and made the bike harder to ride, steer or anything. For me Windham bend Twinwall Renthals made a world of difference. A lot of us swapped the seat for a SDG tall to get rid of the camel back riding position and make the rider position much more flatter to sit on and move on. Wider pegs help also

IMHO the 06 has had the best motor, best power and most linear powerband of all the YZF 450s and was the only year Yellow plastic came on it(in the past 10yrs) - the best looking bike of all of them:smirk::cheers::smirk:

Search in this forum on 06 and or 06 turning and you should find enough material to keep you and your wallet busy for the next several months. The bikes only shortcoming was the turning and it was not that bad either, compared to the 99-05 editions. I made mine turn as good as it ever will eventually.

Have fun the 06 was and still is a great bike :moon:

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IMHO the 06 has had the best motor, best power and most linear powerband of all the YZF 450s and was the only year Yellow plastic came on it(in the past 10yrs) - the best looking bike of all of them:smirk::smirk::smirk:

Obviously an unbiased opinion :moon::cheers::smirk:

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Hi guys,

Thanks for the feedback. That's great input. I'm still working my way through the bike, but so far I'm really pleased. It's incredibly fast when it hits the mid range of the power band and is more bike then I will ever need. Thumper talk has been a great source of info even though I'm only scratching the surface. Seems like there is a lot of experienced riders and tuners on this website. Keep the tips coming, I'll be reading them.

Big Mike (mdenhaan)

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Yamaha four-strokes are as reliable as an anvil if the oil and filter are changed regularly with good MOTORYCYCLE-SPECIFIC oil and quality filters. Keep the air filter clean also, and you will be set for years of trouble-free service.

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Gray you say to replace the cam chain tensioner annually also? I replaced the chain at 2yr mark maybe I better look at tensioner also thanks.

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I have a 06 also and it has(I believe roughly)the last time I checked the hour meter.......190 or so hours on it.....maybe 198.

Any ways I have always used Amsoil in it and have always raced it in mx(30+B and 35+ and changed the oil every 1 hour and a half. This may have been to short intervals but "hey" I never had to replace the cam chain nor put more than one set of rings and piston in.

Only adjusted the valves in it once and it still runs great. I have retired it now as I'm waiting patiently for my 2010 model 450 to arrive.

The 06 has with stood alot of riding time but i allways cleaned the air filter after(or replaced it) after each and every ride. also done regular maintence to all the bearings in the swingarm and linkage arm and steering.

You got a reliable bike my friend with standard up keep it will last a long time.:moon:

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  • Unless you know it was already done, open up the steering head and suspension linkage and clean it up and grease it. Replace the upper steering head bearing with PN 93332-00078-00
  • The steering head upper seal is not very good at sealing, which is why the bearing was revised. Avoid high pressure water in this area, and be sure to use a grease rated for marine use.
  • If the bike still has the OEM chain on it, discard it immediately. My second '06 was bought used with two rides on it, so the sprockets were still OK. I installed a new Regina ORN6 and those same sprockets are still on the bike today. If you leave OEM chain in place, you will need to adjust it every ride, and it will destroy the sprockets in less than 6 months.
  • The cam chain and tensioner should be replaced at least annually, and it's a good idea to inspect the chain for kinking and binding links a couple of times a year.
  • Clean and oil the air filter every ride unless you live in some kind of idyllic, dust free area.
  • If you use a good, proven durable oil designed specifically for use in a motorcycle that shares its engine oil with the transmission, change the oil at least every 8 hours (3 ride days, more or less). If you use even a premium automotive oil, change every ride day until you've done a used oil analysis that shows it is staying at its rated viscosity longer than that. Change the oil filter at least each 8 hours.
  • Browse: http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=447989

Hi Gray,

Do you know off hand how many links that chain has for the 06 YZ450F. I want to order a chain and am used to mountian bikes where they all have the same amount of links and you use a tool to bust the chain to fit your bicycle. It looks like you need to know how many links your bike has when you order.

Thanks,

Big Mike

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You can do the same thing with a motorcycle, too, just by buying a 120. But since you can order one to fit, why not?

They use a 114. That info is in the manual. If you don't have one....:

http://www.yamaha-motor-europe.com/community/service/manuals.jsp

Thanks so much. I bought the manual which is pretty comprehensive, just havent had time to dig into the detail. Just did my first oil change so starting with baby steps.

I appreciate the feedback.

Big Mike

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