Can this be welded???

I cracked a mounting bracket on my front brake caliper on a 2003 yz 45o.

I know it's cast aluminum but can it be welded to work??

If so then what would it take?

earl

Cast aluminum can be welded by any good TIG welder.

heli-arc?

Do you think a weld would hold??

Or would it be better to get one.

earl

if welded properly it's stronger than original, like breaking a bone. the extra material gives extra strength. but it has to be done right.

a proper weld is stronger than the surrounding material... the key word is "proper"

I assume you are asking about welding because Yamaha does not sell the part without out buying a whole caliper,:ride: but you can buy a Honda caliper hanger fairly cheep and be done with worrying about the quality of a weld.

Honda part # 45190-MEN-006 :p

Hope this helps!

I assume you are asking about welding because Yamaha does not sell the part without out buying a whole caliper,:ride: but you can buy a Honda caliper hanger fairly cheep and be done with worrying about the quality of a weld.

Honda part # 45190-MEN-006 :p

Hope this helps!

Will it fit on the existing Nissin Caliper?? Is the Honda and YZ identical??

earl

I am A welder by trade. to TIG weld a crack in a caliper will take less than 1 hour to weld and may be the shop minium charge. it's not a big deal. i once broke the alum cast on a pinch bolt for the front axel on a wr250. i welded it and it was still strong a year later when i sold the bike.

Will it fit on the existing Nissin Caliper?? Is the Honda and YZ identical??

earl

Yes it is the same , will bolt right up

I assume you are asking about welding because Yamaha does not sell the part without out buying a whole caliper,:ride: but you can buy a Honda caliper hanger fairly cheep and be done with worrying about the quality of a weld.

Honda part # 45190-MEN-006 :p

Hope this helps!

Been there... $300 plus later

Any welder that can weld TIG process and has a welder set up properly can weld your part for you. ALOT of TIG welders are not very skilled in this type of welding. It is more difficult to TIG weld than any other process. It could look worse than when you brought it in. Make sure if you get it welded, that you check the weld quality before leaving the shop. Make sure there are no cracks, or holes (porosity) in the weld bead. Also, as good measure, look at your welds on the frame of your bike. That is how they should look when the part is finished. If the bead looks like a string of snot on the metal, its is poor quality penetration, and is not correct.

If the weld has been grinded over by a grinder, that means the welder sucks and does not want you to see the quality of the weld, and it makes it weaker as well. And it would not take an "hour" to do. I know of no one who welds a few inches and takes an hour. I was a certified welder when I went to college, and my father owned a fabrication shop for over 25 years. It shouldn't be much more than maybe $20.:p

Been there... $300 plus later

Please explain, that is just a bit vague

Any welder that can weld TIG process and has a welder set up properly can weld your part for you. ALOT of TIG welders are not very skilled in this type of welding. It is more difficult to TIG weld than any other process. It could look worse than when you brought it in. Make sure if you get it welded, that you check the weld quality before leaving the shop. Make sure there are no cracks, or holes (porosity) in the weld bead. Also, as good measure, look at your welds on the frame of your bike. That is how they should look when the part is finished. If the bead looks like a string of snot on the metal, its is poor quality penetration, and is not correct.

If the weld has been grinded over by a grinder, that means the welder sucks and does not want you to see the quality of the weld, and it makes it weaker as well. And it would not take an "hour" to do. I know of no one who welds a few inches and takes an hour. I was a certified welder when I went to college, and my father owned a fabrication shop for over 25 years. It shouldn't be much more than maybe $20.:)

The part will need to be brought up to 350 degrees before you even weld it, how would that take ? then to weld probaly pretty close to 45 min JMO

The part will need to be brought up to 350 degrees before you even weld it, how would that take ? then to weld probaly pretty close to 45 min JMO
Doesn't require that kind of preheat, and if it takes you 45 minutes to weld what amounts to two pieces of 3/4" square stock together, I think you're approaching the task the wrong way.

Take it up to bout 100 degrees just enuf that u could juggle it in your hands.Make sure it is clean as even drop it into thinners before u take ther cant be any contamanation what so ever.Then make sure he preps the edges a bit which means bevel them and if he is a good tig welder and knows what hes doingit would take him a minute to weld u just have 2 make sure ur prep work is rite.And to every1 who says ther a welder by trade there is no such thing,you dont do a 4yr apprentiship.You get tickets but it is not a trade.I knew a guy that use to say he was an oxy welder by trade what a goose

I agree with greyracer, and you do not need to "preheat" cast aluminum to that heat. Practice and knowledge make a good welder. If you know how to use the machine, with TIG you must keep the electrode sharpened correctly. And have correct gas flow setting, along with correct machine setting for the metal you will be using as well as good quality filler.

Next, it is up to the welder and his skills to correctly weld the bead. With TIG it is a two hand ordeal. Not like MIG when I can weld with one hand. I am certified to weld in all positions and multi pass structural integrity welds. I have built trusses for buildings and bridges, and just about anything you could think of. MIG TIG Flux Core, Heli ARC Stick whatever, I can do it.

Anyways, if you really do take it to be welded, just take the advise I have kindly posted and good luck with saving some cash! Hope my posts have helped.

Oh and, the surface of the product must be clean. I would stay from using any types of solvents if possible. Use a wire brush to clean the surface before you take it to the welder. He will be a happy camper if you do.

I happen to be a journeyman welder. I specialize in TIG welding (hence the username) thin wall ss tubing and aluminum. Pay shipping to MD both way and it will be fixed.

And to every1 who says ther a welder by trade there is no such thing,you dont do a 4yr apprentiship.You get tickets but it is not a trade.I knew a guy that use to say he was an oxy welder by trade what a goose

I did the 4 year journeyman apprenticeship. My company paid for it, I just finished. Needed 8000 hours of on the job experience, and a hell of alot of hours of classroom instruction.

The state of MD considers welding a trade, and set my base salary as such.

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