How do you check for chain wear

I have a DID ERT2 (non O ring) with 25 hours of trail riding on it. It seems like the links are loose - when flexing the chain side to side by hand - but I can't remember exactly how it was when it was new. How do you determine if a chain is worn out. Oh, I don't like to lube chains either.

it shouldnt be worn out that quick... unless u dont have the chain at the proper tension and dont use a good lubricant. no lube and too tight or too loose on a 450 isnt easy on the chain and sprockets. :thumbsup:

Take a pair of 6" vernier calipers and set it to 5.85". Then push down on the bottom run of chain and measure between the rollers on the tightened top run. If you start with the dimension above, your caliper will sit between two rollers with nine pins between them. The measurement should not exceed 6", by the book (I give up on them at 5.94"). Be sure to measure several different sections.

If you don't have access to a caliper, lay the chain out on the floor and pull it out to it's maximum length. Count out 101 pins and measure the distance between them. New is 62.5", the 2% maximum length is 63.75. Again, I'd discard it at 63.4" (1.5% over length)

I have a DID ERT2 (non O ring) with 25 hours of trail riding on it. It seems like the links are loose - when flexing the chain side to side by hand - but I can't remember exactly how it was when it was new. How do you determine if a chain is worn out. Oh, I don't like to lube chains either.

2 things..... 1. Non-O ring chains are not great for woods riding. 2. A good lube like Maxima Chain Guard will help them last longer.

If I was you, I'd go buy a new steel sprocket set and an O-ring chain and start over.

Don't forget to buy some chain lube too. :thumbsup:

Take a pair of 6" vernier calipers and set it to 5.85". Then push down on the bottom run of chain and measure between the rollers on the tightened top run. If you start with the dimension above, your caliper will sit between two rollers with nine pins between them. The measurement should not exceed 6", by the book (I give up on them at 5.94"). Be sure to measure several different sections.

If you don't have access to a caliper, lay the chain out on the floor and pull it out to it's maximum length. Count out 101 pins and measure the distance between them. New is 62.5", the 2% maximum length is 63.75. Again, I'd discard it at 63.4" (1.5% over length)

Interesting. :thumbsup: I've never measured one, but it makes sense.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now