02 WR426 Trail Suspension Settings

I'm starting to look into the stock suspension on my 2002 WR426 and looking for some suggestions. I am new to highly adjustable suspensions so any help is appreciated. I ride mostly tighter trails and help with cornering is always good. I am about 5'9" 180lbs and not crazy about spending a bunch of money with custom work... not right now anyway.

Current settings from bikes previous owner on stock suspension:

Forks:

Compression-15 clicks out

Rebound-12 clicks out

Rear:

Low Compression-16 clicks out

High Compression- 1 3/8 turns out

Rebound-11 clicks out

Thanks for the help.

As a beginner to the suspension adjustment world I'm looking for some basic direction for my type of riding(trails). Maybe some pros and cons to harder vs. softer?

From what I can tell the settings I'm running now are a bit soft compared to the standards in the manual.

Thanks for any help or advise.

IMO the best thing to do is bring the settings back to the factory settings, take it for a ride and go from there. The 02 wr426 was built for a rider about your weight (170-180) so you may or may not need to re-spring in the future.

IMO the best thing to do is bring the settings back to the factory settings, take it for a ride and go from there. The 02 wr426 was built for a rider about your weight (170-180) so you may or may not need to re-spring in the future.

Thanks. Any other general info that might help point me in the right direction like whats better for cornering, best for hard trails, best for mud. I think I'll know if it is too stiff and I'm rattling off the bike but not sure I'll know/ recognize if it is too soft. I may just get used to it.

Your WRF works best with sag set around 3.9 to 4.1 inches. Then that in turn determines where your forks should be in the triple clamps for turning and stability.

When dialing in the compression and rebound, many like to set everything to the middle and adjust one end at a time. Front compression. Write the number down. Front rebound. Write it down. Go to the back and repeat. Then fine-tune.

You mentioned mud. Obviously the added weight will mimic a heavier rider at times. Some like to take a little sag out, maybe put in more compression and rebound. You'll get to a point where you know how the bike behaves in mud, sand, etc., and can make simple adjustments before heading out.

Good point by yamalink. Set your sag first then fine tune.

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