tileman

Evans coolant?

31 posts in this topic

Does anyone have any experience with this product? Is it worth the money vs. Engine Ice? :thumbsup: It seems like a great product on the website; I would just like some input before I spend $40 for a gallon of it...

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Total waste of money. At this time of year cooling isn't much of a problem. Nothing transfers heat better than water so the best way to keep temps low in the summer is to run straight distilled water with a splash of Water Wetter. During the winter, conventional anti-freeze and water are perfectly fine.

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What makes you think you need something better then regular coolant? I run 50/50 water/motorcraft gold and add 3% BG cellulose fiber stop leak

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My DRZ400 used to boil over regular water/antifreeze in the summer on slow technical trails or on trail work days. I replaced it with evans coolant and never had another problem. My buddy also ran it in his KTM450 with the same excellent results. That being said, I wouldn't use it unless you are having boil over problems, if you spring a leak in the woods you can't just top it off with water.

If your system don't have any leaks, you will NEVER have to top off an evan's filled system.

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O.K. lets get this straight. Any coolant mixed with water is just there to raise the boiling point of the water. Evans is a waterless coolant so it has a higher boiling point. Regular automotive antifreeze like Peak antifreeze or any other brand has an average boiling point with a 50/50 mixture of 265 deg.. Evans NPG-R has a boiling point of 400 deg.. So yes it does work better than most brands. But do you need it? Maybe if you are having boil over problems. Some bikes like my Cannondale needs Evans. It's the only thing that keeps me from boiling over. Also NPG-R is a lifetime coolant, you don't need to change it, as long as your system stays intact. But who is going to save their coolant when you change out a piston or something.

So in a nutshell, Evans is good stuff but do you need it? Unless your boiling over, for the cost I would run Engine Ice if I could but Evans works wonders for my Cannondale.

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O.K. lets get this straight. Any coolant mixed with water is just there to raise the boiling point of the water. Evans is a waterless coolant so it has a higher boiling point. Regular automotive antifreeze like Peak antifreeze or any other brand has an average boiling point with a 50/50 mixture of 265 deg.. Evans NPG-R has a boiling point of 400 deg.. So yes it does work better than most brands. But do you need it? Maybe if you are having boil over problems. Some bikes like my Cannondale needs Evans. It's the only thing that keeps me from boiling over. Also NPG-R is a lifetime coolant, you don't need to change it, as long as your system stays intact. But who is going to save their coolant when you change out a piston or something.

So in a nutshell, Evans is good stuff but do you need it? Unless your boiling over, for the cost I would run Engine Ice if I could but Evans works wonders for my Cannondale.

Coolant is used to lower the freezing point(coolant itself freezes around 6 degrees and water at 32 but mixed can reach further then -40) and raise the boiling point, but the most important property is the lubrication and corrosion protection.

If your boiling over regular coolant youve got more problems then swapping miracle coolant as a band aid fix. Bad rad cap for instance can lower the boiling point significantly, if it ACTUALLY reached 265 degrees stuff would start warping

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Evans doesn`t necessarily make the motor run cooler, it just takes a higher temp to boil over. When your radiator with 50/50 boils over its telling you something, running Evans will not let it boil over until the damage is done.

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Engine Ice and Evans coolants do make the engines run hotter due to the fact that water, or water mixed with 'regular' coolant, is more efficient at transferring heat away from the engine.

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DirtRider did a coolant test in a 2003 Yamaha YZ250F (July 2006 issue) . They performed tests on a trail, an MX track, and a static test. Evans wasn't tested, however this post says that Zip-Ty Racing 's coolant (which was tested) is repackaged Evans. Here's some info on their the test which I already summarized for another post. I was focusing on Engine Ice so I've directly quoted their comments about it.

ETA: I did a little more digging and Zip-Ty's coolant does seem to be the same product as Evans coolant.

....They tested distilled water, Preston 50/50 (essentially a stock coolant), Maxima Coolanol, Royal Purple Purple Ice Additive (a surfactant like WaterWetter), Engine Ice, and Zip-Ty Racing XF+ Waterless Race Coolant. Here's what they directly said about Engine Ice:

Probably the most hyped product in our testing, Engine Ice claims to be able to reduce temperatures by as much as 50 degrees. That doesn't mean your normal 220-degree engine will magically run at 170 degrees with the use of Engine Ice. Instead, it means that if you have an engine suffering from extreme overheating, Engine Ice can reduce temperatures below boilover and into the range of normal operating temperature. In trail and track tests, Engine Ice appeared to do a good job of holding steady operating temps. Cylinder head and radiator temps were at least 10-15 degrees lower than with regular coolant. But in the the static run testing it was at least 25 degrees higher than the Prestone 50/50, leading us to believe that it works best in bikes that are constantly moving, such as in racing applications. Although made from a PF-based formula, Engine Ice can be safely mixed with water in a pinch.

My summary of the other products tested...

--Prestone/water 50/50: run of the mill coolant, used as the baseline.

--Coolanol: performed about the same as Prestone.

--Purple Ice Additive: when added to straight water it lowered temps 10 degrees. When added to Prestone it lowered temps 5 degrees.

--Distilled water: in a 20 minute moto it lowered temps by 4 degrees (average). But if the engine got hot, no amount of airflow could bring the temps down appreciably. The loss of water from the overflow compounded the problem.

--Zip-Ty (aka Evans): Must get all residual fluid out of the cooling system before adding. On the track and trail runs, radiator temps averaged 8 degrees cooler; cylinder head temps were 12-15 degrees higher.

It was just another magazine test with who knows how much bias injected--so take it for what it's worth. My personal experience with Engine Ice has been that in a CR250R ridden in the dunes it made a difference in keeping temps in check. I didn't quantify anything but it definitely kept more coolant in the radiators (it always pushes some coolant out when duned hard in warm temps) and seemed to lower the overall temps by an amount I could notice.

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Thanks for the post Hawk- I feel enlightened now. Now I'm just curious to see if Evans is higher than the repackaged Zip-Ty coolant:thumbsup:

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I ran Evans in my KDX because at trail speeds it did have a boil over issue. I did quite a bit of research 2-3 years ago, and as I remember it: the claim is that a)the boiling point is higher so it doesn't boil b)it will let engines run hotter, but this is perfectly OK, c) because it does not boil, the coolant maintains contact with the engine and radiator walls during high temperatures allowing it to maintain the cooling function when water would become less efficient due to steam, voids, and pockets of gasses.

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I took my '05 drz400 offroad recently and got it caked in mud.... anyways... i realized there was a bit of coolant dripping from the top of the rad..from the cap, it was also boiled about half of the resivoir. Tried taking the cap off the rad to check the coolant level.... couldn't get it off.. Now what? Is there a trick to getting it off? Need a new cap? any help would be great. Thanks, Eric.

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My Drz had a tiny minute little screw that held the cap from turning...take it out and pitch it lol

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We used evans + in an airplane project that was boiling on taxi waiting for clearance. Dried ALL the water (bet the magazine didn't) and ran the low pressure cap. Boiling problem solved but did show slightly hotter on the gauge. In high performance engine slightly hotter could mean the difference between detonation or not. Water wetter and similar products work for a short time then the effect goes away. Might be OK for a bike that gets frequent coolant service. In my perfect world trail bikes would still be aircooled, but I digress.

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DirtRider did a coolant test in a 2003 Yamaha YZ250F (July 2006 issue) . They performed tests on a trail, an MX track, and a static test. Evans wasn't tested, however this post says that Zip-Ty Racing 's coolant (which was tested) is repackaged Evans. Here's some info on their the test which I already summarized for another post. I was focusing on Engine Ice so I've directly quoted their comments about it.

ETA: I did a little more digging and Zip-Ty's coolant does seem to be the same product as Evans coolant.

....They tested distilled water, Preston 50/50 (essentially a stock coolant), Maxima Coolanol, Royal Purple Purple Ice Additive (a surfactant like WaterWetter), Engine Ice, and Zip-Ty Racing XF+ Waterless Race Coolant. Here's what they directly said about Engine Ice:

My summary of the other products tested...

--Prestone/water 50/50: run of the mill coolant, used as the baseline.

--Coolanol: performed about the same as Prestone.

--Purple Ice Additive: when added to straight water it lowered temps 10 degrees. When added to Prestone it lowered temps 5 degrees.

--Distilled water: in a 20 minute moto it lowered temps by 4 degrees (average). But if the engine got hot, no amount of airflow could bring the temps down appreciably. The loss of water from the overflow compounded the problem.

--Zip-Ty (aka Evans): Must get all residual fluid out of the cooling system before adding. On the track and trail runs, radiator temps averaged 8 degrees cooler; cylinder head temps were 12-15 degrees higher.

It was just another magazine test with who knows how much bias injected--so take it for what it's worth. My personal experience with Engine Ice has been that in a CR250R ridden in the dunes it made a difference in keeping temps in check. I didn't quantify anything but it definitely kept more coolant in the radiators (it always pushes some coolant out when duned hard in warm temps) and seemed to lower the overall temps by an amount I could notice.

Old thread but would like to see that dirt rider coolant article again.. can't find the one I had.. If I remember right they had royal purple water wetter and water as the coolest running coolant. .. but that is referenced.

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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