Quick Change Front Sprocket

Does anybody know of a quick change front sprocket for the Yamaha? The bent-washer-tab-over-the-countershaft-nut is really tedious. The Suzuki and Honda system is much easier.

It may be tedious, but it is secure. Why do you need to change front sprockets any quicker?

I go back and forth between street and dirt which means changing the wheel set, chain, and front sprocket.

Ah, I see. I have not seen anything but that big ol' bent over washer. Maybe some have done it with a twist wire.....but that's just as time consuming.

the honda 2 bolt & plate method is quicker but

and it's a BIG BUT - it allows the sprocket to rattle around and hammer

back and forth on the splines - eventually wearing the splines off counter shaft

check out this http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=832355&highlight=weld+sprocket

not a nice thing to find - changing the sprocket nut and folded tab is a way better method

splitting the cases to change countershaft sucks

I dont see how it is tedious

Changing these at work usually take under 5mins. I much prefer the yamaha system to the honda or suzuki :moon:

How do you hold the counter-shaft sprocket while torquing the nut?

the honda 2 bolt & plate method is quicker but

and it's a BIG BUT - it allows the sprocket to rattle around and hammer

back and forth on the splines - eventually wearing the splines off counter shaft

Better living by design, eh? It needs to be noted that a key difference is that the YZF left side trans shaft bearings receive oil under pressure from the oil pump, and the front sprocket has to be tight to prevent a leak.
I dont see how it is tedious

Changing these at work usually take under 5mins. I much prefer the yamaha system to the honda or suzuki :moon:

As far as working on them, I have no preference, but the YZ setup is technically superior for the reasons stated above. Even using hand tools, it doesn't take long to do.
How do you hold the counter-shaft sprocket while torquing the nut?
Mostly, I use an air impact wrench and hold it by hand (or with the chain). If you don't have an impact, or can't use one in the field, leave the chain on before removing, or install it before torquing, and place a piece of wood or similar through the rear wheel across the wsing arm, as close to the rim as possible.
How do you hold the counter-shaft sprocket while torquing the nut?

I sit on the bike and apply pressure to the break pedal with your foot as usual. Put 3ft cheater on the socket wrench!:moon::cheers:

As stated, you'll want to keep the nut and lock washer on there since the shaft, bearing, spacing collar, and sealing O-ring behind the sprocket are supposed to be held together with tension.

If you have the tools needed to remove the nut and put the tranny in 1st gear and step on the rear brake pedal, there is no problem doing this job.

If you don't have the tools, buy them.

If not, count on busted knuckles and a nut that either won't come off or one not put back on at the proper torque.

Have a new lock washer on hand and use it. :moon:

If you have the tools needed to remove the nut and put the tranny in 1st gear and step on the rear brake pedal, there is no problem doing this job.

If you don't have the tools, buy them.

If not, count on busted knuckles and a nut that either won't come off or one not put back on at the proper torque.

Have a new lock washer on hand and use it. :moon:

You have it backwards, put the tranny in 5th gear so the brake will hold it back. First gear gives the mechanical advantage to the transmission, not the brake.

What do you use to bend the washer? I can never get a very tight bend like it came from the factory. You guys using a drop of blue locktite on there as well?

Yeah, I looking to do the same thing with my wr. I do some DS-ing and come acrossed some nasty ST and need to gear down. Having a quick change method would help out. Right now I just dont bend the washer completely over, but the nut has come lose on me.

There's got to be a better way.

You have it backwards,
Nope, you do. In the first place, if you use my method, you don't need to put it in gear or use the brake, but if you're going to ignore that, remember that you're not taking the flywheel off, you're turning the output shaft. It will do next to nothing to help you either way, but think, is it harder for the output shaft to turn the engine in 5th gear or first?
Nope, you do. In the first place, if you use my method, you don't need to put it in gear or use the brake, but if you're going to ignore that, remember that you're not taking the flywheel off, you're turning the output shaft. It will do next to nothing to help you either way, but think, is it harder for the output shaft to turn the engine in 5th gear or first?

OK, but you use 5th gear when trying to hold back the flywheel right.

Edited by MaddogYZ

That would be correct. But with WR450's the flywheel has an exposed hex or a set of flats on it. A wrench can be placed on these, and the flywheel held that way much more effectively.

For what it's worth, I've had my honda bolt and spring washer fall off while riding and I didn't notice it until back at the truck... I was very thankful not to have a catastrophic failure....

Ive run with and without a lock washer and its never come loose. I do mark it tho and every now and then have a peek to see if it has moved or not.

Run a open case saver and keep a big socket on hand and its 1 2 3...

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