How do I get more forward traction (suspension)?

I have my suspension where I want it comfort wise for trails, etc, and the only thing I'd like to approve on is getting the front up easier when wanting to get over obsticals and stuff....

Bike has tons of power, and pull's hard, and I have the proper spring for my weight, etc.....

When it DOES hook up, it will certainly pull the front....as a example, on a side part of my lawn, on the grass....no problem....but on the trails, it just lights up the rear tire..

I'm running a Maxxis desert IT (120...), and I LOVE the wear I get with it, and as for conditions, we have everything here from rock, to loose shale, granite, to mud, to chip seal, sand....a lot of fire road riding...in short, i really need a "do it all tire", with good wear...

Should I set my sag "stiffer"?

How much space have you got between the rubber and mudflap? Get it as close as possible - maybe 5/8th away from the flap, that will get it hooking a lot better than if you have 1.5" space.

The spring preload is specifically designed to have the spring work properly for the weight of the rider - chaging it (making it stiffer) will adversely affect how your bike handles, however, many people just go ahead and change the setting from recommended anyways.

Learn to use your clutch and body properly - proper clutch/body control should allow you to pop the front up whenever, where ever, just twisting the throttle doesn't always do it. If you get your weight back over your tire when you want the front to come up it will really help make your tire bite so the front jumps up. Pull clutch in - rev the engine more and let the clutch out - you're putting more power to the wheels at a higher RPM and it should make the front jump right up.

A tire that has good wear usually means it's harder, a soft tire will bite easier than a hard tire which will tend to break loose more.

I went up on the compresion clickers 2 clicks, and it helped some, and I can get the rear tire could be closer....but, all I'm doing it twisting the throttle, no clutch, no body inputs...I'm thinking I need to practice proper riding technique.....

I went up on the compresion clickers 2 clicks, and it helped some, and I can get the rear tire could be closer....but, all I'm doing it twisting the throttle, no clutch, no body inputs...I'm thinking I need to practice proper riding technique.....

You hit the nail on the head.

The bike is just a tool. You must figure out how to use it for what you need it to do. Body english is important. Don't 'drive' the bike, 'ride' it! Stay centered on the bike (left/ right and front/back) as much as possible. Float with the bike. DONT 'SIT' ON IT! The seat is there to cushion your butt, not support it. 50% of your weight should be on the pegs at all times, or 100% standing up. Move you body in the opposite direction the bike drifts, to change course.

Put all your weight on the outside peg when cornering, and you will gain tons of traction.

Always roll the throttle, never whack it, unless you have something to push off of. Otherwise, you are just spinning. Roll it as fast as you can and still retain traction. That is the key. Use the clutch to regain traction (remove spin).

You should also consider changing the gearing, gear it up.

You don't say what size F/R sprokets you are running, but it sounds like you may benefit from dropping a tooth or two on the rear, or even 1 tooth on the front.

The WR has plenty of pull, so you' should still be able to loft the front while reducing wheelspin.

A friend of mine runs 14/44 on his 03 450, 100% offroad. For similar trails I like 13/50, but its all down to personal preference.

You should also consider changing the gearing, gear it up.

You don't say what size F/R sprokets you are running, but it sounds like you may benefit from dropping a tooth or two on the rear, or even 1 tooth on the front.

The WR has plenty of pull, so you' should still be able to loft the front while reducing wheelspin.

A friend of mine runs 14/44 on his 03 450, 100% offroad. For similar trails I like 13/50, but its all down to personal preference.

I have 14/51 right now, but already have a new set in 13/48 to go on when the current set needs replacing, which I think I'll like. I had 13/50 before this set, and found it to be a bit low. I only do off road.

I completely understand what you are saying though, as I noticed it when going from the 13/50 to 14/51, but I think I'll like the 13/48 better for the trails I do, even though i understand it won't help my traction issue...

Actually, it might help, because I'm hoping to be pulling third, lower revs with the 13/48, where now I'm in second with higher revs with my current 14/51 on the trails here

Your back tire is worn out.

Maxxis aren't very good new.

Your back tire is worn out.

Maxxis aren't very good new.

What??

As you know, your sag should be 3.9 inches to 4.1 inches, and properly sprung for your weight. Falling too far out of that range won't help the bike's overall handling and or your desire to get more forward traction.

I have my suspension where I want it comfort wise for trails, etc,

Should I set my sag "stiffer"?

Spring rate is correct, I just put a brand new rece tech spring for my weight in it......

I brushed up on proper way to check sag, and realized I have not been doing it quite right....

So, checking setting my sag the RIGHT way is my next step.....

You need to re check sag after a couple of rides with a new spring, it has to settle in.

I have my suspension where I want it comfort wise for trails, etc, and the only thing I'd like to approve on is getting the front up easier when wanting to get over obsticals and stuff....

Be careful what you ask for.

Improving "hook up" will likely happen at the expense of something else (like keeping the front end down when you need it down. An example of this is putting the rear wheel as far forward as possible. That will help transfer weight to the rear wheel, but what about hill climbs (since you said that you ride trails) and high-speed handling? Both of those things benefit from a longer wheelbase, not a shorter one. From what I read, you're on the right track with setting your sag properly. After that, revisit the hooking-up issue while you're working on riding technique. There's already been plenty of good advice in this thread. :doh:

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