simple yes or no question on chain slack

Is 1 3/4 inches ok for the chain slack.

Kind of depends on what kind of riding your doing, if you hitting big jumps I'd get more. For woods that will work. Is the chain new? If it is it will stretch throughout ride time.

I use 1 1/2" for normal riding, measuring it at the bolt of the slider

Yeah brand new chain(regina) and sprockets. Trail riding with the occasional hare scramble and dual sport rides thrown in. I do ride damn near every weekend. The new chain and sprockets were making a racket last weekend so I thought I had too much slack at 1 3/4.

Kind of depends on what kind of riding your doing,
No, it doesn't. It does make a difference what year your bike is, though. On a steel frame 450, 1 3/4" is probably OK. On the Aluminum framed models, 1 15/16" is the minimum.

And that isn't slack, that's a measurement taken from the rear slider bolt to the lifted chain.

Allow more slack if you'll be running in a lot of mud.

It all depends on how much true slack there is at the point where the centers of the output shaft, swing arm pivot, and rear axle all line up, as that is where the chain is tightest. You need a minimum of 1/2" at that point. The specs from the manual are based on this adjustment.

Is that measured slack at the tightest point of the chain or at the loosest?

Kind of depends on what kind of riding your doing, if you hitting big jumps I'd get more. For woods that will work. Is the chain new? If it is it will stretch throughout ride time.

:worthy::lol: :lol: :banghea:busted: d:

I have an 03 so I ought to be ok. Thanks the help

yes it is

Is that measured slack at the tightest point of the chain or at the loosest?
If you mean that you have spots in the chain that are significantly looser than others, you should measure that section of the chain, and seriously consider replacing it. But the slack should be measured at the tightest point, always.

Apparently this was NOT a simple yes or no question after all.:worthy:

Kind of depends on what kind of riding your doing...
No, it doesn't.

Allow more slack if you'll be running in a lot of mud.

So does it, or does it not depend on what kind of riding you're doing?:worthy:

I never gave it much thought and always ran the [approximate] recommended 1-1/2" in all kinds of conditions and never had any problems. My chain and sprockets seem to be indestructible.

So does it, or does it not depend on what kind of riding you're doing?:worthy:
It can depend on the environment you're riding in. Some types of mud can build up on the sprockets enough to effectively enlarge them, so more slack can be required.

It does not depend on whether you do or don't do a lot of jumping, etc., because the chain is tightest at a point only halfway through the travel of the rear suspension.

I never gave it much thought and always ran the [approximate] recommended 1-1/2" in all kinds of conditions and never had any problems. My chain and sprockets seem to be indestructible.
The manual for your bike recommends no such thing. The specs are 1.9 - 2.3" (48-58mm). Here's what I want you to try:

Set your chain at your preferred 1.5" on the stand, wheels off the ground. Now, remove the bolt that anchors your shock linkage to the swing arm and raise the wheel until the centers of the output shaft, swing arm pivot, and rear axle all align and tell me how much slack you have. What's that? Too tight to raise it that far? Hmm.

Chains have snapped, hubs have been torn apart, and in certain KTM's the backs of transmissions have even been pulled out because of just this problem.

Here's a more in depth look:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=405031

The manual for your bike recommends no such thing. The specs are 1.9 - 2.3" (48-58mm).
I'm about 2000 miles from my manual right now, that's why I said appoximate. Too many numbers in my head to remember everything. :banana: 1.9" does sound better and that is what I use. :worthy:

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