Thinking of trading/selling in the 06..

I've been giving thought lately to trading or selling my 06 YZ450F SE away towards an 08/09 WR450....

I love how my YZ is light, flickable, and the power is...ballistic. My buddies on CRF's and WR's cant keep up in the whoops.

I rode a buddy's 05 WR and I loved the gearing..The weight was noticeable, but not bad.

I want to be able to do nightrides, but I can get a battery powered HID from bajadesigns that will run 3-4 hours.

What about an external lighting stator? I've seen ricky stator eline ones, but nothing for an 06+

What are your suggestions?

By the way, the YZ is paid for. I'd have to finance 2-3k for the WR.

I would keep the 06 and switch the tranny, if your mechanicaly inclined, to the WR gearing and add the baja designs light. You would spend less but if your 06 is going to need a rebuild anytime soon and you dont mind spending the 2 to 3 grand, the extra weight and suspension work then get the WR.

I would keep the 06 and switch the tranny, if your mechanicaly inclined, to the WR gearing and add the baja designs light. You would spend less but if your 06 is going to need a rebuild anytime soon and you dont mind spending the 2 to 3 grand, the extra weight and suspension work then get the WR.

My thoughts exactly, this is what I'm going to do with my 06YZ. Switching to a WR trans and battery operated light. Just dont have the money for a newer WR.:banghead:

I'd keep the YZ and modify it, you can get lights and WR gears for probably 1/2 of what it would cost you to buy a WR.

I'd keep the YZ and modify it, you can get lights and WR gears for probably 1/2 of what it would cost you to buy a WR.

Swaping the trans is about $500 in parts right?

Who makes the stator for lights? e-line? You have to get a battery and an AC to DC converter as I recall.

The cost difference between an aluminum frame WR and YZ is $1000 - $1500... So it seams like it would be a wash...

I would learn to use the search tool since therea re at least 1,000 threads on hear detailing lighting options for that bike and telling you what a pain in the a$$ it is to change the transmission.

I would learn to use the search tool since therea re at least 1,000 threads on hear detailing lighting options for that bike and telling you what a pain in the a$$ it is to change the transmission.

Splittng the cases is not a pain, just time consuming and opens the door for reliability issues. I have never liked tearing into a perfectly good motor.

Thanks for the search advise

Swaping the trans is about $500 in parts right?

Who makes the stator for lights? e-line? You have to get a battery and an AC to DC converter as I recall.

The cost difference between an aluminum frame WR and YZ is $1000 - $1500... So it seams like it would be a wash...

I thought the trans swap was more like $300 in parts, and the lighting can be done for another $300-500 I believe, but it's been a while since I read up on any of it.

Darryl at cyclopsmotorsports.com set me up with an 8" HID and batteries that will go four hours. If you need more runtime it is simply a matter of having an extra battery with you. I also run a helmet light for backup.

I've changed my mind. I just want lights. I'm looking into stators and batteries. I love my yellow YZ too much to let it go!

I run the Baja Designs Diablo light with the battery setup on my '01 426 and it's great! It is possible to outride the light, but you need to be going well over 50+. For the local Southern Nevada night races, it works well as the pattern is nice and wide, while the beam carries well out front. It works best with a nice beam helmet light (Cyclops) to see further out, around corners, and down into whoops. I was looking at a WR as well, but now that I have the light, I am in the market for a newer YZ. :banghead:

I run the Baja Designs Diablo light with the battery setup on my '01 426 and it's great! It is possible to outride the light, but you need to be going well over 50+. For the local Southern Nevada night races, it works well as the pattern is nice and wide, while the beam carries well out front. It works best with a nice beam helmet light (Cyclops) to see further out, around corners, and down into whoops. I was looking at a WR as well, but now that I have the light, I am in the market for a newer YZ. :banghead:

Where did you mount the battery? Airbox? Do you have pictures? Did you fabricate a bracket or was it made by someone?

Where did you mount the battery? Airbox? Do you have pictures? Did you fabricate a bracket or was it made by someone?
If I'm not mistaken, the Diablo mounts the entire complete system on the headlight bracket, including the battery.
If I'm not mistaken, the Diablo mounts the entire complete system on the headlight bracket, including the battery.

So then all one would need to do is provide AC to the rectifier, and you're good to go, right? Would the pro racing 50w stator provide enough power?

Where would you put an inline fuse, before or after the rectifier?

Again, if I'm correct, the Diablo is intended as a constant loss system, not connected to a charging circuit.

However, there should be no reason you couldn't connect it to one. Remember not to ground any portion of the DC side to the chassis. You would need a rectifier and a regulator. The fuse can be anywhere in the circuit that would be subjected to an overload and capable of interrupting current. Remember that your concern is primarily a short from the source to ground, bypassing any load, so the fuse should be placed close to the source. Probably one between the battery and switch, and another on the DC lead out of the rectifier.

Looking at BD's website, it says the kickstart version of the Diablo has a small nicad battery and a rectifier mounted to the back. Do I need my own battery, wont the Diablo one do what I need? Just trying to power a headlight, and the TT Vapor.

I was going to isolate the chassis from the negative side of my circuit. I wouldnt want 50W of power using the chassis as a ground conductor.

(I'm an electrician, when it comes to AC, I can tell you this and that, but when it's DC, i'm like a deer in the headlights)

The Diablo doesn't strictly need an additional battery at all. It runs itself, and is supposed to last something like 3 hours on a charge. Adding an additional battery, or a charging system, even an only partially adequate one, would extend that time.

AC and DC are no different as far as the rules of running circuitry. Both need a closed path from the source to the load and back. The trouble starts when they get mixed together. A battery MUST have DC voltage delivered to it. DCV+ in excess of battery voltage applied to the battery positive will charge it. ANY DCV- applied at the battery positive will discharge it. Solid state electronics all operate on DC. Devices intended to draw power from an AC source will always have their own internal rectifiers to deal with this, so things like your CDI and your desktop computer are already set up for it.

Visualize two circuits; one consisting of an AC magneto connected to some load or other, and the other consisting of a battery and a load. If we were to ground the battery negative (or positive, it matters not) to something like the chassis frame, and then use the same frame as a common lead for one side of the AC circuit, what happens? The AC voltage will switch polarities at whatever the cyclic rate is. That's OK as long as the voltage is V-, but as soon as you have V+ on the battery's negative side, you have a problem with opposing voltages. The two have to be electrically separated, and cannot share a common lead, ground, or buss.

Motor vehicles are different from most other electrical devices, and certainly from buildings. They typically use the chassis as a "ground". This is a sort of a misnomer from the standpoint of an AC electrician, because in your world, grounds go to the Earth, and only in the case of some malfunction should anything ever flow through them. Chassis grounds on a motor vehicle are really more analogous to the common lead in an AC circuit; a shared return path to the source, or a common buss, if you want to look at it that way.

This became common practice a very long time ago, and 60 years ago, when the charging systems were DC, there was never a problem. When AC generators (alternators) came into use in the early sixties, the AC portion of the system was, and still is, pretty much limited to the alternator itself. Keeping AC out of the rest of the DC system was taken care of by floating the whole AC circuit within the unit.

So what has to be done here is essentially the reverse of what's done in every car on the road already. In a car, or a street bike, the bulk of the electrical system is DC and uses a chassis ground, so the AC has to be kept clear of the chassis. With a bike like the YZ, the whole base electrical system is AC, and the chassis is used as a common buss, so anything DC has to be kept off the frame. As we saw earlier, the CDI is already built to deal with that, and avoids problems by having its entire internal DC circuit isolated, or "floated".

Where did you mount the battery? Airbox? Do you have pictures? Did you fabricate a bracket or was it made by someone?

On my '08 I cut a piece of rubber from an old HD innertube and screwed it to the underside of my seat. Then I just slip the batteries between the piece of rubber and the bottom of the seat. They sit in there nice and tight...works great.

Gray, is there anything you don't know? Your explanation made perfect sense. Most of it I had already known. Thanks.

Gray, is there anything you don't know?
Oh, sure, lots of stuff. Some of it I don't even know that I don't know it.

The last human who could have known everything there was to know would have had to have lived before 650 AD.

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