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WR450FGreg

Protect your rear links from water and mud a little better

2 posts in this topic

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After seeing shots of damaged/rusted rear end bearings in posts in the past I came up with this simple guard to protect my links.

The stock item doesn't cover the links at all really.

This one was made from 1mm insertion rubber and covers all of the links as far as front-rear spraying mud/rocks/water goes.

It replaces the stock item and mounts in a similar way to the airbox, but with a strip of aluminium plate to give extra support.

It sits well clear of the back tyre and attaches to the back of the bashplate.

I've run it for a few rides now in rocky/muddy terrain with no problems.

I'm sure it will eventually be torn by a sharp rock ledge, but it can easily be replaced if damaged too much.

NB. This doesn't mean I'll never need to re-grease my bearings. But, it does mean I'll have to do it a lot less than before.

wr450f_rear_links_guard.jpg

It could just as easily be made from old heavy duty inner tube.

For those guys without an aluminium bashplate I'm sure it could be tied to the frame/links with cable ties or something. You'd need to keep an eye on them though, they'd get broken easily. Maybe carry spares.

Greg

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That is very cool!!!

Just to point out something - in most cases, it's NOT the trail that tears up the linkage bearings, it's the maintenance.

Those who use a pressure washer to clean off embedded mud and grime from the bearing seal areas are the ones that have the rotten bearings, those that use simple green and a scrub brush and rinse with a hose or use a pressure washer from afar tend to have bearings that last a LOT longer between maintenance intervals.

That said - I think the "mudflap" will help to a degree by keeping mud and clay from completely encompassing the rear linkage if you go through a nice deep soft mudhole by letting it glide over the soft base instead of grinding the linkage into the soft base, in effect keeping it cleaner through your worst case scenario where most WILL get the pressure washer involved.

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