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Wrfrk

Another setting sag ?? help

4 posts in this topic

Ok so I recently installed new springs (for my weight) on my 07 WR450. Now since having done that a month or so ago, I feel like I've broke in the rear spring and I want to get the sag set right.

I'm used to doing this on KTM's and working on the WR is a major PITA so I'm looking for the easiest way to accomplish this. First however, I need to know where my rider sag numbers really need to be. The manual states between 90-100mm but I've read here between 100-110mm. I've also read in much more simplistic terms, it needs to be at or very close to 4" and around 1" static. So which is best? And what's the limit for preload on that spring?

Then, what's the easiest way to turn those fing collars on this bike. There is no way to get the proper tool in there to crank on those without pulling the whole back end down. So the only option is to pound on the collars with a screwdriver but that is going to trash them. What's the best way you that have worked on these bikes have found to do this?

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I run 100mm rider which gives me 25mm static. I like a little softer rear spring than some for traction and suppleness in roots and rocks.

Just knock the top collar loose with a hammer and punch, then grip the spring with both hands and start turning. The bottom collar will turn with the spring. Then just use the punch to tighten the top collar again. Easy to get at it all without removing anything.

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If you have the correct spring for your weight then the static setting will be correct on it's own. Meaning: if you have a spring that is too soft for your weight then you'll need to turn the adjuster way down to achieve the proper "race sag ". Then when you get off the bike you will not have any or close to no static sag. If the spring is too stiff for your weight, the opposite will happen. Set preload for proper race sag, get off and then there will be too much static sag.Just as tribalbc mentioned, put the bike on a stand and the collar should spin when you turn the spring.

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Ok so I recently installed new springs (for my weight) on my 07 WR450. Now since having done that a month or so ago, I feel like I've broke in the rear spring and I want to get the sag set right.

I'm used to doing this on KTM's and working on the WR is a major PITA so I'm looking for the easiest way to accomplish this. First however, I need to know where my rider sag numbers really need to be. The manual states between 90-100mm but I've read here between 100-110mm. I've also read in much more simplistic terms, it needs to be at or very close to 4" and around 1" static. So which is best? And what's the limit for preload on that spring?

Then, what's the easiest way to turn those fing collars on this bike. There is no way to get the proper tool in there to crank on those without pulling the whole back end down. So the only option is to pound on the collars with a screwdriver but that is going to trash them. What's the best way you that have worked on these bikes have found to do this?

"Best" is what works best for you. Start with the 4" / 1" and ride the bike. Get to know the suspension settings, and get them set best for your favorite terrain. If you find the bike turns too slow or too quick, you can help alter this by decreasing / increasing rear sag. You can't fine tune it until you get used to what you have, so you can evaluate the changes made.

Loosen the top collar with an old tire iron (perfect bend) and a sledge hammer, with the bike on a stand. Turn the spring with your hands (gloves) to change tension.

You should be able to make 10-20mm sag changes in about 5 minutes. I went riding once with the top collar still loose, and adjusted spring tension while out in the middle of the ride. It really helped me to see what spring tension did to the suspension and the handling.

Your goal is the balance between static sag and race sag with the spring for your weight. If you can't get the balance, you need to change the spring. Too little static sag means you need a stiffer spring, and vice versa.

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