Can this be welded???

A Journeyman Welder is expected to be capable of producing defect free welds that have a workmanship like appearance and routinely pass nondestructive examination. At minimum, a journeyman welder should be capable of producing these welds utilizing the SMAW, GMAW, and FCAW processes in all positions and in an efficient manner as may be prescribed by established time standards. In addition, a journeyman welder should be capable of producing suitable welds utilizing the SAW and GTAW processes.

Tasks Performed (expected performance):

- Produce quality production welds in a timely manner utilizing the processes defined above

- Read, interpret, and execute weld procedures (WPS) with no supervision; this is to include proper electrode selection, setting of amperage and volts, understanding preheat and inter-pass requirements, gas settings, DCEP / DCEN, and other variables prescribed by the WPS

- Make setups as required to facilitate welding of products

- Make quality cuts utilizing oxy-fuel and hand plasma processes

- Be capable of utilizing the Carbon Arc Gouging (CAG) process

- Produce quality welds or weldments utilizing all processes described above and be capable of hand grinding to assure quality products

- Consistent failure rate of less than 10% (Radiographically Examined Welds)

- Consistent failure rate of less than 5% (Magnetic Particle and Dye Penetrant Examined Welds)

There is a difference between this and the backyard welder.

A Journeyman Welder is expected to be capable of producing defect free welds that have a workmanship like appearance and routinely pass nondestructive examination. At minimum, a journeyman welder should be capable of producing these welds utilizing the SMAW, GMAW, and FCAW processes in all positions and in an efficient manner as may be prescribed by established time standards. In addition, a journeyman welder should be capable of producing suitable welds utilizing the SAW and GTAW processes.

Tasks Performed (expected performance):

- Produce quality production welds in a timely manner utilizing the processes defined above

- Read, interpret, and execute weld procedures (WPS) with no supervision; this is to include proper electrode selection, setting of amperage and volts, understanding preheat and inter-pass requirements, gas settings, DCEP / DCEN, and other variables prescribed by the WPS

- Make setups as required to facilitate welding of products

- Make quality cuts utilizing oxy-fuel and hand plasma processes

- Be capable of utilizing the Carbon Arc Gouging (CAG) process

- Produce quality welds or weldments utilizing all processes described above and be capable of hand grinding to assure quality products

- Consistent failure rate of less than 10% (Radiographically Examined Welds)

- Consistent failure rate of less than 5% (Magnetic Particle and Dye Penetrant Examined Welds)

There is a difference between this and the backyard welder.

Good info 08YZ450Derek.

I was not required to CAG, but I did when I was in highschool. It actually melted holes in my helmet. I NEVER wanna do that again...

Yes, that is a dangerous process. Along with overhead welding postion, I really do not like that one either. I don't weld much anymore these days, but I would love to get my hands on a new TIG welder or even a Miller MIG machine. Its fun to weld the exotic stuff like Titanium, it looks so cool when you do it right. The welds on my 08's header look real good. Though stainless I though was easy, but aluminum just gets so hot and real fast too. You gotta be good or you will melt aluminum like butter.:)

Dont do overhead too much, but have, and it is indeed hairy.

If you have the money look for a Miller Syncrowave 250. They can be had for roughly 2500. Their low amperage arc stability is incredible.

A Journeyman Welder is expected to be capable of producing defect free welds that have a workmanship like appearance and routinely pass nondestructive examination. At minimum, a journeyman welder should be capable of producing these welds utilizing the SMAW, GMAW, and FCAW processes in all positions and in an efficient manner as may be prescribed by established time standards. In addition, a journeyman welder should be capable of producing suitable welds utilizing the SAW and GTAW processes.

Tasks Performed (expected performance):

- Produce quality production welds in a timely manner utilizing the processes defined above

- Read, interpret, and execute weld procedures (WPS) with no supervision; this is to include proper electrode selection, setting of amperage and volts, understanding preheat and inter-pass requirements, gas settings, DCEP / DCEN, and other variables prescribed by the WPS

- Make setups as required to facilitate welding of products

- Make quality cuts utilizing oxy-fuel and hand plasma processes

- Be capable of utilizing the Carbon Arc Gouging (CAG) process

- Produce quality welds or weldments utilizing all processes described above and be capable of hand grinding to assure quality products

- Consistent failure rate of less than 10% (Radiographically Examined Welds)

- Consistent failure rate of less than 5% (Magnetic Particle and Dye Penetrant Examined Welds)

There is a difference between this and the backyard welder.

Im a boilermaker by trade and do everything you have listed nearly everyday.Ive had my welds xrayed and magnetic particle and dye test and not failed 1.That stuff is everyday work for a boily so does that mean i should have a welders trade aswell.Im not bagging you but it just doesnt exist here sure u have to get the hours up on pressure and other tickets but they still do not class that as a trade here.Maybe different in your country .But btw i hate welding cannot stand it.

In my country? I am a vet BTW, maybe you should rethink you're negative comments before posting my friend. I was merely trying to help out the poster on here about his cast aluminum part. I never said anything about trade professions or anything. A boilermaker and a welder are two totally different professions, if you do not think so, then I don't know what to tell you. If you are certified, then it is easier to get a job and prove you're skills in the trade via weld tests.

Isn't this a forum on the cast part?

Oh, sorry.. You are from Australia. I don't know how it works in the country you live in.

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