Valve adjustment on the new wrf

Hello and sorry if that is a very newbie question but i'm planning into getting a new wr450f and i am now trying to learn the basics i'll have to do!

I have just an answer,in adjusting the valves i've seen many articles and videos that show that you just have to replace the shims!The problem is that the manual doesnt say anything about shims,at least in the last model and i am just thinking are there some other types of valves that the new wrf uses or something else is wrong?

Thank you! :ride:

They call them "pads" in the manuel

I wouldn't worry about the valve shimming until such time as the bike needs it. Why worry about something you are only going to do once every 3 or 4 years (if that).

On the other hand, checking the valves is a skill you will want to learn how to do as you will do that more often.

Ok thanks a lot!

You are right,it's just i thought ill need to do that more often and that i think that checking them is easy!

Yamaha provides the tools you need when you buy the bike,right?

1) Get a feeler gage what has blades in very small increments. You want to know exactly the clearance, not that it is 'just someplace in spec'.

2) Measure the clearances of your new bike. This will be your baseline.

3)Every 20 hours (or more) of runtime (get a hour meter for your new bike), recheck the valves. Once they start to tighten up, plan on getting a valve job soon.

4) The tools supplied are minimal. Plug wrench, spoke wrench, maybe a needle removal tool. The rest are up to you.

1) Get a feeler gage what has blades in very small increments. You want to know exactly the clearance, not that it is 'just someplace in spec'.

2) Measure the clearances of your new bike. This will be your baseline.

3)Every 20 hours (or more) of runtime (get a hour meter for your new bike), recheck the valves. Once they start to tighten up, plan on getting a valve job soon.

4) The tools supplied are minimal. Plug wrench, spoke wrench, maybe a needle removal tool. The rest are up to you.

I believe they are now down to just supplying a plug wrench. :ride:

1) Get a feeler gage what has blades in very small increments. You want to know exactly the clearance, not that it is 'just someplace in spec'.

2) Measure the clearances of your new bike. This will be your baseline.

3)Every 20 hours (or more) of runtime (get a hour meter for your new bike), recheck the valves. Once they start to tighten up, plan on getting a valve job soon.

4) The tools supplied are minimal. Plug wrench, spoke wrench, maybe a needle removal tool. The rest are up to you.

5) Learn some new swear words when you go to put the valve cover back on. When you do get it, make sure you make a mental note on how you are doing it. :ride:

IDK, I never have a problem. You have to move it this and then that way and out it comes.

IDK, I never have a problem. You have to move it this and then that way and out it comes.

And reverse it to go in. No room for any other way.:ride:

And reverse it to go in. No room for any other way.:)

Exactly! :ride:

That's all it takes???damn - I've been plasma cutting and re-welding the frame above the head cover every time I check my valves.... :ride::):lol::)

It just takes one quick prayer to the Yamaha gods,..... and my 12yr old with small hands :ride:

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