did i adjust my chain wrong or what on my 07 450

my chain is hitting my frame on my 07 yz 450 how are you supose to adjust the chain on these newer frames

When the chain on your '07 is adjusted right, it will look loose compared to how your '04 was. Be sure to measure at least 1.9" at the raised chain to the rear slider screw (see your manual).

The chain hitting the frame (assuming it's not the piece of junk the bike came with new) is almost always due to the rear whell bing out of line. Don't trust the axle blocks until you've checked to see if they're right.

I HAVE AN NEW CHAIN , I HAVE THE AFTER MARKET ADJUSTING BLOCKS .

is that why it was doing this

i have seen threads about this but i cant find them any input helps

i'v read guys that are hitting the frame with there chain are reading the axel block marks from front to back, not back to front.

thus the tire ends up out of alignment.

that and the chains are too loose....

A good tip is this: when you're done adjusting the wheel for length, sight down the chain and make sure it's running straight. It'll save lots of grief.

I never use the lines on the blocks when I adjust my chain. I measure each adjuster bolt with a set of calipers to make sure they are both the same length. Takes a little more time, but I know my wheel's aligned properly.

I measure each adjuster bolt with a set of calipers to make sure they are both the same length. Takes a little more time, but I know my wheel's aligned properly.

What if the two axle lugs are not identical, the two axle blocks are not identically thick from the bore to the front edge, or the two legs of the swing arm are different lengths?

Use the straight edge/rod method laid out in the links I posted, then see what the blocks look like in reference to the marks on the swing arm. Once you "qualify" the marks, they can be used reliably.

I use the marks on my axle blocks, exclusively. They are GYTR and they are the same(thickness, the same marks) on each side. I have not had any issues with uneven wear or chain hitting anything but the chain slider. And my tension is 3 fingers...whatever this measures to, approx 1.75 - 2.25 inches or there about

Be sure it's at least 1.9" on your '06.

Be sure it's at least 1.9" on your '06.

depending on how much alcohol is consumed.....bloating may add a few mm....:thumbsup:

i'v read guys that are hitting the frame with there chain are reading the axel block marks from front to back, not back to front.

thus the tire ends up out of alignment.

When I got my nearly new '06 home, I found it like that; one whole mark off because it was read front to back.
What if the two axle lugs are not identical, the two axle blocks are not identically thick from the bore to the front edge, or the two legs of the swing arm are different lengths?

Use the straight edge/rod method laid out in the links I posted, then see what the blocks look like in reference to the marks on the swing arm. Once you "qualify" the marks, they can be used reliably.

Leave it to grayracer to come up with all these good questions! :thumbsup: What I do is measure the length of each adjuster bolt from where the nut seats to the head of the bolt, then tighten the axle nut back down. Then I'll step back a ways and sight down the chain from the rear sprocket to the front sprocket. Doing it this way I've never had a problem with the alignment being off. It seems to work good for YZF's, on other bikes it may not.

When I got my nearly new '06 home, I found it like that; one whole mark off because it was read front to back.

I know everyone say's to junk the stock stuff when you bring the bike home, and I will probably get hammered for this, but I still have my stock chain and sprockets on the bike after a year now, I also don't have any frame wear marks either.

I saw from the beginning that the marks on the front of the block were not the same as the rear, so I have used the rear of the blocks for alignment/adjustment. I have made sure to follow the manual specs for chain adjustment, I tend to keep it a little on the looser side rather than having it too tight.

After each ride I wash the bike and scrub the chain and sprocket clean, I then WD40 the chain. When I prep the bike for the next ride, I check the chain adjustment and lube it (silkolene chain lube)...

My rear sprocket still looks pretty good, teeth are straight, but you can start to see wear on it, the front sprocket still looks great. The chain did stretch a fair bit, but seems to have settled in pretty good for awhile now.. I know it is time for replacements so I will go with a DID ert non O ring chain, and probably that new twin ring renthal rear sprocket(expensive)..

I think how you take care of your equipment will determine the longevity of it.

I have an '07 YZ450. I saw a post about this issue before I got the bike and knew to look for frame erosion from the chain. My chain was taking a serious bite into the frame and I tried several ways to verify alignment. I would try an alignment method, mark the area with blue machinists dye and go ride. The chain kept wearing the stuff off and eating the frame. I would think of another alignment method and the chain kept hitting the frame. Things I tried included:

1) Sighted the sprockets.

2) Used a straight edge.

3) Ensured same distance from swingarm pivot to axle centers on each side.

4) Welded up a special tool to rest on the rear sprocket and indicate the front sprocket.

In the end I basically verified that each of the alignment methods agreed with the previous adjustments and I had a high confidence in my alignment. At the same time I was very interested in this issue on other YZ450's. I have checked a few and they all had significant wear (> .125").

So ... I ended up making a simple chain block using 3/4" aluminum angle and 1/2" HDPE. The aluminum is JB welded to the frame and the plastic is held on with a couple of screws. The chain block in the photo has over 40 hours on it, most of it being used in desert scrambles. It is holding up well and I don't see any more frame wear.

?action=view&current=chain_block.jpg

http://s213.photobucket.com/albums/cc103/DusTRhodes/?action=view&current=chain_block.jpg

9 thousand dollar bike and they don't stamp the adjustment marks correct hmm how can i trust the marks on the cam if i cant trust the marks on the swing arm?

japs these days...:thumbsup:

i was having this problem but it wasent hitting the frame the only thing i was doing wrong was reading front to back and not back to front. just remember back to front

What the hell was yamaha thinking not supplying the bikes with identical adjustment blocks on each side :thumbsup: . I'd like to beat the living snot out of the engineer that made that decision :thumbsup: What? Did they want the chains to wear the subframe and frame out so people would be buying replacements?

But like others have said, back to front on the blocks and running the chain on the tight side of spec have eliminated the chain rub.

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