Very stupid question, but what way do you tighten spokes?

Hey guys, I know I will get a ton of crap for:banghead: this but which way do you tighten spokes? I'm talking about if you were sitting directly behind your rear wheel, would you use the regualr righty tighty, or lefty loosy? I have spline drives spokes and RAD nipples and they never really loosened before. I also have had my dealer do tire changes so I never really had to check. They did it for me. I just dont want to strip the spokes. Any help will be greatly appreciated! Thanks!:bonk::prof::confused:

Hey guys, I know I will get a ton of crap for:banghead: this but which way do you tighten spokes? I'm talking about if you were sitting directly behind your rear wheel, would you use the regualr righty tighty, or lefty loosy? I have spline drives spokes and RAD nipples and they never really loosened before. I also have had my dealer do tire changes so I never really had to check. They did it for me. I just dont want to strip the spokes. Any help will be greatly appreciated! Thanks!:bonk::prof::confused:

If your sitting behind the rim, you'll want to start at the top and bring the wrench down. Imagine that the tire is off the rim and your screwing the nipple on the spoke, just like any other bolt. (righty tighty, lefty loosy) Hope that makes sense.

So if you were sitting behind the tire, you would be tightening the opposite way then, right? LOL, I feel metally challenged!:prof::bonk:

If you could look through the tire, the nipple will be like a nut on the spoke. Turn it clockwise (if you were looking through the tire at the end of the spoke) to tighten it.

Right side of the wheel, push the spoke wrench away from you, left side of the wheel, pull it towards you. It will be obvious when you do it as the level of effort will go up if tightening and down if loosening.

Right side of the wheel, push the spoke wrench away from you, left side of the wheel, pull it towards you. It will be obvious when you do it as the level of effort will go up if tightening and down if loosening.

Thanks! Makes much more scense to me. I really feel quite dumb right now, but this is something that I have never really thought of before...and I have heard some preety gnarly stories about over tightening spokes and such. Thanks KJ790 and everyone who responded!:prof:

Thanks KJ790 and everyone who responded!:prof:
...and to those who didn't reply, as well. :bonk:

'tighten" may not be the best descriptive, think "snug". 1 or 2 fingers on a short spoke wrench. Don't hit every one in order go around check every 4th or 5th (which ever will alternate sides). I like to hit the threads and the spoke seat (rim side) with wd40 before hand, and check run out before to see if I need to tweak one way or the other.

imagine the spoke as being any other standard thread bolt. should be easy to visualize that way.

Not a silly question. A very good question. Just make sure you dont over tighten. Invest in a torque wrench for the spokes.

My hat off to you, it took B_LLS to ask that question. Good luck

Just remember, you'll never know something if you dont ask.

The fact that there are already over 100 views to your question in one day validates it...

I know which way to turn my spokes, but I am always worried I will knock the tire out of true.

Not a silly question. A very good question. Just make sure you dont over tighten. Invest in a torque wrench for the spokes.

My hat off to you, it took B_LLS to ask that question. Good luck

Just remember, you'll never know something if you dont ask.

I've never understood the torque wrench tightening of spokes. I can see how it works for brand new spokes. But once they get a little dirty or begin oxidizing or even just a little gulling up from tightening them, the torque value goes out the door. Most of your torque is lost in the friction of the tread and doesn't really relate to how tight the spoke is.

I still use the old sound of the spokes to judge if they are equally tightened.

Does this make sense? Or am I missing something.

CB

I know which way to turn my spokes, but I am always worried I will knock the tire out of true.

Tighten every third spoke and you shouldn't have a problem.

Tighten every third spoke and you shouldn't have a problem.

When you are done tightening every third, do you start over on the ones you missed and repeat every third again till all have been tightened?

When you are done tightening every third, do you start over on the ones you missed and repeat every third again till all have been tightened?

Thats how I do it. Do every third, skip one and do every third again. Keep up the process until you've tightened every spoke.

I've never understood the torque wrench tightening of spokes. I can see how it works for brand new spokes. But once they get a little dirty or begin oxidizing or even just a little gulling up from tightening them, the torque value goes out the door. Most of your torque is lost in the friction of the tread and doesn't really relate to how tight the spoke is.

I still use the old sound of the spokes to judge if they are equally tightened.

Does this make sense? Or am I missing something.

CB

Does to me.

Tap the spoke and listen to the ring. Now turn it...and tap it again...If the pitch goes higher then you're tightening it....lower - looser...In the end, they should all have the same note.

Tighten every third spoke 'til you got them all ,and then check them again. Tap the spoke and listen ...make all the notes the same.

Tap the spoke and listen ...make all the notes the same.

This is what I've always done...But never really know if the tune I set them all to is actually close to the correct torque...

Isn't it much more important to have the tension distributed equal, than having dead on torque anyway? Or are both equally important?

I'm glad I'm not the only one pondering this question....thanks guys!:prof:

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