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Wes Woodin

BEST manufacturer of Titanium bolts & Axles

21 posts in this topic

I wanting to invest in some TI axles and bolts. Who has had the best luck with the selection out there and what would you recommend? :banghead:

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Mettec has most bolts, axles and hardware for most mx bikes. They are in Nevada....

Yeah, they are the biggest and from what I've they are the best, however they're must be some other companies out there that manufacture. Maybe not as expensive.

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If your looking to get the most value out of TI, only replace the bolts that contribute to unsprung weight. Those are the money bolts that would most likely make the biggest improvement.

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i've got alot of mettecs stuff on my 05. quality is 1st rate. i was worried about axle wear but they are actually wearing better than the stock ones:thumbsup: i also agree about the unsprung weight being the most important;i use the axles,axle nut,linkage bolts,front pinch bolts,rotor bolts,sprocket bolts/nuts,aluminum banjo fittings, i didn't do the swingarm bolt as its low sprung weight;but i did break down and get the motor mount bolts and bar mount bolts as they are high on the cog. does it make any difference? every little bit helps:prof:

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The linkage bolts were a good bet based on their size alone. Titanium weighs 57% of what steel does (on average), and has significantly higher tensile strength.

But the linkage bolts are not unsprung. On a swing arm, only the 50% of the weight at the axle end is unsprung.

The wheel is obviously unsprung, and as you accurately stated, the swing arm bolt is unsprung. Everything between those two points is kind of in between, partly sprung, and partly unsprung. The shortcut way this is dealt with is to simply say that the rear half is unsprung, and the front half sprung. Or, you could calculate the ratio of sprung/unsprung weight of a specific component, like the relay arm, by it's relative position on the swing arm (i.e., 30% toward the rear = 70% sprung weight) and be fairly accurate.

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The linkage bolts were a good bet based on their size alone. Titanium weighs 57% of what steel does (on average), and has significantly higher tensile strength.

But the linkage bolts are not unsprung. On a swing arm, only the 50% of the weight at the axle end is unsprung.

The wheel is obviously unsprung, and as you accurately stated, the swing arm bolt is unsprung. Everything between those two points is kind of in between, partly sprung, and partly unsprung. The shortcut way this is dealt with is to simply say that the rear half is unsprung, and the front half sprung. Or, you could calculate the ratio of sprung/unsprung weight of a specific component, like the relay arm, by it's relative position on the swing arm (i.e., 30% toward the rear = 70% sprung weight) and be fairly accurate.

So do think the best bolts are the largest, due to the size and weight, then sprockets and rotors, then linkage bolts?

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Isn't titanium a lot softer than steel and aluminum?
Softer than most treated steels, but much harder than aluminum.

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So do think the best bolts are the largest, due to the size and weight, then sprockets and rotors, then linkage bolts?
Yes on the size question, because of the bang/buck ratio. You also need to be sure, in the case of things like axles and linkage bolts, that the shear strength will be sufficient, especially long term, since these fasteners are loaded principally in shear, rather than tension. Also, weight reductions at the ends of the bike, or higher on the bike will be more effective overall in terms of handling than weight lost low and toward the middle.

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Mettec applies a hard coating called Quadralloy to their axles. They should last for several seasons of racing before showing any signs of wear to the bearing surfaces.

If you are looking to save some wieght the best bang for the buck right now are Nutech's tubliss tires. As much as 1.5 pounds per wheel. Only 99 bucks retail! Highly recommended by MXA.

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Mettec applies a hard coating called Quadralloy to their axles. They should last for several seasons of racing before showing any signs of wear to the bearing surfaces.

There are shear load bearing surfaces on an axle, but nothing ever actually turns directly on a YZ axle unless something goes very wrong. The hard coating will increase shear resistance, though.

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There are shear load bearing surfaces on an axle, but nothing ever actually turns directly on a YZ axle unless something goes very wrong. The hard coating will increase shear resistance, though.

Man, I would hate for an axle to break! Titanium does break when shocked hard, I've seen it. Kind of like taffy. Pull and stretch a charleston chew, hard to break, strike one on the corner of a counter and it will crack in half every time.

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There are shear load bearing surfaces on an axle, but nothing ever actually turns directly on a YZ axle unless something goes very wrong. The hard coating will increase shear resistance, though.

axles wear not from turning but from the pounding they take,if you look at a axle with many hours you'll see the impression into the surface that rests against the bearing and mostly only at the bottom sometimes the top;it just happens. this is the wear that the q-loy coating protects against and its that wear i'm not seeing(which i've seen plenty of on stock axles)

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I just love this stuff!:banghead:

Nothing better than when NC and Grey really get going:prof:

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axles wear not from turning but from the pounding they take,if you look at a axle with many hours you'll see the impression into the surface that rests against the bearing and mostly only at the bottom sometimes the top;it just happens. this is the wear that the q-loy coating protects against and its that wear i'm not seeing(which i've seen plenty of on stock axles)

That's pretty much what I was saying. As a general rule, ductile (soft) materials fail in shear, hard materials fail in tension. Titanium is pretty good against either, but is more susceptible to shear, unless hard coated as with Q-alloy.

The shear issue must be considered a major one with the shock linkage. While the shock of wheel impacts to these bolts are reduced somewhat by the number of joints between them and the wheel itself, the loads are amplified by the leverage disadvantage they work at, which is roughly 3:1. 700 pounds of load at the rear wheel is over a ton at the shock eyelets.

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That's pretty much what I was saying. As a general rule, ductile (soft) materials fail in shear, hard materials fail in tension. Titanium is pretty good against either, but is more susceptible to shear, unless hard coated as with Q-alloy.

The shear issue must be considered a major one with the shock linkage. While the shock of wheel impacts to these bolts are reduced somewhat by the number of joints between them and the wheel itself, the loads are amplified by the leverage disadvantage they work at, which is roughly 3:1. 700 pounds of load at the rear wheel is over a ton at the shock eyelets.

It would seem that Titanium is better for the axles and not the linkage.

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would that wear be called shear? i guess websters defines it as deviation so it fits,but i've always considered shear as the complete seperation off axis? actually i just rebuilt my linkage and after a whole season they show very little/or no wear either;this was comparing them to the stockers that were in for roughly the same amount of time(they were noticeably worn) i hope its not something thats gonna wear off and let go all at once....well i guess even if it does it looks like i'll get 2 yrs anyway(maybe more):banghead:

might have to look into that tubliss thing:ride:

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Man, I would hate for an axle to break! Titanium does break when shocked hard, I've seen it. Kind of like taffy. Pull and stretch a charleston chew, hard to break, strike one on the corner of a counter and it will crack in half every time.

i hope you didn't mean me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

try toffee with a double f and a double e!

regards

Taffy

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