Fork seal replacement?

face plant,

Is there anywhere online where those Yamaha tech updates can be accessed?

I've searched and came up with nothing.

Cheers,

Greg

here you go. Step by step.

Finally got time to replace the fork seals today. Disassembled, cleaned, etc. as per instructions posted at thumperfaq and dirtbikeworld.net. Made a poorman's seal driver out of a 2" pvc coupling, cut lengthwise with a hack saw.

When I was trying to install the new seals, I was having trouble driving the oils seal in far enough. I am just using one-half of the pvc pipe (not both halves together. When I tap the seal in on one side, the ohter side just lifts up. I just go back and forth. :lame:

The especially hard part is that I am doing this while holding the inner fork leg, so that it doesn't fall down into the outer leg. I'm tapping on my pvc tool with a plastic mallet, so as not to damage the tube.

So I am wondering, what is my error?

- did I not drive the slide metal in far enough?

- Should I use a piece of pipe under the outer tube to hold the inner tube up?

- should I use both halves of the PVC at the same time?

- should I not quit my day job to take up motorcycle repair--aw never mind, that one is an obvious "yeah"

I did my disassembly very deliberately, with notes, so I am 100% certain that everything is going back in the right order, including the seal washer (which on the 2006 has to be installed with the protrusions up (as in away from the axle).

Thanks for any advice.

OK...

The metal bushings that you drove in before should go in until they stop. (I hope they're straight)

Look at the wear spots (presuming they are the old ones) and estimate how far you think they need to go, and knock them in until they bottom out.

You really shouldn't need a hammer to accomplish this or the seal installation.

On the other side, I know it's a bit more expensive, but I use the right tool to do this from either MP or RaceTech. Since you don't have it, I can't see anyway you could get it in with using only one half of your pipe contraption. What I do, is ever so slightly, put a VERY thin film of lube on the seal, then with arm/hand pressure, in a downward tapping motion, tap them in until they stop.

By using only one half of the pipe, presuming it is the right size, how could you be sure that you are completely lined up with the recess that the seal goes in. I certainly hope the plastic pipe your using is deburred so not to damage the seal.

PM me if you need some more assistance.

I had no trouble using a 2" coupler, I split it in half and heated it until soft and held it on the inner tube until cooled, it fit perfectly between the inner and outer tubes. careful light taps with my hammer, moving it around the tube constantly did the trick for me. it worked on both the bushing and the seal, $27 for MSR seals delivered from E-bay, $16 for Honda 5wt fork oil and $2 for the coupler.........I am happy and proud of myself, easy and quick I will change the oil frequently now that I know how easy it is

So I am wondering, what is my error?

- did I not drive the slide metal in far enough?

- Should I use a piece of pipe under the outer tube to hold the inner tube up?

.

I would say Yes and Yes.

I had the same problem as I didn't get the slide on far enough.

I used the handle from a toilet plunger to hold up the inner tube. It was just about the right length.

'06 WR450 fork seals are leaking like a seive.

So my local dealer quoted me $170 labor (plus parts) to change 'em--one hour labor per fork? And that's if I pull the forks off the bike and bring 'em in. I can't believe they need that much time to replace seals. What do you guys think is a fair price for that work?

Anyone want to suggest a good/conscientious/fair mechanic in the south Orange County area?

I went to Pro Tech in Temecula and they quoted me $80 plus parts. So maybe $120 when all said and done. He even noticed from maybe from my weight.......:lame: that maybe it needs to be re-valved? for $150.

As soon as I'm ready, I'm going to Pro Tech:ride:

I just did my first fork seal change EVER about a month ago. It took me about an hour for the first fork (yeah I kept going back to the vid and manual to make sure I wasn't messing up:)) and about 20 minutes to do the second. Really easy stuff! I'll never send that work out again. I did buy all the specialty tools before I did the job and they made it really easy to do.

I did exactly the same as you about 4 weeks ago also. First one took some time and constantly refered to the video. 2nd one I did from memory in about 15 minutes.

2 points: Make sure you have something to drive the seals, I used pvc pipe but I am sure a proper seal driver would be ideal. Also make sure you have a ruler with some thin plastic pipe attached to it with a syringe on the end. I didn't and I had to fart arse around to get the levels right in each leg.

I went to Pro Tech in Temecula and they quoted me $80 plus parts. So maybe $120 when all said and done. He even noticed from maybe from my weight.......:lame: that maybe it needs to be re-valved? for $150.

As soon as I'm ready, I'm going to Pro Tech:ride:

So dropped off my forks at Pro Tec this morning. $140 for new seals installed.

Still not a bad price...... But need to get new FATBOY springs soon......

Do these bushings look like they need to be replaced? This fork ws NOT leaking. If I order new bushings, it will probably be another week, and I have an enduro on the 25th. If I install the new oil and dust seal, will I harm them if I continue to use these bushings?

 

 

 

photo7_zpsb698414b.jpgphoto8_zpsa6c8e4ce.jpg

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Do these bushings look like they need to be replaced? This fork ws NOT leaking. If I order new bushings, it will probably be another week, and I have an enduro on the 25th. If I install the new oil and dust seal, will I harm them if I continue to use these bushings?

 

 

 

photo7_zpsb698414b.jpgphoto8_zpsa6c8e4ce.jpg

photo9_zps80d74b06.jpg

 

 

The black coating (teflon i believe) is what counts. As long as you dont see noticeable wear where the coating is gone then if it wasnt leaking before im sure your good till however long your going to use them. By all rights you should change them though. 

The black coating (teflon i believe) is what counts. As long as you dont see noticeable wear where the coating is gone then if it wasnt leaking before im sure your good till however long your going to use them. By all rights you should change them though. 

Just sealed everythign up, and now both sides are leaking, although very minimally. (Before it was just the brake side fork). 

Just sealed everythign up, and now both sides are leaking, although very minimally. (Before it was just the brake side fork). 

 

Even If they were bad I dont think both forks should be leaking this fast. Might it just be some excess from assembly? 

Even If they were bad I dont think both forks should be leaking this fast. Might it just be some excess from assembly? 

 

i tried it with the space between the inner and outer forks dry, (no oil), and there was still too much to be comfortable with.

Did you use the PVC forks seal driver or an official seal one... The reason in saying this, my first try at this with the PVC. I had one fork seal still leak. I tried it again and still leaked. I ordered new seals and a seal driver and that resolved my problem. It was worth the 26.00 for the seal driver. The PVC method works, but I couldn't get the right size to effectively do it right for me.

Did you use the PVC forks seal driver or an official seal one... The reason in saying this, my first try at this with the PVC. I had one fork seal still leak. I tried it again and still leaked. I ordered new seals and a seal driver and that resolved my problem. It was worth the 26.00 for the seal driver. The PVC method works, but I couldn't get the right size to effectively do it right for me.

I've been using the PVC. I think I got the seal in there pretty good. The clip was seated comfortably.

the seals hardly ever wear out

Its usually a bit of grit trapped between the seal lip and the stanchion

The motion pro seal mate tool sorts the problem - I changed my seals twice before discovering this tool. I've not changed them since, and I've succesfully stopped my seals from leaking about 5 times now by using the tool.

 

http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/partno/08-0395/

 

the seals hardly ever wear out

Its usually a bit of grit trapped between the seal lip and the stanchion

The motion pro seal mate tool sorts the problem - I changed my seals twice before discovering this tool. I've not changed them since, and I've succesfully stopped my seals from leaking about 5 times now by using the tool.

 

http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/partno/08-0395/

 

 

I've done something very similar using a tear off...worked in the past but not now for some reason.  Also, is there some reason why bikes used to have the black accordion-style fork protectors and now its just a piece of plastic covering the front?  my forks have a ding on the back/inner side....

I've done something very similar using a tear off...worked in the past but not now for some reason.  Also, is there some reason why bikes used to have the black accordion-style fork protectors and now its just a piece of plastic covering the front?  my forks have a ding on the back/inner side....

I tried it with a feeler gauge first with limited success, before I bought the motion pro tool

dunno if a tear off is strong enough, but its the hook bit on the end which is important, as thats what enables you to pull the trapped grit down out of the seal

 

 

The black accordion thing was on right way up forks

They would not offer enough proctection on USD forks from flying stones etc, coz the chrome stanchion bit  is lower down, hence why USD's have the hard plastic guard

Edited by GuyGraham

I tried it with a feeler gauge first with limited success, before I bought the motion pro tool

dunno if a tear off is strong enough, but its the hook bit on the end which is important, as thats what enables you to pull the trapped grit down out of the seal

 

 

The black accordion thing was on right way up forks

They would not offer enough proctection on USD forks from flying stones etc, coz the chrome stanchion bit  is lower down, hence why USD's have the hard plastic guard

thanks for the info, guygraham, but i was specifically referring to the backside of the innertube of the forks (where my pitting is). i feel as if the rubber boots on my old bikes would have prevented this.

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