Shredded

<font color="navy">I went riding this past weekend :) and it turned into a nightmare, kind of...

Started out with a 3 hour ride Saturday morning came back and relaxed. Got ready to go on the big single track ride of the weekend and took off. About 15 miles from camp my 426 locked up and almost threw me over the handle bars. At first I thought it was something in the trans then I looked down. My chain was off the countershaft sprocket. Then I proceeded to look back, inspecting my bike for damage and rear hub was all torn apart!!!

I recently put new chain/sprockets on but went with a steel rear sprocket for the longevity. What I think happened was a rock (it was rocky) got caught between my chain and sprocket, instead of the sprocket bending/breaking the steel sprocket actually twisted off the aluminum hub, taking with it the chain guide. Real bummer.

Yesturday, I ordered all new parts and it will cost about $275 for everything. New hub, chain/sprockets, chain guide, sprocket bolts, dust seals (rear wheel ), and some misc. stuff.

I will be going riding again this weekend as long as my parts get here soon enough. The hard part will be lacing & truing the spokes/wheel. Has anyone done this before on the 00' 426? My Dad has a little experience but any advice will help the process. Thanks

And Yes, I got an aluminum sprocket this time.

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~~~~~YaMaHaFoUrTwOsIx~~~~~

First you pissed off the electronic gods (how many micro's must you kill!), now it looks like you've got the mechanical gods mad too!

Teamtoxic

I know a couple guys that have had the same thing happen to their rear hubs...I saw one of them! Broke the spocket flang in half..very ugly. Anyway, one of the guys has had it happen TWICE (on a 99 and an 01). I think his buddies was a 01 as well. He went to his dealer and had Yamaha warranty it for him. They paid for the hub, but he had to pay labor to have it laced. You might want to check it out with your dealer. Just a thought...good luck!

MGR8

freaky....bad luck...bet that'll never happen again though....you've paid your dues

<font color="navy">YZmann, I know, I've pissed off the electronic gods. Many times. Damn those microcomputers! However, that last one was my Dad's fault :) You're the one that convinced me to buy the Yamaha! So you are the one that (indirectly) pissed off the mechanical gods. I hear you're now racing pro in France or something? #68 lol

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Alright guys, back to my story. Its Wednesday night. I came home today and my parts were here. I started w

Another one blows the hub

Another one blows the hub

And another one

And another one

Another one blows the hub

TT, I know your pain from personal experience. I blew up my '00 hub. Were all of your sprocket bolts still attached and tight?

Relacing the wheel is easy. Before you disassemble the hub, measure the offset from the rotor flange to the rim. Take many measurements and average them, then true the new hub to that offset.

Be sure to loctite the sprocket bolts/nuts.

<font color="navy">I had some problems posting last night and my post was cut off short. I had to re-register, for some reason my username wasn't registered anymore. Here's what TRIED to say....

YZmann, I know, I've pissed off the electronic gods. Many times. Damn those microcomputers! However, that last one was my Dad's fault You're the one that convinced me to buy the Yamaha! So you are the one that (indirectly) pissed off the mechanical gods. I hear you're now racing pro in France or something? #68 lol

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Alright guys, back to my story. Its Wednesday night. I came home today and my parts were here. I started working on my bike at 3:30 and was done by 7:00. Lacing the wheel was relatively simple. It took about an hour to lace the wheel. An hour to true the wheel and its virtually perfect. And about 1 1/2 hours to put on the tire, chain/sprockets, and some misc. stuff. It wasn't anywhere near as hard as I thought it would be. It set me back about $275.

I wouldn't reccomend running steel sprockets. I think if I was running an aluminum sprocket, the outcome would have been much different.

Scott, all my sprocket bolts were tight and Loc-Tited on. I always use Loc-Tite on important bolts like that. Also, I did not BLOW out the hub, I tore the whole damn thing apart! :) maybe its all that torque.

Ride Hard

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~YaMaHaYzFoUrTwOsIx~

On my hub, the sprocket flange blew apart in large chunks. There was a lot of related damage. :)

Whether you picked up a rock or other object, or the hub fatigued (which is what I think happened), I don't think that an aluminum sprocket would have saved anything. The ears on the hub will break off before those bolts would ever rip through the sprocket. But aluminum does give it a hi-tech look, though it will be interesting to see how is holds up.

PS: The new microchip is in the mail. Remember it runs on 5vdc, not 110 ac. Once you let the magic smoke out, you can never get it back in! :)

I had something simular happen. I was blitzing thru some whoops and the scoot locked up on me. Only I had proof that a rock lodged between the countershaft sprocket and chain. It was still there as I drug the bike off the track (I was thrown out of the whoops luckily, but the bike was wasted)

This link shows a crude but effective way to put your wheel back together. http://www.eagle-racing.com/chassis.htm

[This message has been edited by MrMXer (edited 06-24-2001).]

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