2006 YZ450f Zerk fittings?

Has anyone ever installed zerk fittings on the rear swingarm for the pivot bolt and the linkage. It looks like i have a seized up pivot bolt. I tried beating the thing out and its not moving. I sprayed the hell out of it last night with wd40 to soak in, im going to try to use my air hammer to push it out tonight. In the future i would like to be able to have some zrks to grease it and the linkage. Does anyone make bolts with zerks on them? anyone have any suggestions on removel also?

Zerks although good idea in theory never took off for this function on MX specific bikes. I guess the point is that these are areas that must be maintained over time. Zerks could only get grease to certain areas of the bearings thus not really achieving what the manufacturers want you and I to do....the old manual method.

Properly located zerks would feed grease to the bearings. The swing arm bolt sticks, not at the bearings, but to the crankcase sleeves and bearing inner races, both of which would be sealed away from any such grease. Wouldn't solve the problem, I'm afraid.

I was wondering if i drilled a small pilot hole on the back side of the case over the swingarm bolt and shot some wd40 in there to loosen it up and just used some rtv silicone to seal it up would it hurt anything

Might want to lay the bike on it's side and let gravity pull some Blaster or other penetrating oil down into the seized areas, keep reapplying for a day or so and then use a soft punch and big mallet

As TooFast said, you should use some penetrating oil instead of WD-40. WD-40 is not the best penetrating oil. AeroKroil, PB Blaster, etc will work much better.

I could see zerks getting torn off or beaten unusable on rough terrain

I could see zerks getting torn off or beaten unusable on rough terrain

It would all depend on how and where they were installed. If they came from the factory with the fittings, you could bet that they would be serviceable.

The bigger problem is getting the holes drilled and zerks installed where they will actually get the grease to the bearings, without interferring with the normal linkage operation. Not impossible, but definitely requires some thought.

Properly located zerks would feed grease to the bearings. The swing arm bolt sticks, not at the bearings, but to the crankcase sleeves and bearing inner races, both of which would be sealed away from any such grease. Wouldn't solve the problem, I'm afraid.

Gray, I hate that you read the post before replying. :prof:

I think the manual indicates that many such bolts need to be greased to prevent seizing. I found that my son's '07 250F had no such grease on the axles, pivot bolts, etc when new. As many suggest when the bike is new, I took the linkage apart, pulled all the bearings and repacked them and lubricated the bolts and axles. My new '08 YZ250-smoker had dry parts in it as well.

Brent

It would all depend on how and where they were installed. If they came from the factory with the fittings, you could bet that they would be serviceable.

The bigger problem is getting the holes drilled and zerks installed where they will actually get the grease to the bearings, without interferring with the normal linkage operation. Not impossible, but definitely requires some thought.

Defintley ..I guess what I meant is that if you can get grease gun on it without too much screwing around a rock or root will find it too,but hey I hope we can come up with something to make maintainance a little easier.

Defintley ..I guess what I meant is that if you can get grease gun on it without too much screwing around a rock or root will find it too,but hey I hope we can come up with something to make maintainance a little easier.

it would be easier if all of the bearings were done right from the factory or better yet installed with Ceramic Sealed Bearings. These are the ticket :prof:

I would love if they came with grease fittings

That would save so much time

It's like vehicles today its all about replacement not maintainance

Zerks would make it easier for getting a shot of grease in there before every ride. But you would be hard pressed to know if you a getting complete coverage.

Disassembly, cleaning, inspection and reinstalling the bearings while torquing everything to the correct values will greatly increase bearing life, and improve the safety and performance of your ride.

Some maintenance is just a little more time consuming. I think doing the linkage and swingarm bearing a couple times a year is not that big a deal. Bike is apart for a few week nights and I know that everything is clean and ready when done.

I have thought for years about modifying your typical MX linkage to accept zerks. The problem being to effectively allow grease to flow from a zerk, to the inner bearings and bolts, you would need to "cross drill" all the sleeve bushings. These sleeve bushings are almost always made from "case hardened" steel which is extremely hard to machine unless you have expensive solid carbide tooling.

I have thought for years about modifying your typical MX linkage to accept zerks. The problem being to effectively allow grease to flow from a zerk, to the inner bearings and bolts, you would need to "cross drill" all the sleeve bushings. These sleeve bushings are almost always made from "case hardened" steel which is extremely hard to machine unless you have expensive solid carbide tooling.
Not necessarily. In several places in the linkage, there are two bearings, usually with a small space between them. The Zerk could be brought in from the outside, and located so the grease flowed into this gap.

Bringing the grease in though the bolts from the inside is even more complicated than you stated, because unless the inner race sleeves are assembled with the holes aligned (extremely tricky), there would need to be a groove cut either on the bolt (not a good idea) or in the inside of the sleeve (very difficult) to insure grease could make it from the bolt to the actual bearings.

TiN coated drill bits are far cheaper than carbide, and can drill through some very hard stuff.

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