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kawirider

Putting a bearing in

12 posts in this topic

I manage to get my old bearing stuck and so I had to order a new relay arm for my linkage. :worthy:

I finally got it and I am a bit nervous about putting the bearings in. Any ideas on how I should go about it? For wheel bearings I would normally just get a socket that is about that size and smack it in. But I'm not sure if the bearing will hold up to it. Its a needle bearing. In the pic on this page its the thing that connects the bottom of the shock to the linkage and the swingarm.

http://www.rg3suspension.com/products.php

Thanks for the help!

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Needle bearings can be tricky. You have to be really carefull not to deform the outter cage with the smacking socket trick.

I machine pushers to fit inside the bearing, and contact JUST the outer edge of the outer cage.

Use a press or a good vise to suck/press them in, hitting a needle bearing will most likely damage it.

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Use a vice to get the bearing started in the hole square. Sometimes you can use a vice to press it in 'till it's flush and finish it with a socket. Use some pieces of aluminum to protect the parts if you use a vice with jaws that are serreted.

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I manage to get my old bearing stuck and so I had to order a new relay arm for my linkage. :worthy:

I finally got it and I am a bit nervous about putting the bearings in. Any ideas on how I should go about it? For wheel bearings I would normally just get a socket that is about that size and smack it in. But I'm not sure if the bearing will hold up to it. Its a needle bearing. In the pic on this page its the thing that connects the bottom of the shock to the linkage and the swingarm.

http://www.rg3suspension.com/products.php

Thanks for the help!

If you have a vise, you can use the vise as a press. Thats how i do the linkage bearings.

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Would it be bad for the long term if I put a little grease in there to help it get in easier? Would something else be better? I'm just worried. I've never failed to put a bearing in and I don't wanna spend another $100.

EDIT: Yes, part #21 in that fiche is the part that I'm putting bearings into.

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I wouldn't use any lubes but, it might make things a little easier to go together if you GENTLY heat the linkage with a propane torch, or better yet put it in your oven at NO MORE than 300 degrees F. If you use an oven make sure not to put the linkage in until after temp has stabilized. Leave linkage in oven for at least an hour before installing bearing. At the same time you are warming the linkage the bearing can be chilled in the freezer for at least an hour as well.

A better way of chilling bearings (other than tossing it into a can of liquid nitrogen) is to get a couple of pounds of dry ice (frozen CO2) and a gallon of acetone (Acetone has a freezing point lower than dry ice) . Place the bearing in a gallon size metal container with the dry ice and add enough acetone to to cover everything (make sure the bearing is on a coathanger hook or something similar). Leave the bearing in the acetone/CO2 'till about half of the dry ice is gone. This will cool the bearing down below -40 degrees F (MUCH colder than your freezer).

I have used this procedures many times to install bearings in cases, hubs, etc. Most times the bearing will just fall into the hole until the temps stabilize.

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Oven and freezer work well, and you shouldn't need to heat it for an hour, i usually go 20 mins. Lubing the bearing to ease install is fine.

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Anti-seize lubes are perfect for press work.

If you decide to use heat, a better solution than the torch is to use an oven set at 275 degrees. Preheat the oven and then heat the part for 20 minutes. The oven is better because the temperature can be controlled, and the heating is more uniform.

Freezing the bearings isn't as helpful as heating the aluminum parts because the expansion rate of steels is so much less than that of aluminum.

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Freezing the bearings isn't as helpful as heating the aluminum parts because the expansion rate of steels is so much less than that of aluminum.

If you do both they can slip right in. I use this technique all the time for bottom end bearings, very gentle install......no smacking.

I don't think you'll get a linkage bearing to "slip” in but it's a helpful trick for engine bearings.

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If you do both they can slip right in. I use this technique all the time for bottom end bearings, very gentle install......no smacking.

I don't think you'll get a linkage bearing to "slip” in but it's a helpful trick for engine bearings.

Takes less than 5 minutes to do all the linkage bearings using a vise. No heat.

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get a 1/2 inch threaded bolt about 7 inches long. get a socket that is the same diameter as the bearing and that will allow the threaded rod to pass through the socket. take a washer and put it on the bolt and then the socket and the new bearing. run the rest of the bolt through the relay arm. on the other side where the bolt will come out, but a spacer or washer that covers the opening of the relay arm. then put a 1/2 inch nut on the bolt on that side. hold the bolt on the side where the socket is, and turn the nut on the opposite side to pull the bearing into the relay arm. it acts like a press. takes hardly any effort to press the bearing in this way.

don't use a socket and hammer. you'll damage the roller bearing, and are really tight to try to bang in. that method is for wheel bearings really.

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