HEADS UP!!!

Site upgrade in progress... Core site functions are working, but some non-critical features/functions will be temporarily unavailable while we work to restore them over the next couple of weeks.

Please post any bugs you encounter, but before you do, check to see if it's already listed.

Thanks for your patience while we work to improve the community.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
DSTerry

Hydraulic brake switch problem

12 posts in this topic

I installed a hydraulic brake switch on my rear brake about 2 years ago. I only have 250 miles on the bike since then (I know, I should ride more!!), and the brake switch started working intermittently, then finaly quit.

I disconnected the wires, and using an ohm meter, I noticed that the switch was still working when I pressed the pedal. So then I connected 12V right to the brake light, and the light worked just fine. I measured the current draw and it was around 1.7A (just right for a 20W bulb).

Even when I connected 12V to one side of the switch, then pressed the pedal, I measure 12V on the other side of the switch (without connecting it to any load). Once I connect the brake light, the switch does not close anymore.

Anyone ever have this problem? I don't know to much about these pressure switches, but is this a typical failure characteristic of it? I hate to keep having to replace these things only after a couple hundred miles of use. Maybe I bought a cheap one.

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My switch failed after 300 miles and sprung a leak through the top. I lost my rear brake immediately. Wanted to pursue it with K&S who made my switch but threw it away when I saw what happened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you have power into the sw. and you tested the light/wires to it. all is good untill you connect the sw.? repl. the sw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

these switches do fail on occasion. just think about the environment they are in. harsh vibration, heat extremes, pressure, caustic brake fluid ect. and for less than 25 bucks, yup the fail. one that failed causing a loss of brakes is a reason to me to persue at least a free replacemnt if only 300 miles old.

but electical fails happen, I"ve had a couple fail over the last 4 years of using them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probally heat related. If it is like my XR600 the exhaust is very close to the rear master and banjo bolt. I put my dual sport brake light switch on the front master for that reason and have never had any problems as of yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why not use the old spring actuated plunger type.. they rarely went bad and you won't risk losing your brakes and you won't have to bleed them to replace it....:excuseme:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

location, not an easy way to ad one to a 650R where it won't get knocked off by a boot or light crash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the info. I was already planning on purchasing a new one, but it is good to hear that I don't have anything that unusual.

My exhaust is very close to that setup, so heat is an issue back there. I was thinking of putting it on my front brake. I would just need to run my brake line wire up front.

I just found it interesting that the switch would fail only when under a load.

Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for all the info. I was already planning on purchasing a new one, but it is good to hear that I don't have anything that unusual.

My exhaust is very close to that setup, so heat is an issue back there. I was thinking of putting it on my front brake. I would just need to run my brake line wire up front.

I just found it interesting that the switch would fail only when under a load.

Thanks again.

this can happen with high resistance in the switch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine did the exact same thing, tested with the ohm meter, seemed ok. Replaced it, new one works fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

unfortunately resistance testing doesnt absolutely condemn an electrical part. it may ohm out fine but the question is, how does it react when energized? it might fail then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0