Got my jet kit and AIS removal should be here today

Ok, I got my JD Jet kit... my AIS removal kit should arrive today...

I'm not all that worried about the AIS removal.. it looks straight forward...

But when it comes to carbs, I'm a rookie :ride:

I'm assuming that the JD Kit comes with all the jets I need (I hope and it should for $75 bucks)

The guide in the stickies is for a 2004...

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=309069

how much different is it going to be for a 2009?

how much different is it going to be for a 2009?

The actual jetting of the carb...NONE

The only difference is how HARD it is to get the carb out :ride:

I just went through the entire jetting database and not a single person from ohio has a post in it.... ugh....

I know my elevation is 500-1500 feet above sea level...

I am doing the gray wire, AIS removal, removing the airbox lid and removing the pea shooter in the baffle...

By looking at other posts from people who ride in about the same elevation...

I am thinking of 168 Main, 48 Pilot, 40 Leak, JD Red needle 5th clip, fuel screw about 1.5 turns......

Can anyone confirm or give me some opinion on this setup?

Can anyone confirm or give me some opinion on this setup?

Just follow Indy's suggestions in this post and you will be good to go

whats an ACV circuit

The ACV is a coast enricher, designed to add fuel when you close the throttle to reduce backfiring. I suggest leaving it alone unless you have a good reason to mess with it.

When you install the jet kit, follow JD's instructions exactly. Take your time. If you pull the carb, place it on a clean towel on your bench. Work gently and intelligently. Do one thing at at a time.

You'll be fine.

The ACV ios a coast enricher, designed to add fuel when you close the throttle to reduce backfireing. I suggest leaving it alone unless you have a good reason to mess with it.

When you install the jet kit, follow JD's instructions exactly. Take your time. If you pull the carb, place it on a clean towel on your bench. Work gently and intelligently. Do one thing at at a time.

You'll be fine.

So you're saying I shouldn't be drinking while doing this?

So you're saying I shouldn't be drinking while doing this?

Bite your tounge! I never, ever said that. A smart man knows to maintain his precious bodily fluids.

Bite your tounge! I never, ever said that. A smart man knows to maintain his precious bodily fluids.

good, because I don't think I ever enter the garage with out a beer in my hand :ride:

ok... i think i've cut every zip tie, removed the exhaust and removed a million screws and i can't get the sub frame off...

the airbox is like connected to the carb... how do i disconnect that to remove the subframe?.....

Did you loosen the clamping band around the airboot joint?

i dont see a clamp holding the boot to the airbox

i dont see a clamp holding the boot to the airbox

I think he meant the clamp holding the airboot to the rear of the carb. When I took my WR apart two years ago I didn't fully remove the subframe, it was too much work. What I did was remove all the bolts holding it down, loosened the clamp that holds it to the carb, and just moved/lifted it out of the way so I could remove the top bolt/nut for the rear shock. The biggest part is removing that shock. There were just too many wires tangled up with the subframe and the coolant overflow hose as well.

how do you even get to the clamp holding the airboot to the carb...

the frame is in the way...

i can barely even see the carb

how do you even get to the clamp holding the airboot to the carb...

the frame is in the way...

i can barely even see the carb

It's not that hard to get to it. All you need is the appropriate size t-handle and use the long side. You can see the clamp and screw on the left side of the bike, same side as the choke on the carb. The clamp holding the front of the carb uses a different size bolt, so you'll need two different t-handles or allen wrenches to loosen up the carb. The frame seems like it gets in the way, but it leaves just enough space for the t-handle or long allen wrench to get at the clamp bolt.

Here's a picture showing the locations of the screws. Hope it helps. On the picture you can see that the airbox is still somewhat attached to the bike, it just looks like it was swung up behind the bike to move it out of the way, that's all you need to do with the subframe in order to remove the rear shock. I'll just say that you don't need to completely remove the carb from the bike to do the mods/re-jet. In fact, I'd advise against it, it will save you the work of messing with the hot-start and throttle cables. All you really need is to clear the way to turn the carb enough to get to the bottom of it for the jets to get installed. You'll need to remove the bowl to change the leak jet, but it's not hard once the carb is loosened up and turned on its side. To change the needle you'll need to remove the top engine mounts above the carb, and you'll need some needle-nose pliers to pull the needle out. Resist the urge to twist the throttle when the top carb cover is removed when taking out the needle, the carb slide can get stuck if you do that. To do the AP o-ring mod just remove the plastic cover on top of the throttle cables. Let me know if you need any other pointers.

side.jpg

ok.. i got it off.... i just didnt see the little allen screw cuz the pink hoses were hiding it....

do i need to take the shock off... looks like i need to unbolt the shock to get the carb out...

yes, the shock must come off. I recommend removing the rear wheel to do this, it will make it easier to move the swing arm up and down when removing the shock from the frame and linkage. Try not to remove the carb completely off if you haven't removed the hot start and throttle cables, save yourself some work.

ok, i got the shock off and the carb is disconnected from the engine... its just hanging by the cables.... if you say I can change all the jets while its just dangling there I will give that a try....

I ended up switching jobs... and decided to remove the AIS.. (must be my ADD)

anyway.... i couldnt get to the one allen screw with the radiator hose connected.... i disconnected and dumped about a quart of radiator fluid all over my garage.... ewww...... but i got the stop off plate on there....

was i suppose to put that metal gasket underneath the stop plate?

anyway.. the baby woke up from her nap... i'll probably start on the carb around 6:30pm after the wife comes home..... so everyone just sit in front of their computers and await my questions

ok, i got the shock off and the carb is disconnected from the engine... its just hanging by the cables.... if you say I can change all the jets while its just dangling there I will give that a try....

I ended up switching jobs... and decided to remove the AIS.. (must be my ADD)

anyway.... i couldnt get to the one allen screw with the radiator hose connected.... i disconnected and dumped about a quart of radiator fluid all over my garage.... ewww...... but i got the stop off plate on there....

was i suppose to put that metal gasket underneath the stop plate?

anyway.. the baby woke up from her nap... i'll probably start on the carb around 6:30pm after the wife comes home..... so everyone just sit in front of their computers and await my questions

Yes, it is in fact possible to change the jets with the carb just hanging there by the cables, trust me, I did it. All you need is for the carb to be able to turn so you can remove the bowl screws and get to the jets. In fact, if you weren't going to change the leak jet, you wouldn't even need to remove the bowl, just the drain screw. Then you'll need to remove the carb top cover to get to the needle. After that you'll need to remove the black plastic cover on top of the throttle cables so you can install a couple of tiny o-rings on the AP arm. Some thin needle-nose pliers will come in handy for that.

If they provided you with a metal gasket for the AIS block-off plate then use it. Otherwise you'll end up with an exhaust leak and it will defeat the purpose of blocking it off in the first place.

Take your time with this, don't rush, or you'll probably end up having to re-do some things. With the amount of work that goes into this, the last thing you want to do is have to tear the bike apart again because you missed a little detail.

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