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Essential tools....what do you take with you....

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So ive just bought a fender bag, and was wondering what tools and stuff other people take with them before heading out on the trails?

:worthy:

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In addition to wrenches for the most common fasteners, pliers, screwdrivers, small vise-grips, small adjustable wrench, 2 extra master links, zip ties etc., I now carry a chain breaker and a short length of O-ring chain. On a recent ride in Michigan, a buddy's chain broke. Although we had plenty of master links, noone had a chain breaker or extra chain links. If we had had a breaker and chain links, the whole thing would have been a small bump in the road. As it was, it was a major cluster with plenty of profanity and slamming of tools. We finally got things cobbled up with a little McGyvering and he limped back to the campground.

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In the front bag, Motion Pro T6 Tire levers with wrench ends to fit front, rear and rim locks. "Second Wind" CO2 Inflator/mini-pump, valve core remoal tool, tire patch kit, and Motion Pro T6 Bead Buddy. Oh, and a front tube.

In the rear fender bag, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 17 mm combination wrenches, 8, 10, 12 and 14 mm sockets and an ASV Y handle to turn them, screwdriver handle with No 2 & No 1 phillips, and 1/4" flat bits, small pair of channel loks, small pair of needlenose channel loks (with wire cutters), 1x International trailside chain breaker, leatherman tool, 3 links of chain and 2 master links, 3 ft of fuel line, duct tape and electrical tape (wrapped around the screwdriver shaft) assorted nuts and bolts (including front and rear axle nuts...don't ask), spare clutch, brake and shift levers, reading glasses (getting old sucks) and a couple of shop rags.

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In the front bag, Motion Pro T6 Tire levers with wrench ends to fit front, rear and rim locks. "Second Wind" CO2 Inflator/mini-pump, valve core remoal tool, tire patch kit, and Motion Pro T6 Bead Buddy. Oh, and a front tube.

In the rear fender bag, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 17 mm combination wrenches, 8, 10, 12 and 14 mm sockets and an ASV Y handle to turn them, screwdriver handle with No 2 & No 1 phillips, and 1/4" flat bits, small pair of channel loks, small pair of needlenose channel loks (with wire cutters), 1x International trailside chain breaker, leatherman tool, 3 links of chain and 2 master links, 3 ft of fuel line, duct tape and electrical tape (wrapped around the screwdriver shaft) assorted nuts and bolts (including front and rear axle nuts...don't ask), spare clutch, brake and shift levers, reading glasses (getting old sucks) and a couple of shop rags.

were you a boyscott ? that's is most people's whole shop. I almost carry as much myself . I modded a dmx tool kit from cruz tools . I have all their stuff but I've swapped few things . I swapped their adjustable wrench for a creasent 6inch that opens wider. I put in a patch kit and a pump. motion pro spark plug wrench , a spark plug , saftey wire , zip ties , black tape , metric allen flipset, 2 master links .

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I always ride with a few guys who carry everything for both Jap and Euro bikes. Their packs weigh a ton!

I carry: spare front brake and clutch lever , big crescent wrench, 10 and 12mm, long flatblade screwdriver, tape, zip ties and toilet paper (which I use on my extended break/walk through the woods while my friends who carry everything fix everyone elses bikes).

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were you a boyscott ?

Nope...never a boy scout. I have, however, had to beg, borrow, mickey mouse or walk out due to the lack of everything that I carry with me. Karma being what it is, if I have it, I won't t need it, but if I don't have it, I sure as heck will need it. You should see what I carry in my camelback!

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In my 5 years of owning and riding bikes, I've never had to carry tools with me. All that ever went wrong was multiple times that I'd run outta gas, and once on the lil' quad that I had, the chain jumped off and wedged in between the rear sprocket and the drum brake. 20min fix using some branches and off I went again:ride:

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Nope...never a boy scout. I have, however, had to beg, borrow, mickey mouse or walk out due to the lack of everything that I carry with me. Karma being what it is, if I have it, I won't t need it, but if I don't have it, I sure as heck will need it. You should see what I carry in my camelback!

I've never been very lucky either . so anytime I have something mess up I start carring the tool for it . If you want a example of unluck here's my lasted .

I T-boned a White-tailed deer on my way to work satarday evening . I was on the 07wr450 going like 60 mph . the thing was along the edge of a hill in the middle of the corner I was going into , there was not time to brake so I pulled the bike acrossed the yellow line to give the deer more space . but it decided to make a dash for it in my direction . Anyhow I hit it square in the side . at that point I could no longer see what's going on because I had a deer blocking my headlight . next thing I could see was the bike sliding down the road about 15 ft. in front of me . I watched that for awhile "it seemed like a long time but I'm sure it wasn't " "by the way a titanium footpeg makes cool looking sparkson the road" til I came to a stop . then I got up and when over to pick the bike up . about the time I got there it stalled . picked it up . the pro bend hand guard had taken a beating and the right one was holding the brake on . so I hurryed up and turned the headlight out then twisted the gaurd out of the way . then I refired the bike it didn't want to at first but it did when I gave the kicker a few stabs while holding the e-z button . I then rode the rest of the way to work and clocked in , before I was late . I went out later to check on the damage . it was not too bad at all . broke the front fender , messed up probends , ground on all of my sliders , there's a slight bend in my handbars . a little dent in my pipe and the one bracket for the can is cracked . my peg, front brake lever are ground down abit . but not nearly as bad as the gear I was wearing . anyhow I'm sore all over . but I don't have any road rash so my gear did it's job . Now the bad news I have to wait for the insurance guy to call before I fix or even wash it " it really really needs washed it smells like deer crap BAD really BAD " And no I don't know what happen to the deer.

I really need to mount one of those cheap camera's on the bike . it would have made a good you tube vid.

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without listing everything, i will add that i do most bike maintenance at home using only tools from the fanny pack. including changing tires. then if i need to do something on the trail, i have the necessary tools. and i'm familiar with them.

i did carry a chain breaker for while after i started using primary drive chains until i figured out the chain problems were not a string of bad luck but rather the brand. after switching back to a quality chain i no longer carry the chain breaker. i do chain maintenance out of the tool box at home.

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I alway invite a friend who bring a nice fanny pack of tools along. :worthy:

We have a guy like that in our riding group. Needless to say, he suffers mightily when he needs tools. :eek::banghead:

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My buddies and I frequently ride dual sports and also take long "training" rides on the weekends. One poster below said he does all his chain maintenance at home so he doesn't need to carry chain tools. I definitely disagree with that assessment. I have been out in the middle of nowhere with some friends and my buddy busted his chain because he sucked a rock into the rear sprocket. His chain was in good shape until that happened. That just illustrates that even a good chain might need repair on the trail.

I do agree with him regarding doing your maintenance with your trail tools though. It helps point out shortcomings in your tool set before you get out on the trail.

I'm the guy you want riding with you on your next ride if you have a breakdown. Here's my list of tools/supplies:

Front Fender Pack

*Spare front tube (Because you can fold it or tie a knot in it and use it for the rear too)

*Small pump (like a basketball pump)

*Tow strap

Backpack

*2 ea Motion Pro Combo Tire Lever/Axle Nut Wrench (to fit my axle nuts, the other guys are screwed, but that's their problem)

*8, 10, 12 mm Combo Wrenches (I'm thinking about dropping these because of the t-handle set listed below)

*A short piece of dowel with a couple of feet of duct tape, electrical tape, and safety wire wrapped around it

*A small handful of zip ties

*Tube patch kit

*Spare spark plug

*Leatherman tool

*Chain tool

*About 6 links of new chain

*2 Spare master links

*6 inch pliers (slip joint type)

*1/4 square drive t-handle with a bunch of various bits (Screwdriver, hex socket head, 6 thru 12 mm sockets)

*Toilet paper in a ziplock bag (usually a handful of napkins I grabbed at Mickey D's on the way to go riding)

I raced mountain bikes for years and found that no matter what preparations I did before the race there was always a chance an unexpected occurance could strand me on the course at any time. I just carried that philosophy with me to the dirt bike. It seems to have worked, I have helped out 2 or 3 of my buddies on the trail and myself a few times too.

In general, take whatever you think you need to get the job done on the trail. Keep it as light as you can by bringing along combo tools like the Leatherman tool and also purchasing lightweight tools like the Motion Pro levers/wrenches (forged aluminum and very sweet!).

Regardless of what anyone might say, a tool set is kind of a personal thing and you should carry what makes you feel comfortable out on the trail. Hell, sometimes if I'm riding one of the smaller OHV parks, I take the chance and don't take any tools with me. That's just the result of a risk assessment that I made weighing the severity against the possibility of occurance.

Best of luck and have fun riding! :thumbsup:

trailhead2004

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I too, never bring tools. I am fastidious about maintaining my bike. I have never had a breakdown. I am well aware of my bikes condition and if the possibility of a worn part failing during a ride, I fix it before it fails. In my tail bag is a cell phone, my wallet (full of singles) and a nice sandwich.

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You guys should carry EZ Towels in your bags, they’re killer.

They start about the size of 4 Nickels stacked, but with a little water they turn into a super medium sized durable towel. They were used last weekend on a ride to soak up a bunch of blood from my buddies face after he smacked it into the windshield of his BMW after a poorly judged washout. They are also nice dunked in a cooler after a ride for a clean cold face wipe. The big camping retailers sell them, or you can get them online. www.upr.com/product.php?productid=715&cat=0&page=1

If you search EZ Towel on you-tube, you can see a demo.

I carry most if the basic tools mentioned, but I also have a small hair comb under my bar pad for cactus removal.

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:thumbsup:

In the rear fender bag..., spare clutch,

Am i the only one that saw that. Wow! I carry a lotof of the items you do but not that.

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Cheers all, thats great. Good information and suggestions here. :thumbsup:

Ill get out tommorrow to fill my tool bag so im allready for next week. :moon:

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One poster below said he does all his chain maintenance at home so he doesn't need to carry chain tools. I definitely disagree with that assessment. trailhead2004

for the last 25 years i've ridden between 5k and 10k dirt miles each and every year. i did not have one single chain failure during all those many thousands of miles until i started running the Primary Drive junk chain. i thought it was just a string of bad luck until a friend munched his cases $3k with the same chain.

i had began carrying a chain breaker but went back to a quality chain and dropped the breaker from my "normal" tools. if i were to go out with someone running a Primary Drive chain, i think i'd throw the breaker in if that rider didn't have one.

i also carry a spare spark plug AND A PLUG WRENCH

and i also carry my global star sat phone when riding alone. that reduces the tool load somewhat. i can just call a triple a tow truck.

__________________

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