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yammerman

What's the operating temperature of a 2006 WR450?

9 posts in this topic

So, I had overheating problems on my 2006 WR450. I recently bought Factory Effex temperature stickers to help me monitor the engine. However, I don't know what the normal operating temperature is. Anybody know?

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Is this a new problem? If so, the more important question is what has changed to cause it to start overheating ie clogged/damaged radiator, head gasket leak etc? I know these bikes don't like to idle for long periods, or extended periods of slow speed high load riding.

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I realize I need to rule out what caused the overheating, and I have done much of that already. I just want to monitor my engine under various riding conditions (e.g., slow-paced single track) to see what's happening. I can get a baseline on my own, but I was hoping someone knew the approximate temp for typical or ideal situations.

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Those temp strips would baseline your bike so you'd be aware of any change. Can't hurt. Coolant system on all the new bikes are pretty bullet proof, so maybe what you think is overheating due to some problem is just the nature of the beast.

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Have you considered replacing your computer with a Vapor? It has a temp sensor that's installed in-line in one of the rad hoses and gives you a digital read-out of your coolant temperature. It also has a tach function and is back-lit for night time use.

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where is the correct place to mount a temp sensor for the gauge?

I had mine on the long hose on the shifter side radiator nest to the tank bolt.I'm not sure that was the best place.My always seemed to read cooler than I had expected.I think 160 degrees.And if I was out on the road, I couldn't even get a reading cause it stopped picking up under 123 degrees.

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I run mine on the right side of the bike on the cylinder. For street use it doesn't even register. In tight stuff it will climb to about 190. As long as i'm moving it seems to be alright.

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where is the correct place to mount a temp sensor for the gauge?

I had mine on the long hose on the shifter side radiator nest to the tank bolt.I'm not sure that was the best place.My always seemed to read cooler than I had expected.I think 160 degrees.And if I was out on the road, I couldn't even get a reading cause it stopped picking up under 123 degrees.

the vapor instructions say to mount the sensor in the upper line going to the rad , it also say keep it as close to the head as you can. the truth of the matter is the best place would be drilled into the head right in the water jacket . but on must bikes this is way to much trouble , for your gauge to be 5-10 degrees closer . basiclly speeking you don't want it to boil over EVER so Aways keep it below 212 F . I try to shut mine down by 200 . mine never gets above 140 on the hottest day if I'm moving at a fair pace I'd say atleast 15mph below that it starts heating up . when it reaches 170 I try to pickup the pace. If you do run at a very slow pace alot and have trouble getting hot , you can get a boysen oversized water pump . They made it for people that run on tight single track where your rpm is down are the water is not flowing.

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There seems to be a bit of worry about heat on an engine. My understanding is you want a little bit of heat so you can burn off condensation. Water is a bi product of combustion, so if you don't get your engine warm enough to burn that off you can get a build up of water from what I understand.

This is a big problem with boats because they run raw water and operating temperatures can be at about 140 on the water side. (I own a hot rod boat so most of my experience from operating temperatures comes from that) Now oil temperature is a different story, I wonder if there is a way of monitoring that instead of water temperature? If the water temp is low but oil temp is high enough then the condensation can get burned off.

~Brian

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