Which oil in 07 450?

Personally I'd stick with the oem foam filter or a high quality aftermarket foam filter such as twin air or uni. I don't trust the gauze type filters, I've had them in vehicles and they let fine dust by. I've since switched to tru flow filters for the truck, they get their foam from uni and I haven't seen any dust past the airbox since.

i no this is beating to death but im going to run shell rotella Synthetic but witch weight do i use.

thanks guys

I recommend the Regina ORN-6 chain. Search the topic and look for my discussions of it.

K&N's can be a better filter than foam, but they usually aren't because they usually don't get cleaned and oiled right (It's hard to do). Again, search.

5w40 is good for winter use or cooler temps but still provides that hot protection, thats what i use rotella synthetic 5w40

thanks thats what i thought

i no this is beating to death but im going to run shell rotella Synthetic but witch weight do i use.

thanks guys

Good luck with that, let me know how it works out for you.

I'm a little confused by the Redline oil you linked to: It says it's good for wet clutches, then contradicts itself by stating that it is a JASO MB oil, which should never be used with a wet clutch, since they are outside of the T-903 specification required under MA.

I had the same questions. It took a lot of digging, but here is the story on RedLine:

It contains some moly, but it is MoDTC which won't make a clutch slip (not MoS2 which will). RedLine also has its own proprietary synthetic friction modifiers, and these will not make a clutch slip either. JASO does not have any category to classify these friction modifiers, but seeing it is friction modified, they have to call it JASO MB anyway. There may very well be a JASO MC category in the future, to account for these friction modifiers which will not cause clutch slippage!!!

Got to say that I am seeing improved performance with RedLine! In particular, the engine revs up more quickly. Their friction modifiers work! RedLine is the only one that has these, at least until some other company reverse engineers them or licenses them from RedLine.......

Good luck with that, let me know how it works out for you.

i will, it wont be for another couple of weeks befor the 450 is on its wheels again. man i cant wait for the ice:thumbsup:

(Redline) contains some moly, but it is MoDTC which won't make a clutch slip (not MoS2 which will). RedLine also has its own proprietary synthetic friction modifiers, and these will not make a clutch slip either. ...

Got to say that I am seeing improved performance with RedLine! In particular, the engine revs up more quickly. ...

MoDTC (molybdenum dithio-carbamates) are actually the most common group of moly additives used in motor oil, rather than molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), which is what most incorrectly think "moly" means. It is present in most oils, both MA and MB, and depending on the specific formulation, they may be either a friction reducer or a barrier lubricant (anti-wear additive). There's nothing really new in it as a concept.

The claim of better performance, until it can be quantified, is just an assertion.

The claim of better performance, until it can be quantified, is just an assertion.

This is just based on my own seat of the pants evaluation. I doubt I will ever bother to confirm it on the dyno myself. But those who are looking to milk a little extra horepower out of their engine (and maybe fuel economy), might however be interested....

As I recall, the JASO MA certification does not allow any moly of any kind (????), not to mention new atypical types of friction modifiers that didn't even exist years ago when the category was created.

I'm curious how you "recall" something that has never been?

Maybe you should actually read the JASO standards, instead of passing around bad info based on your assumptions?

:thumbsup:

Good luck with that, let me know how it works out for you.

I picked up on the sarcasm. But, the reality is, a bunch of us use Rotella "car oil" (in your words) in our bikes with no problems. I've been doing it for years with no problems. There is nothing wrong with it, and I'll continue to recommend it as a cheaper alternative to the over-priced motorcycle specific oils.

This is just based on my own seat of the pants evaluation. I doubt I will ever bother to confirm it on the dyno myself. But those who are looking to milk a little extra horepower out of their engine (and maybe fuel economy), might however be interested....

As I recall, the JASO MA certification does not allow any moly of any kind (????), not to mention new atypical types of friction modifiers that didn't even exist years ago when the category was created.

"Butt dynos" are notoriously inaccurate. Seat of the pants evaluations almost universally said the '06 CRF450 and the '03 YZ450 both had significantly more power than the '06 YZ450, when in fact, the Honda came in with a half HP less on Eddie's dyno, and the '03 is at least 1.5 down on the '06.

Having an oil give you a power increase IS possible, however.

JASO MA does not forbid moly additives, and in fact, as I said, most of the better MA oils have it. The only chemistry limitations in the standard are that MA specifies equivalence with API SG/SH in terms of ZDDP and similar boundary lubricants and sets several other requirements. Among those is the minimum coefficient of friction standards set out in JASO T903. T903 originally set out 2 categories, MA and MB, but it has now been updated to T903:2006. The JASO T903:2006 standard sets out four categories of motorcycle oils-MA, MA1, MA2 and MB-allowing motorcycle manufacturers to specify oil with the appropriate friction performance for their engines. For example, oils meeting the MA2 grade have higher friction properties than oils meeting MA1.

... a bunch of us use Rotella "car oil" (in your words) in our bikes with no problems. There is nothing wrong with it,
It does have a weakness. As with the majority of automotive multi grade engine oils, the viscosity index improvers used to enhance its multi grade character are not, it would seem, sufficiently rugged for transmission use. UOA's I have seen have shown a significant drop in viscosity after fairly short periods of use.

While the oil itself is a very good lubricant in almost every other way, it is not really very durable as a gear lube, and if you use it, you should change it often, certainly no less than every second ride, IMO.

It does have a weakness. As with the majority of automotive multi grade engine oils, the viscosity index improvers used to enhance its multi grade character are not, it would seem, sufficiently rugged for transmission use. UOA's I have seen have shown a significant drop in viscosity after fairly short periods of use.

While the oil itself is a very good lubricant in almost every other way, it is not really very durable as a gear lube, and if you use it, you should change it often, certainly no less than every second ride, IMO.

I agree that it should be changed often. I change mine after every ride. My riding buddies make fun of me, but I still change it after every ride. :thumbsup:

Definately AMSOIL exceeds them all you wont be sorry

I picked up on the sarcasm. But, the reality is, a bunch of us use Rotella "car oil" (in your words) in our bikes with no problems. I've been doing it for years with no problems. There is nothing wrong with it, and I'll continue to recommend it as a cheaper alternative to the over-priced motorcycle specific oils.

I've seen the inside of sportbike motors of people who were using that stuff. Not good. On the other hand, i do know a few people who use it in there 450's but they have Rekluse clutches...and change it EVERY ride. I really could care less what everybody uses in there bike. Use what you like.

I picked up on the sarcasm. But, the reality is, a bunch of us use Rotella "car oil" (in your words) in our bikes with no problems. I've been doing it for years with no problems. There is nothing wrong with it, and I'll continue to recommend it as a cheaper alternative to the over-priced motorcycle specific oils.

no i picked up on the sarcasm too but im not going to start some dumb internet fight, :thumbsup:

I live in Southern California so places i ride are usually anywhere from 70 to 100 degrees so Yamalube 4 20w-40 is what i always use.

no i picked up on the sarcasm too but im not going to start some dumb internet fight, :thumbsup:

Thank you. You know all the people that use it seem to like it. For myself, I will use a good quality Motorcycle specific oil. We use the Golden Spectro 10/40 at the shop- 55 gallon drums. Anywayzzzzz.......... Of all the people i hear talking about this oil or that oil....I believe Grayracer is the most informed i've heard....He isn't using car oil because he knows better.:ride:

no i picked up on the sarcasm too but im not going to start some dumb internet fight, :thumbsup:

I'm not starting a internet fight. I was simply stating an opinion (just like everyone else).

And for the record, the ENGINEERS at Rekluse recommend "car oil" for dirt bikes. :ride:

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