Changing tubes in the trails ?

First I want say hello to everyone, I've learned alot from all the post and really enjoy this site.

So I was riding my 650L about 30 miles from home and got a flat, rode it back home slow. On the way home I was thinking that I have never read anything about how to change a tube in the trail. Is there a tool for the right side of the bike , so the axle can be removed and tube changed or what other ways can it be done ?

Sorry if is a stupid question but, I want to keep riding. Like on my mountain bike change it and keep going. Also should I put a rim lock?

A rim lock is a real good idea. It really helps keep the tire on the rim.

As far a changing on the trail, it is just like changing a tire or tube at home. the missing thing is a stand for the bike. If nothing can be found to lift the bike on to, just turn off the gas and lay it over. Take off the wheel and use tire irons to get one side of the tire off the rim. Replace the tube and put it all back together. I've done this about ten times over the years. It really helps if you are good at changing a tire when at home. I can do the job in 15 to 20 minutes.

When you put the wheel down in the dirt to start working on it, be sure to put something to keep dirt from getting into the axle area. Bearings don't like dirt. Guess how I know?

I though about laying the bike on the ground but , I also though it wouldn't start when I turn it up again and if gas was going to leak from the tank cap.

When I got home it took me like 45 minutes to change it, the hardest part was putting the valve stem in and keeping my knuckles and fingers in one piece, it was twight.

Thanx for the info cleonard

i've changed a few of my own and several for others. i've propped my bike up on rocks, old tires, a tall curb, and another bike.

like cleonard said, rim locks are good to get you home. i wrap my spare tube in a cloth, and put the cloth on the ground to keep the rim out of the dirt. other then that, it's just like home!

This is probably a stupid thing to say, without a doubt, the next time I go riding I'll get a flat for saying this(knocking on wood right now). I do alot of high speed riding in the Ice House region of California, which is alot like the desert, very rocky, only at 5000ft. At any rate, I used to get flats all the time with the rocky terrain that exists in that area. I got tired of changing tubes and went to the heaviest tube I could get, Moose Ultra Heavy Duty, and then I fill them with automotive slime. It's been 3 year since I've had a flat since I started using that combination. I go through 4-5 rear tires a year and 2-3 front tires, and all I do is change the tubes front and rear, once a year and I'm golden. Certainly doesn't gaurentee you against flats, but has made my life much better.

Thanx for the tips.

The more tips you guys give me the better because some of the places to ride here in South Florida are like waste lands. You know washing machines, tires, construction debre, I knew a flat was coming but I didn't think it was going to be 30 miles from home.

I would put a rimlock on. If you have a flat and do not have a tube, you can use zip ties around the rim/tire to keep the tire on to get home

That one didn't even cross my mind.

thanx

I would put a rimlock on. If you have a flat and do not have a tube, you can use zip ties around the rim/tire to keep the tire on to get home

Thats a great tip bum!

So what size tire irons is everone carrying on the trail and how many?

8", 12"...:smirk:

2 or 3?

A rim lock is a real good idea. It really helps keep the tire on the rim.

As far a changing on the trail, it is just like changing a tire or tube at home. the missing thing is a stand for the bike. If nothing can be found to lift the bike on to, just turn off the gas and lay it over. Take off the wheel and use tire irons to get one side of the tire off the rim. Replace the tube and put it all back together. I've done this about ten times over the years. It really helps if you are good at changing a tire when at home. I can do the job in 15 to 20 minutes.

When you put the wheel down in the dirt to start working on it, be sure to put something to keep dirt from getting into the axle area. Bearings don't like dirt. Guess how I know?

You could patch a tube without removing the wheel from the bike.

So what size tire irons is everone carrying on the trail and how many?

8", 12"...:smirk:

2 or 3?

i carry two 12" ones, but always use a third from a buddy when doing tires.

You could patch a tube without removing the wheel from the bike.

good tip. i've had too much bad luck with patches (probably operator error) so i just change the tube.

i carry two 12" ones, but always use a third from a buddy when doing tires.

good tip. i've had too much bad luck with patches (probably operator error) so i just change the tube.

Thanks for the info. :) I have been carrying 2x12" and one 8". I have wanted to practice field changes but already have a problem with scratching the crap out of the rim when in the garage with any tool needed at hand. Primarily why I would never pay extra for black rims....I'm not good enough to not scratch them when forking on new tires. :smirk:

I only carry 1 and a crescent wrench to undo the axle nut.

When I change tires at home I usually only use a 10 inch single tire iron and a 8 inch crescent wrench as the second. I do all the levering with the tire iron and use the non wrench end of the crescent to hold the tire in place while I take the next bite. I can do a Desert IT this way. If it's a real bitch I might break down and use two tire irons. That way I'm ready out on the trail. With tires it's all experience and technique. Well that and a lot of weight and strength.

I carry a ultra heavy duty FRONT tube. You can put a front tube in the back tire, but you can't put a back tube in the front tire.( unless your a 100 miles from home, anything might have to work) I carry 2 - 8" tire irons, plus a long screwdriver in my tool bag. I have a CO2 inflator with extra bottles, a small bottle of dish soap to make the tire slide and seat easier and a tire guage.

First I want say hello to everyone, I've learned alot from all the post and really enjoy this site.

So I was riding my 650L about 30 miles from home and got a flat, rode it back home slow. On the way home I was thinking that I have never read anything about how to change a tube in the trail. Is there a tool for the right side of the bike , so the axle can be removed and tube changed or what other ways can it be done ?

Sorry if is a stupid question but, I want to keep riding. Like on my mountain bike change it and keep going. Also should I put a rim lock?

Simple fix go TUbliss, see this at http://www.niksindustries.com and click on TUbliss for the lowdown. The wave of the future. No hassles, get a flat and ridr home. $100 a wheel for the product, but well worth it. :smirk:

Can't patch a pinch flat. I haven't gotten a thorn hole in a motorcycle tire.

Best bet, carry a spare if you are by yourself or don't want to ride on a flat.

Carry a cell phone, might come in handy and can't hurt. Two 8 inch iron, practice using them. I use a 12 inch and two 8's at home. I have changed enough tires to know how to do it. Once I was comfortable, I said screw it and pay the $12 bucks to have the motoshop do it. I have a black rim on my KTM, don't be afraid of scratching it, it is a dirt bike for crips sakes, besides, black sharpie pens are a perfect match and cover scratches easily.

So what size tire irons is everone carrying on the trail and how many?

8", 12"...:smirk:

2 or 3?

I carry three 8 inchers.

Also, a good alternative to a bike stand is a good size rock:thumbsup:

I

the hardest part was putting the valve stem in and keeping my knuckles and fingers in one piece, it was twight.

I feel your pain, bruised knuckles suck! :smirk: I bought a few of these to share with riding buddies. I've not tried it yet.

http://www.motosport.com/offroad/product/HP-TOOLS-AIR-VALVE-PULLER/?prodId=852395&sMMY=&cat0=

I use HD tubes, slime, and have ran as much as 32psi when I got a pinch flat running 26 in an IRC. :ride: Right now I've got a rally raid front, it's so stiff I don't think it matters if it's inflated or not.:)

I carry fix-a-flat,front and rear tubes, two 9" tire irons and a tool roll. I've used rocks, stumps, logs, parking barricade, and a cooler to prop the bike up to change a tube. I never try to patch a tube trailside. I like hot patches but don't want to haul those on the bike.

You could patch a tube without removing the wheel from the bike.

No offense, but that sounds like a nightmare. Getting the rear tire off is hard enough as is...but doing it with the wheel still in the frame...yikes!

I love patches and will always patch first....the new tube is saved for critical failures that patches cant handle (ie valve stem damage)... you dont need anything fancy, I use bicycle patch kits and have never had a problem with patch failure...its all in the technique.

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