Why are there so many threads concerning trans issues

I am new to TT and have been reading the yamaha 400,426,450 forums and have noticed alot of questions and problems related to the yz 4 stroke trannys. I currently own a 2001 yz 426 and have had no problems with it. :ride: So whats the deal with all these posts, is it just a matter of time before all 4 strokes have trans problems. I change oil and filter after every ride with part synthetic, I mostly do trail riding, and some personal small track riding. Can any one help me out on this question:confused:

Yep the problem is they are made of metal. Even the space shuttle breaks from time to time. I would venture thought that Yamaha has a better track record.

BTW....seriously people....changing the oil EVERY ride? The book says every 600 miles. I swear, people do this because its basically all they know how to do to their motor. If you motor is going to grenade changing the oil fanatically or not didn't have much to do with it.

Your bike will eventually break, it is going to cost you money to fix it. And guess what? Its all fixable.....RELAX people. Just remember, your car cost a whole lot more than your bike, do you even put a tenth of the Maintenance efforts in to it. My Toyota is still running fine!

The only reason you hear about issues on these older Yammis is because they're the only 10 year old thumpers still in existence - I haven't seen any Honda's around lately that are that old and running....

Your bike will eventually break, it is going to cost you money to fix it. And guess what? Its all fixable.....RELAX people.

is that fixable?

P5090014.jpg

Yes, actually it is.

MVrider first of all what does MVrider stand for? secondly thanks for the reply. You dont think changing the oil after every ride is a good idea? seems to me the cleaner the oil the better, Mabe Im wrong

is that fixable?

P5090014.jpg

Of course it is. The only question is whether it's feasible.

The trans threads are nearly always concerning one of the few "real" issues with the YZF, and that is wear at the locking lugs or dogs on the sides of the gears that lock the trans into the 4 or 5 different gears when selected. I believe this happens in part because the YZF's up to '06 shift a little more stiffly than say Hondas, and so are more prone to suffering sloppy shifts and excess engagement grinding if a rider gets a little bit lazy with the gear changes.

Either way, what normally happens is that the lugs, which are originally made with slight undercut so that they hold in gear under a load, wear to the point that they start forcing themselves out of gear instead. Eventually, this bends the shift fork and makes matters worse.

Whether yours will ever do it depends on how the bike was treated before you, and on how you treat it. Make your shifts cleanly and sharply, and it will take a lot longer to wear out the lugs.

BTW....seriously people....changing the oil EVERY ride? The book says every 600 miles.

Depends on the oil you use. A few oils that are actually capable of retaining their viscosity over time when subjected to use as a gear lube can be changed every third or fourth ride, or at about 7-10 hours.

But far too many of them, even popular premium automotive and C grade oils, and supposed motorcycle specialty oils, won't hold up. The shearing action of the transmission converts a lot of them from 15w-40 to 15w-20 in as little as two hours or less. Seen it happen.

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?p=2685432#post2685432

So why is mv rider saying change oil every 600 miles, because the manual says so, am I wrong in thinking every ride is a good thing

I doesn't hurt anything except your wallet if you do this with an oil that doesn't require it, but it's kind of a waste if you aren't.

What are you using?

Where in OR are you GrassyFlats426? I'm down south in Lakeview, if you're close we should try to get together for a ride sometime.

I Live in Yamhill about 40 miles south of Portland. Do most of my riding at friends personal tracks, and Grassy Flats ohv park. Where do you ride?

I am using Castrol actevo extra t4

I am using Castrol actevo extra t4

In that case, you can do one of three things:

> Assume that Actevo T4 is no better than Castrol GPS is, and continue to change it every ride.

> Have a used oil sample tested to determine if it's retaining its viscosity or not.

> Switch to an oil that has shown it can hold up longer.

I Live in Yamhill about 40 miles south of Portland. Do most of my riding at friends personal tracks, and Grassy Flats ohv park. Where do you ride?

I haven't done much riding down here (just moved here a year ago)- don't know anyone who rides and I don't like going by myself a whole lot.

Of course it is. The only question is whether it's feasible.

The trans threads are nearly always concerning one of the few "real" issues with the YZF, and that is wear at the locking lugs or dogs on the sides of the gears that lock the trans into the 4 or 5 different gears when selected. I believe this happens in part because the YZF's up to '06 shift a little more stiffly than say Hondas, and so are more prone to suffering sloppy shifts and excess engagement grinding if a rider gets a little bit lazy with the gear changes.

Either way, what normally happens is that the lugs, which are originally made with slight undercut so that they hold in gear under a load, wear to the point that they start forcing themselves out of gear instead. Eventually, this bends the shift fork and makes matters worse.

Whether yours will ever do it depends on how the bike was treated before you, and on how you treat it. Make your shifts cleanly and sharply, and it will take a lot longer to wear out the lugs.

I have had same problem with my CRF450's and while i almost never miss shifts there is always debris in my gear oil

Its kind of like filling your car with gas every time you go some where. you would of made it on the gas you had but just to be safe you fill up. I change mine every 3 times I ride. The engine runs great but I stripped the oil drain bolt and had to get a hcoil put in to fix it. The bikes are bullet proof unless I am working on it. less is sometimes more.

All bikes, regardless of make, age, or maintenance will eventually break.

Your maintenance schedule and riding habits will contribute greatly to your bike having a long life, with few major problems - or needing a complete rebuild every year.

As Gray stated, which oil you use can be more important than how often you change it.

Metal shavings in tranny oil is fairly common, more so with a new tranny as the gears mesh together for the first time. But, even my '00 426, which is still running very strong, always has a little bit of "glitter" in the oil when I change it.

I run whatever I can get a good deal on at Schucks Auto supply and change my oil every three weekends during riding season. May not be the ideal solution, but I am old and slow enough that I don't abuse my machines anymore (my bones can't take it), but it works for me.

YMMV.

As Gray stated, which oil you use can be more important than how often you change it.

That's not precisely what I said..

A closer summary would be, "which oil you use will determine how often you should change it."

Changing often can negate a great many shortcomings in an oil.

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