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Yamalube junk??

46 posts in this topic

so far the general idea on here tends to be that yamalube isnt very good oil. i have always ran it in my bikes, but after reading some threads it got me worried and i want to change to a better oil. what are your thoughts? i am running semi synthetic but i am considering going to full synthetic, so im open to either.

one more question... i like to change my oil after every ride but if i go to full synthetic, it would get expensive. so is it better to use semi synthetic and change the oil every time or use full synthetic and change it every other ride? thanks

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If you change your oil every ride then Yamalube isn't a problem. The biggest issue with Yamalube is it shears down and loses its viscosity in less time than some other oils.

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so far the general idea on here tends to be that yamalube isnt very good oil. i have always ran it in my bikes, but after reading some threads it got me worried and i want to change to a better oil. what are your thoughts? i am running semi synthetic but i am considering going to full synthetic, so im open to either.

one more question... i like to change my oil after every ride but if i go to full synthetic, it would get expensive. so is it better to use semi synthetic and change the oil every time or use full synthetic and change it every other ride? thanks

Where's the proof or facts to support your topic? You think Yamaha would develop an oil that doesn't work/perform? The oil is good enough for factory bikes but not weekend riders/racers? Just wondering why you think it's junk.

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and i can beat every one of those oils for HALF the price. or less.

yamalube is not made by yamaha. it is jobbed out to the lowest oil company bidder and made/blended to spec. that's it. WAY over priced.

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and i can beat every one of those oils for HALF the price. or less.

yamalube is not made by yamaha. it is jobbed out to the lowest oil company bidder and made/blended to spec. that's it. WAY over priced.

and amsoil not? Yamalube is blended by spectro. But Yamaha as other companies spend countless man hrs and money in R&D for what additive packages that are needed for the engine's oil.

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and amsoil not? Yamalube is blended by spectro. But Yamaha as other companies spend countless man hrs and money in R&D for what additive packages that are needed for the engine's oil.
None of which changes the fact that in an industry standard ASTM D-6278 shear test conducted by an independent lab, at least one YamaLube blend failed to retain its viscosity through a single cycle of the test, whereas Amsoil MCF, MCV, and a handful of other oils did so through 4 such cycles.

This is a problem industry wide that was not apparently realized until the past decade, and is still not well understood by the public. The Viscosity Improvers used in the majority of engine oils are not tough enough for use in a transmission oil, and fail under such use, leaving the oil thinner than labeled by at least one full grade after as little as one hour's use.

There are two cures, and two only. The first is simply to use a straight grade oil in place of multi-grades. Straight grades use few VII's if any, so there are none for the transmission to tear up. As a result, straight grades are extremely shear stable. But you lose the advantage of improved cold start lubrication and temperature flexibility, and since very few straight grades are synthetics, another set of advantages is lost.

The second way is the path chosen by Amsoil, Mobil 1, Spectro, and a growing number of others: use the more costly VII's made for multi-grade gear oils so that they will hold up under the thrashing given the oil in a shared engine/transmission combination.

It is very unlikely, although possible, that Yamaha "developed" anything to do with the YamaLube line. Typically, a manufacturer's engineering teams simply look up the oil requirements for a given engine based on published SAE or other standards and specify an oil that meets those standards. At that point, these standards are passed to a product team, which shops the requirements to a blender for the best price. So if all you ask for is "Meets or exceeds API SJ" or JASO MA, that's all you'll get.

There can be exceptions, as there are with Chevrolet and Porsche recommending/requiring Mobil 1 for some of their vehicles, but these are a recent phenomena, and still rare.

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You do make some good points. Everybody claims they have had an independent lab perform the test and it's always in their favor. There is a ton of great information in the oil study but I still feel that it's a marketing guide for Amsoil. I agree that Amsoil does make good products but they don't manufacture engines.

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my independent lab shows amsoil to NOT hold up in a 250f. gray shows the same oil holding up in a 450f.

in my experiences, and i have a LOT, most oils dont hold up.

and, if you call the amsoil tech line, *they* will tell you to change the oil at 5hrs or less.

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yamalube is not even close to junk. if it was junk would yamaha dealers, reps, factory racers, demos, and test riders use it? i know a guy that runs snowmobile demo's. he hardly ever changes oil. and those sleds get the piss rode out of them. and after that season is over... the sleds are sent back to yamaha for study. you wouldn't believe the R & D that actually goes on. every engine yamaha puts to market is tested with yamalube. for their endurance test they put the engine on a dyno (with a good load) and the engine must hold together at WOT for 48 hours straight (that is under pirfect conditions, dont try this at home!). why would yamaha sell junk oil?

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every engine yamaha puts to market is tested with yamalube.

for their endurance test they put the engine on a dyno (with a good load) and the engine must hold together at WOT for 48 hours straight

Do you have any support for these two assertions?

BTW, have you ever seen the "dyno test" where some additive company runs an engine for half an hour with no oil? Care to try to duplicate that one at home?

why would yamaha sell junk oil?
Why would Mobil, Shell, Castrol , Ford, GM, Honda. ....ad infinitum? First, I did not say YamaLube was "junk". I have said, and until testing demonstrates otherwise, I will continue to say that Yamalube is not capable of remaining within its published viscosity grade for an adequate long period of time.

Second, every one of the major players on the list above makes or markets oils that range from barely adequate for light duty to cutting edge premium lubricants. But even so, relatively few make an engine oil that's up to the job of lubing a transmission, even those who produce supposed "motorcycle oils", and if they were used as such, they would fail in the manner I have described. The number who do make oils up to the job is growing, but it doesn't include everyone yet.

If you want your eyes opened, try sampling your own oil for analysis sometime.

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just out of curiosity what kind of oil do you use grayracer?
I use Amsoil MCF (10w-40) except for the 3 warmest months of the year, when I use MCV (20w-50) instead. Prior to that, I used Mobil 1 Racing 4T, and only switched to the Amsoil because I found it to be at least as good and much less expensive. I buy it online in 4 gallon cases as a preferred customer.

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I have used Yamalube oil in my 2001 WR250 exclusively. I admit I would change the oil quite frequently though. I rebuilt the engine about 3 years ago and the insides looked extremely clean and I did not find any major components worn. This bike still runs excellent today.

I do believe that Yamalube is not the highest quality oil you can buy. Nor is it the cheapest. I guess my point is, that with the proper maintenance intervals, a standard quality oil would suffice for most operating conditions. And as we all know, that is exactly what the factory engineers design for.

My new KTM will get the factory recommended Motorex oil. Changed at the factory recommended intervals. Or sooner, if it sees extreme duty.

My opinion? Use whatever you are comfortable with.

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Has Yamalube always been made by Spectro or did that just happen this last year when they started selling full synthetic? I wonder how the new formulas of Yamalube would fair in the test and if they are exactly the same as the Spectro off the shelf. Only a test would tell. So far Maxima extra has held up well for me changing the oil every 6-8hrs. The red line oil is supposed to be really good also but I don't think I'll use it because it's JASO MB.

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You should never use a JASO MB oil in any application where a clutch is involved. That's what the MB means. MA/MA2 only.

I don't know if Spectro makes Yamalube. I don't recall anyone saying that in this thread. If you examine the Amsoil test, you'll see on page 9 that Spectro 4 did well in the shear test, while Yamalube fared poorly, so there's nothing there to connect the two, either.

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and amsoil not? Yamalube is blended by spectro. But Yamaha as other companies spend countless man hrs and money in R&D for what additive packages that are needed for the engine's oil.

I thought that maybe when Yamalube changed their line of oils that Spectro started making it since they are running the same weights and blends now.

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