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Twistedtrik

Waterpump seals. (Yes i searched )

7 posts in this topic

So I need to replace my seals, I have the seals here and the shaft is on it's way to me. Like an R-tard I pulled the seals out and forgot which direction they go back in. The manual isn't very clear on this and i really need to know. It seems that I remember 1 of them having the flat side facing out of the seal hole and 1 faced in. Thanks in advance.

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The general rule is that the numbers on the seal face the installer after they are in place. Usually, seals are made so that they comply with this. But let's think about what needs to be accomplished here. The engine oil has to be kept in the primary case, so looking at the seal, the major oil retaining lip of the seal must face in, toward the oil it seals against. Likewise, the coolant needs to be sealed into the water pump cavity, so again, the seal lip must face out toward the fluid it seals.

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If that is where the numbers are, then both flat sides would face each other (one in, one out). Looking at it from the perspective of the installer, in both cases, the lip faces up, and the flat side down.

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that makes the most sense from a fluid retention point of view.

thinking about it from a logical approach, it also makes complete sense, seals usually face with the flat/printed side OUT, looking at the water pump/case cover, the weep hole cavity is essentially the outside for both the water pump and the case (even though it's sandwiched between the two).

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Well of course it makes sense now LOL. Trust me, I am no rookie in the mechanics field. Been ASE certified for 12 yrs. I do all of my own work (unless warranty covers it ) but going on common sense it would tell me I should be looking at the flat side of the seal when it goes in. Either way I have them in correctly and am just waiting for my impeller shaft and timing chain guide so I can put it all back together.

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